Replacing a dinosaur



#11

A few weeks ago I received a message from an individual in Venezuela. He asked if I could sell him a TI-58, 58C or 59 with an Applied Statistics module. I responded that I had the calculators and the module in my collection but I did not have spares for sale. I also asked why he would want to acquire such old hardware. His response was that he wanted the capability of four programs in the module

ST-06 Analysis of Variance Data

ST-15 One Way Analysis of Variance

ST-16 Two Way Analysis of Variance

ST-22 F-distribution

and asked if I could send the listings for those programs to him. I have done that. I have no idea how he could use the listings since they take up way too much memory if they are not in the module.

Anyway, after some of the recent correspondence about dinosaurs it occurred to me that someone might tell me what more modern machine might provide the capability he wants. I know that the TI-74 with its Statistics module and the TI-95 with its Statistics module will provide nearly identical capability, but those machines are probably harder to find than the TI-58/59. I don't know of a later model TI that would help. I do have spare HP-10B's, a spare HP-11C, and several spare HP-12C's in my collection that I could offer to sell to him. Would one of those be appropriate? If not, is there a later model HP that would be?


#12

I would vote for a 48GX with the freely available Stat48Pro. Unfortunately, the library is too big for a 48G.

I also have to admit I am one of those heretics who actually really likes my 49G+, which I am sure has some if not all of those statistical capabilities built-in.

Les


#13

This one will work pretty well in a 48G, although, I have to say I am a bit biaised.

Arnaud


#14

Excellent!

Seems to have the essential stuff from stat48 and stat48pro, and it can be used on an HP48G without totally dominating the memory.

The HP48G is usually available for much less than the expandable GX. I think if money is limited the original poster may like a 48G with this excellent free library.

Les


#15

It actually has exactly the same things as Stat48. At the time, I was thinking that Stat48 was slow so I rewrote it completely in sysRPL. I didn't have access to internet and it is only later that I found out that the author was doing the same job to release stat48pro.

Since then, every time someone says "lets rewrite this program but faster", I recommend them to contact the author first.

Arnaud

#16

I was wrong!

HP49G+ has a limited offering of inferential statistics, z and t test stuff, but no ANOVA. The UTPF functions gives the associated upper-tail probability for input numerator and denominator degrees of freedom and the value of the test statistic.

For ANOVA he would need someting extra, like one of the Stat48 libraries already mentioned.

Les

#17

Hi, Palmer --

Quote:
ST-06 Analysis of Variance Data

ST-15 One Way Analysis of Variance

ST-16 Two Way Analysis of Variance

ST-22 F-distribution

I do have spare HP-10B's, a spare HP-11C, and several spare HP-12C's in my collection that I could offer to sell to him. Would one of those be appropriate? If not, is there a later model HP that would be?


None of these three HP models has these built-in capabilities, or the expandability to easily add them.

However, the Stat Pac or Math/Stat Pac for the HP-41 has RPN routines that calculate one- and two-way ANOVA. If "F-distribution" is the normal distribution with cumulative integral, the Pac has that as well, implemented as an RPN routine. Kind of clunky, but they'll work.

The rare HP-21S (Pioneer series) has built-in microcoded functions for the normal distribution, but no ANOVA.

Best regards,

-- KS

Edited: 22 June 2006, 1:00 a.m.


#18

Quote:
If "F-distribution" is the normal distribution with cumulative integral, the Pac has that as well, implemented as an RPN routine. Kind of clunky, but they'll work.

The rare HP-21S (Pioneer series) has built-in microcoded functions for the normal distribution, but no ANOVA.


The 21S also contains the F-distribution. It is one of 4 "standard" distributions in this calc, i.e. Normal (or Gaussian), Chi-Square, T (or Student's), and F. As a matter of fact, this is the only reason why I added this calc to my small collection. Although it's not RPN ...

#19

I would vote for an Hp17B (of any flavor, the older line of better quality than the new ones on the shelf which DO HAVE 32K). With its built in stats, solver, and long variable names, you should be able to put together anything you need in stats and have a great pocket calculator. It is an algebraic calculator with the newer II and II+ having an RPN option (which I suspect he doesn't want or need).

What happened to his STATS module? True, his Ti may have died, but the module could be recovered or did he toss out that peice of JUNK, only to find he should have scavaged the module?

He might be able to make the newer Hp33s work, but its stats are not nearly as good as the Hp17's and with single varables, RAM availability isn't anywhere close to 32K.

If he doesn't need any trig functions, my suggest is the Hp 17B series.

Or he has to move into the graphics line.

The Ti-83/84 would work well for him, the Ti-83/84 is very easy to use and is programmable in BASIC (Ti version) so is easy to customize.
Hp39/40G series which is similar to Ti-83, with lots more math capability (no real edge in Stats though), but is programmed with applets which are more awkward to implement than BASIC (or thats my experience, but I don't use this algebraic machine that much).

Or a Casio or Sharp graphics. All have or can be made to be comparable through programming.

I would probably avoid recommending an RPN only machine to him unless he is of an open mind and can show a commitment to learning all the other features of the Hp48/49 line or even an Hp41 series.

If I could suggest something for him w/o regard to availability, I would suggest an Hp27s! The Hp19B is also extremely similar in features and functions (and fairly easy to still get), but is a DAMN clamshell with the weak battery door (that takes 3 N cells!) and somewhat bulkier form factor and lacks algebraic precidence (business calcs often do, and that irks ME!)


#20

Just in case he is interested, I have a couple of 58c's that I can part with. I am not much of a TI collector any way. I have no stat module however.

#21

If he can't find what he exactly is looking for, I'd suggest to hunt for a Casio FX-850P (or its cousin FX-880P with more RAM). The machine has 116 scientific programs built-in, among them 47 statistical functions.

Marcus


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Replacing Rechargeable Batteries on TDS/SMI RAM cards aj04062 2 769 04-12-2012, 11:20 PM
Last Post: Geoff Quickfall
  HP49g+ keyboard replacing AdrianT 1 545 12-18-2011, 12:09 AM
Last Post: Han
  Repair/Replacing an HP 11C LCD Jerry 2 658 09-26-2010, 08:02 AM
Last Post: aj04062
  Replacing dead screen on my HP17BII with one from HP27S? John Hinz 10 1,514 07-10-2010, 03:56 PM
Last Post: Csaba Tizedes (Hungary)
  Replacing HP35s batteries Dave Shaffer (Arizona) 0 426 05-04-2010, 01:45 PM
Last Post: Dave Shaffer (Arizona)
  Replacing a dinosaur Palmer O. Hanson, Jr. 0 346 06-21-2006, 10:30 PM
Last Post: Palmer O. Hanson, Jr.
  Replacing a dinosaur Palmer O. Hanson, Jr. 0 324 06-21-2006, 10:27 PM
Last Post: Palmer O. Hanson, Jr.
  replacing 49g+ photron (ron) 21 2,449 06-14-2006, 02:45 PM
Last Post: declan
  HP41CY - Replacing the internal +3v lithium cell Christoph Klug 11 1,378 02-28-2006, 05:51 AM
Last Post: Juergen Keller
  Replacing the HP-9100 decimal point select switch David Smith 0 369 02-06-2006, 07:20 PM
Last Post: David Smith

Forum Jump: