RPL programing



#12

Hey folks,
Where would be a good start to try my hand a BEGINNER's level programming on the 48 series calcs - or basic BASIC (heh) programming on the 71b?
Also, has anyone here used a HP 28 model? I see they are cheap on ebay...is this due to poor construction? I kind of wonder about the clamshell kinking/damaging the wiring between the two sides.

Joe


#13

Hi, Joe;

my suggestioin would be theearlier HP48G Advanced User's Reference Guide + HP48G User's Manual. They are concise, well written and specially the AURG explains RPL-based program structures very well.

About the HP28: there are two models, the earlier HP28C (4KBytes RAM) and the later HP28S (32KBytes RAM). I consider the HP28S as having a better interface, with better structured menus.

About the clamshell: there is no wires between them, just a single-piece, multi-layer flex-circuit assy. When the calculator has its case open and 'lined up', as if placed in a plane table, the flex circuit is not bent. When it is closed or tottaly folded, back-to-back fashion, the flex circuit has each half part (one on each shell) 45 degrees twisted in relation the 'hinge' part of the flex circuit. I was never told that this flex circuit has been broken or had a broken track.

Cheers.

Luiz (Brazil)

#14

I've heard bad things about clamshells in terms of repairability. I'm not sure if the wiring between the two halves is a liability, but from the information I gleaned from the many threads re: repair on this forum, once they do start to get problems in the areas of wiring or bad keys, they're almost impossible to fix.


I bought a 28S when it first came out, and it is an extremely cool machine, but I found the clamshell design to be awkward. As long as it's lying on a flat surface, it's OK, but as a hand-held, it sucks. I can't say anything about how reliable or durable it is, because I only had it for about a year... I sold it once the novelty of RPL and symbolic algebra wore off (and I realized that anything I can't do on the 42S, I'd much rather do on a computer).


If you like RPL, I'd say get a 48G instead. They come a lot cheaper than the 48GX, apparently because surveyors and other power users can't live with the 48G's lack of expandability -- but if you like the 28S, chances are you'll like the 48G even more. Keep in mind that the 28S only has a one-way IR interface, while the 48G has a two-way IR interface *and* a serial port.

- Thomas

#15

I have an 18C, which I use once a week. No problems thus far but the keyboard sucks. The equals key has a notable different feel than the other keys due to it being the key used most (is this still english grammar?;). I guess this is a result from HP being experimenting with cheap plastic domes for the first time AFAIK. However, I have no such problems with pioneer keyboards.

Thomas

#16

Hi, Joe:

Joe posted:
"Where would be a good start to try my hand a [...] basic
BASIC (heh) programming on the 71b?"

    For learning (and coming to appreciate) BASIC on the HP-71B, there's nothing better than these two excellent books:
          HP-71 BASIC Made Easy by Joseph K. Horn 

    The Basic HP-71 by Richard Harvey .

    Both are extremely enjoyable to read, very good, funny style, full of (excellent) examples and will carry you all the way from zero to hero ... erm, I mean, right to machine language programming.

    After reading them, have a look at my HP-71B articles/programs. They aren't that simple, but some useful techniques are implemented and commented and will show you how some pretty tricky tasks are programmed and just how easy HP-71B BASIC makes it all.

Best regards from V.

#17

Quote:
Hi, Joe:

Joe posted:
"Where would be a good start to try my hand a [...] basic
BASIC (heh) programming on the 71b?"

    For learning (and coming to appreciate) BASIC on the HP-71B, there's nothing better than these two excellent books:
          HP-71 BASIC Made Easy by Joseph K. Horn 

    The Basic HP-71 by Richard Harvey .

    Both are extremely enjoyable to read, very good, funny style, full of (excellent) examples and will carry you all the way from zero to hero ... erm, I mean, right to machine language programming.

    After reading them, have a look at my HP-71B articles/programs. They aren't that simple, but some useful techniques are implemented and commented and will show you how some pretty tricky tasks are programmed and just how easy HP-71B BASIC makes it all.

Best regards from V.


V,
Where would I find these out of print books? Are they on the MoHPC DVD (just ordered it)? I cannot seem to find the books on the DVD or your articles in the article section.

Joe

Edited: 10 Feb 2006, 9:00 a.m.


#18

Hi again, Joe:

Joe posted:

"V, Where would I find these out of print books? Are they on the MoHPC DVD (just ordered it)? I cannot seem to find the books on the
DVD or your articles in the article section."

    Good question ... I had assumed that they would be in the MoHP
    DVD but alas, they actually aren't :-(

    They're probably not on sale anymore, but perhaps can be located at some store specialized in old books. The details for Mr. Horn's book are:

                 Title     :  Hp-71 Basic Made Easy
    Author : Joseph Horn
    ISBN : 0-9612174-3-X / 096121743X
    Publisher : Educalc Pubns
    Edition : Softcover
    and failing that, eBay or an add in the proper section of this forum might help. Also, I you can read French, there's a French-language translation on line, namely:
             LE HP-71, C'EST FACILE 
    that may be of some help, though it doesn't include some listings at the end of the book.

    As for my articles, you can download most of them from
    my web page, as PDF documents, and failing that, let me know and I'll send the ones you wish to any e-mail address of yours you care to provide, also as PDF files.

    The reason they aren't in the Articles' section is because I only want to distribute them in PDF format (so as to keep their exact, facsimile original form, fonts & formatting & images and all), and MoHP only hosts html or text files, it seems. I asked David if he would host them in PDF format, but he apparently wasn't interested as that would be inconvenient for people accessing the articles from some non-PDF capable portable device or such, whatever.

Thanks for your interest in the HP-71B and

Best regards from V.


#19

Try Eduardo's Rpl tutorials.

http://www.engineering.usu.edu/cee/faculty/gurro/Software_Calculators/HP48_49G_Docs/UserRPLTut.pdf

Pio

#20

I haven't tried the other books recommended above, but I personally thought HP's manuals for the 71 were great. When I got my 71, I just started at the front of the owner's manual and worked my way through, and at the end, felt like I knew the product-- without ever having gotten to "the hard part." I felt no need at all for another book to "make it easy." Later I added tons of new programming features from the users' groups (through LEX files), but by then I knew the computer they were going into, and there was no difficulty.

Edited: 10 Feb 2006, 3:02 p.m.

#21

My first was the 28S back in '89 and I learned a lot on it (reading and applying all the manuals, etc). I kept mine in great condition and never had any problems. However, at one time I had programmed 30k out of the available 32k and let the batteries get low on me. I lost everything in memory! The battery door is not so tough to use once you get used to it, and you have about 30 sec. to swap batteries before you lose memory. It's terrible as a handheld. Back in the day if I could have afforded a 48G (or GX), I would have given my 28S an early retirement. The 48G series is a much better machine (except you have to get used to all the shifts due to fewer keys than the 28S). The 48-series AUR is great. There are also about five (at least) good books on programming the 48 for calculus / differential equations, and is well documented with minimal google searching.

#22

I like the 28 series calculators. They are cheap and reliable. I've never had a keyboard or clamshell interconnect problem. I've seen a few with display problems, the sort of thing that often afflicts calculators with LCD graphics displays. The weak point of the design is the battery door. They are a pain in the neck to replace after changing the batteries. They are often cracked or damaged by frustrated users. The display doesn't have the resolution or contrast of the displays on the 48 series calculators, but it is acceptable. The batteries (N cells) are a little hard to find. I've found them at Radio Shack and battery specialty stores on the Internet. The manuals are well written.

If you see one, preferably the 28S, in good condition (check battery door), with the manuals, give it a shot. I've picked them up on eBay for very reasonable prices.

I still have a 28C that I bought when it was introduced. It's never had any problems.


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