HP collections



#80

Hi..i just was asking myself about the mean numbers of units held by collectors....how many of them do you currently own?

I first...

28s
17BII
all voyagers (except 10c)
48G
48GX

that´s all...


#81

about 17 hp's and a few others

**update** more like 21

1       11C  
2 12C
2 15C
0 16C
3 20S
0 21s
0 22s
1 32s
1 32sii
1 10b
0 14b
0 19b
1 17bii
1 27s
0 28S
0 41CV "blanknut"
1 41CV
0 41CX
1 45
0 48S
0 48SX
0 48G
0 48G+
2 48GX
1 49G
0 49G+
1 33s
2 30s
also:
2 128 kB expansions 48gx
1 2048 kB expansions 48gx

One of the 15c's is on loan.

Edited: 31 Oct 2005, 3:30 p.m.

#82

About 200 HPs and, more or less, 30 from other brands.


#83

x

#84

Just remember, Massimo - a man with two watches is never quite sure what time it is.

;)

Best,

--- Les

[http://www.lesbell.com.au]

#85

Quote:
About 200 HPs and, more or less, 30 from other brands.

I have a 25, 67, 15C, 42S, and 48G.


Only five, but that means I can love each one a great deal more. :-D

(I used to have a 10C, 16C, 28S, and 41CX (with card reader and printer) as well, but I gave them away after a while. I guess I wasn't ready for the whole display case business. Didn't have room for it, either!)


#86

Quote:
Only five, but that means I can love each one a great deal more. :-D

Yes, I agree. Both of my 12c's are unpowered (I don't find them useful for anything). My 10b is never used in a year. One 30s is unpowered.

70% of my time is between the 32sii, 11c, 33s
10% of my time between 27s and 15c
10% between 32s, 30s, 17bii, 49g, 20s
10% to one of the 48gx.
The rest are in need of some work or a re neglected entirely, though I have at times chosen to "rotate" the 17bii, or the 32s, or the 15c, or even the 30s, into daily service for a change of pace.

The 49g is primarily a travelling alarm clock! (It wakes me up with "ode to joy")

#87

My current count is 38 HP machines:

1       11C  
1 12C
1 15C
1 16C
1 20S
1 28S
1 41CV "blanknut"
3 41CV
2 41CX
1 45
1 48S
1 48SX
1 48G
1 48G+
1 48GX
1 49G
1 49G+
1 67
4 71B
3 75C
1 75D
1 85A
1 85B
1 87XM
1 95LX
3 97
1 200LX
1 9816S

Most of the duplicates were acquired in pursuit of one or another peripheral or other add-on.

Edited: 31 Oct 2005, 3:11 p.m.


#88

Howard

thanks for posting the list. I borrowed it and edited it for my list. I hope you don't mind :^)


#89

You're quite welcome!

I just added a 32Sii to my collection between my last post and this. 8)

#90

Hi Will,

HP
10A
10C
11C
12C
15C
16C
19C
21A
22A
25A
25C
27A
29C
31E (I sold the other Spices)
35 V2
35 V3
35 V4
41C
41CV
41CV
41CX
41CX opt001 Blanknut
45
55
65
67
70
80
81
86B
97
970 (Ok, I'm cheating, it's a DMM)
9815S
9825T

TI
TI 5025
SR-50
SR-50A
SR-51
SR-51A
SR-51 II
SR-52
SR-56
TI-57 II
TI-58
TI-MBA
TI Business Analyst
TI Programmer
BA-55
TI-66

All Rockwells

All Casio Mini & Pocket mini

All Casio SL

Kind regards from France!

Etienne


#91

Some people might find this interesting. It explains where I am coming from:


1 41CV with maths, circuits, purchased new Feb 1981 for comms engineering student/prof. use.
Xfunctions and time module acquired 1984.

(Modified: clock doubled in 82. Repaired a number of times including for "N" nicad gas leak in 86 and keyboard mech. failure in 94. Main use is in electronics (active filters, timing, gain-bandwidth calcs), acoustics (speaker cabinet resonance/standing wavelength calcs) or mechanical (gearbox /diff what ifs, torque, carb. flow rate calcs etc.) Some simple project mngmnt.

1 41C bought (d.o.a.) on Ebay from Louisianna USA
(ex coal/petrochemical co.) for testbed use. Badly contaminated.
Stripped except LCD and repaired to "as new" for use.
1980 machine.

#92

HI Will

I have at this moment 69 HP calc's:

10A
10B
10B2
10C
11C
12C
12C with Enron label
12C platinum
14B
14B 50 years anniversery
15C
16C
17B
17B2
17B2+
18C
19B
19B2
19C
20S
21
21S
22
22S
25A
25
25C
27
27S
28C
28S
29C
31E
32E
32S
32S 50 anniversery
33C
34C
37C
38C
38E
35 V1
35 V2
35 V3
35 V4
38G
39G
41C low buttons
41C High buttons
41CV
41CV opt001 blanknut
41CX
42S
45
46
48G
55
65
67
70
71B
80 V1
80 V2
80 personalised to Sales manager with a transparant back and charger
91
92
97
97 with IO interface


Gr

Ronald


#93

Hi Ronald!

Waow, you succeeded in getting a 37C !!! Must be quite rare :-))

Etienne


#94

Hi Etienne,

Fully correct, A little to quick copy and paste, offcourse a 37E.

Gr.

Ronald

#95

1 10C
3 11C
3 15C
1 20S Alg
1 32SII Original
1 32SII with Alum bezel

Sold off all LED units, 41s.

#96

in chrono order

21
29C
20S
32SII brown
32SII silver
30S
48G
11C
12C
28S

that's all

#97

My shelf shows HP35(2), 45, 65, 21, 25C(2), 19C, 67, 97(actually on my desk), 32e, 33e(a wreck), 34c, 41c, 41cv, 11c, 15c, 16c, 71b, 28s, 27s, 32s, 42s, 20s, 21s(2), 32sii, 48s, 48sx, 48g(2), 48gx plus a TI SR-51, because this type was my first calc ever after the era of slide rules.

#98

2 11C's
2 15C's
1 32SII
1 34C
1 35
1 42S
1 48GX
1 49G

Since I use 'em all on a regular basis (with the exception of the 35 and the spare units), should this set be considered a collection?

Edited to update:

1 48S
1 200LX

Edited: 3 Nov 2005, 4:06 p.m.

#99

Here is my list, duplicate entries are separate machines (sorry if the formatting isn't good it's pasted out of a spreadsheet):

Make Model
Addimult Sumax-E
Allied Slide Rule
Braun ET 100
Braun ET 66
Budenburg Guage Co. Circ.Slide Rule
Burroughs C3260
Casio CFX-9850G
Casio DC-800GY
Casio fx-450
Casio fx-82 solar
Casio fx-85MS
Casio fx-85WA
Casio CM-604 mini
CBM 774D
CBM 776M
CBM C108
CBM SR7919
CBM SR7919
Citizen SLD-715B
Colex 811A
Commodore 796M
Commodore 796M
Commodore F4902
Commodore GL-976M
Commodore GL-997RF
Commodore LC5K3
Commodore LC5K3
Commodore P50
Commodore SR4912
Commodore SR7919
Commodore SR7949
Commodore SR8120
Commodore SR9190R
Compucorp 342
Compucorp 324G
Decimal Currency calc
Detson E501
Elektronika MK-52
Elektronika MK-61
Fearns Circ.Slide Rule
Hewlett-Packard Vect.Imp. S-R
Hewlett-Packard HP-6S
Hewlett-Packard HP-10B
Hewlett-Packard HP-10B
Hewlett-Packard HP-10BII
Hewlett-Packard HP-11C
Hewlett-Packard HP-12C
Hewlett-Packard HP-12C
Hewlett-Packard HP-12C
Hewlett-Packard HP-14B 50th
Hewlett-Packard HP-16C
Hewlett-Packard HP-17BII
Hewlett-Packard HP-18C
Hewlett-Packard HP-20S
Hewlett-Packard HP-21S
Hewlett-Packard HP-21S
Hewlett-Packard HP-22S
Hewlett-Packard HP-25
Hewlett-Packard HP-28S
Hewlett-Packard HP-30S
Hewlett-Packard HP-32SII
Hewlett-Packard HP-35 v2
Hewlett-Packard HP-38C
Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV
Hewlett-Packard HP-41CX
Hewlett-Packard HP-42S
Hewlett-Packard HP-45
Hewlett-Packard HP-48G
Hewlett-Packard HP-71B
Hewlett-Packard HP-71B
Hewlett-Packard HP-71B
Hewlett-Packard HP-71B
Hewlett-Packard HP-71B
Hewlett-Packard HP-97
Hewlett-Packard Jornada 548
Hewlett-Packard HP-82240B
Imperial 90S
Key Line Concise 28N
Lotus Flower Abacus
Needham TrigEasy
Novus 850
Olympia CD 100
Prinztronic M500
Psion 3c
Psion 3mx
PYE P-640
Rapid Data Systems Rapidman 800
Rockwell 18R
Santron 20S
Sanyo ICC-802D
Sanyo ICC-1122
Sperry-Remington 661D
Summit Ko8
Texas Instruments TI-1025
Texas Instruments TI-1250
Texas Instruments TI-2500
Texas Instruments TI-2500B
Texas Instruments TI-3500
Unisonic 811
Universal 999
WHS Albert2


Sorry about the lack of any formatting in the last post. I am trying again as I can't edit it:



Make Model

Addimult Sumax-E

Allied Slide Rule

Braun ET 100

Braun ET 66

Budenburg Guage Co. Circ.Slide Rule

Burroughs C3260

Casio CFX-9850G

Casio DC-800GY

Casio fx-450

Casio fx-82 solar

Casio fx-85MS

Casio fx-85WA

Casio CM-604 mini

CBM 774D

CBM 776M

CBM C108

CBM SR7919

CBM SR7919

Citizen SLD-715B

Colex 811A

Commodore 796M

Commodore 796M

Commodore F4902

Commodore GL-976M

Commodore GL-997RF

Commodore LC5K3

Commodore LC5K3

Commodore P50

Commodore SR4912

Commodore SR7919

Commodore SR7949

Commodore SR8120

Commodore SR9190R

Compucorp 342

Compucorp 324G

Decimal Currency calc

Detson E501

Elektronika MK-52

Elektronika MK-61

Fearns Circ.Slide Rule

Hewlett-Packard Vect.Imp. S-R

Hewlett-Packard HP-6S

Hewlett-Packard HP-10B

Hewlett-Packard HP-10B

Hewlett-Packard HP-10BII

Hewlett-Packard HP-11C

Hewlett-Packard HP-12C

Hewlett-Packard HP-12C

Hewlett-Packard HP-12C

Hewlett-Packard HP-14B 50th

Hewlett-Packard HP-16C

Hewlett-Packard HP-17BII

Hewlett-Packard HP-18C

Hewlett-Packard HP-20S

Hewlett-Packard HP-21S

Hewlett-Packard HP-21S

Hewlett-Packard HP-22S

Hewlett-Packard HP-25

Hewlett-Packard HP-28S

Hewlett-Packard HP-30S

Hewlett-Packard HP-32SII

Hewlett-Packard HP-35 v2

Hewlett-Packard HP-35 v2

Hewlett-Packard HP-38C

Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV

Hewlett-Packard HP-41CX

Hewlett-Packard HP-42S

Hewlett-Packard HP-45

Hewlett-Packard HP-48G

Hewlett-Packard HP-71B

Hewlett-Packard HP-71B

Hewlett-Packard HP-71B

Hewlett-Packard HP-71B

Hewlett-Packard HP-71B

Hewlett-Packard HP-97

Hewlett-Packard Jornada 548

Hewlett-Packard HP-82240B

Imperial 90S

Key Line Concise 28N

Lotus Flower Abacus

Needham TrigEasy

Novus 850

Olympia CD 100

Prinztronic M500

Psion 3c

Psion 3mx

PYE P-640

Rapid Data Systems Rapidman 800

Rockwell 18R

Santron 20S

Sanyo ICC-802D

Sanyo ICC-1122

Sperry-Remington 661D

Summit Ko8

Texas Instruments TI-1025

Texas Instruments TI-1250

Texas Instruments TI-2500

Texas Instruments TI-2500B

Texas Instruments TI-3500

Unisonic 811

Universal 999

WHS Albert2

Godfrey & Simmonds four-Figure Log Tables 1965

Only few HP and others.



11C

12C (USA)

12C (China)

12C Platinum (Original)

12C Platinum (New - (), undo, backspace)

2 x 15C (use one daily)

16C

2 x 71B (2x 32KB Ram, 2225B ThinkJet)

Jornada 728



TI

TI-65

TI-66

TI-67

TI-74 BASICALC (8kb, 32kb RAM, Modules: Statistics, Mathematics, Finance, Chemical Eng., PC-324 Printer)

TI-95 PROCALC (8kb RAM, Modules: Statistics, Chemical Eng., PC-324 Printer)



PSION

3a

5mx

netBook

netBook Pro

45 different hp units, 5 bought for work, 3 given to me by retiring surveyors, a 33s given to me by hp at the '04 confrence in San Jose, most of the rest found at the flea.

& these- http://www.msdsite.com/forums/upload.php?upload=view&uid=482

Anyone have a non-hp rpn that i don't have who wants to trade?

Edited: 31 Oct 2005, 11:01 p.m.

(3x) HP-48GX (each with 128K & 2048K RAM cards)

(1x) HP-48G (expanded internally to 768K)

(1x) HP-48G+

(1x) HP-49G

(1x) HP-49G+

(1x) HP-41C (with QUAD/HPIL/DEVIL/EXTIO/AUTODUP/GAMES modules)

(1x) HP-6S

(1x) TI-57

(1x) TI-59

(1x) Sharp PC-1251

(1x) Sharp PC-1403

I also have HP-11C, HP-12C, HP-15C, HP-16C, HP-41C/CV/CX, HP-42S and HP-71B (together with almost all available modules and expanded to the maximum amount possible) installed in the virtual form on my three HP-48GXs and HP-49G :-)

Edited: 1 Nov 2005, 4:31 a.m.

Looking in my drawer at work I see:

1x 35 (+1 on my desk)
2x 45 (why 2? Oh, they are different!)
1x 55
1x 41CV
1x 10C
1x 12C
1x 15c
1x 28s
1x 48gx
1x 49g
1x 32sii
1x 20s
1x 21s
1x 6s
There is also a 49g+ in my backpack (and one of the early keyboard at home) and a 33s in my laptop bag. I remember having just fixed a 97 at home and I also have an Xpander at home that I don't really use as it is not so practical. I believe I have a couple more at home that need attending to. This will keep me busy during the long winter nights.
And of course I have nonpareil on my PC and still haven't sent a postcard, shame on me...


Arnaud negotiating for a 33e

(So that is about 20)

Edited: 1 Nov 2005, 4:28 a.m.


I have a lot of HP calculators...


C'mon! why so shy? I just scrolled through the whole post to see your list!

And where are all the other Grand Daddy's? Tony? Diego? Raymond?

Cheers

Peter


Hi Peter

As you know, my favorites are accessories, so if I would cout all my calculators and all their accessories in my collection I would perhaps get a balance of 20% to 80%. I´ve specialized myself in accessories, as I have the different models (ok, some specials too).

As I know Raymond very well, I know he will not publish his collection in the internet and I share his point of view very well.

Diego? I wouldn´t say he is a big collector, more a hardware developper and a shining flower in the big autumn field. He gives us the motivation for keeping our goodies.

Voyagers: 11C, 12C (USA), 12C (China), 15C

Pioneers: ALL

Others: 28S, 48SX, 48G+, 48GX, 33S, 49G+

Recently sold: 12C Platinum (original), 48G, black-faced (low contrast) Pioneers and other duplicates

Looking to buy: 10C, 16C, 41CX or 41CV

Edited: 1 Nov 2005, 7:55 a.m.

my collection pales when compared to the others. I have assembled my fleet of HP's not so much to collect them but to use them.
(1) 11c
(4) 32sii (one of them is the silver bezel)
(3) 33s (bought 2, one sent by HP as a replacement)

Would like to add 15c, another 11c, a 41 series, a 42s, and possibly a 48 series.

My "flagship" is my 32sII from Singapore that has the keys with the molded-in characters. Built in '93, and still going strong. My 11c was my first HP that I bought in college, and while maybe the least capable, I prefer its design.


I am too young to have started with an 11c (5 of my hp calcs are older than me) but however much I like the format of the voyager series, I find them annoyingly slow. Mind you, now that I do most of my work (and play) on the 49g+ I find most of the calculators annoyingly slow. At least the LED calcs are exciting when running programs, not a boring running flashing on the screen.

Arnaud


Quote:
[...] however much I like the format of the voyager series, I find them annoyingly slow.

Yes, they are slow -- HP tried very hard to make them fuel efficient; in the end maybe they tried a bit harder than necessary.


In my college days, when I bought the 10C and 16C, the college bookstore would accelerate voyagers for $30 or thereabouts (they even took over the factory warranty -- pretty sweet deal). There are instructions on the HP Museum site on how to do it yourself, too.


At twice original speed, my 10C felt responsive enough -- still not as fast as the 41CX, but at least not as annoying as the unmodified model.


Wow--some bookstore!

Where was it? MIT? Ecole Polytechnique? (just using stereotypes...)


Delft University of Technology, in the Netherlands.


The book-and-computer store in question is Prins, technically not owned by the university but affiliated.

Disclaimer: I am not affiliated blah blah blah...

2 48GX (one with 128 and 512 cards, other with 128 and 1024 cards )

1 42S

1 41CV (with Adventage module)

1 15C

1 32SII

1 33S (prototype with no serial number)

1 20S

also Casio fx-4000P and fx-6300G

It is easier for me to list what I DON"T HAVE.

Newest models:

Hp9g
Hp9s
Hp48Gii
Hp17Bii+
Hp12cp
Hp40GS

later Hp LCD models

Hp16c
Hp41CX

Older LED's I do not have (my collection is actually quite weak in Hp LED models, though I do have most of the Ti line):

Hp55
Hp65
Hp67
Hp19c
Hp27
Hp29c
Hp31e
Hp34c

I also don't have the following business models, but I don't make to much effort to get them either (but I wouldn't walk away from a cheap one either)

Hp80
Hp70
Hp10
Hp22

So while I am missing quite a few, it is much easier to list the ones I don't have than to count the ones I do have. I also have multiple samples of many of the ones I do have. I do occasionally horse trade, but would feel guilty if I sold any outright (I horde plain and simple), especially at some of the prices they do go for.

These are my HP calculators:
HP-95LX (not a calculator maybe)
HP-48GX
HP-48SX (keyboard not working properly)
HP-42S x 2 (one repaired, but with a column of pixel not working)
HP-41C
HP-28E
HP-20
HP-19BII
HP-12C x 2

Alfredo

Well, lets see, in chronological order:

HP-25
HP-67
HP-41CX Fullnut
HP-41CX halfnut w/ printer, numerous pacs, and card reader
HP-10C (sold)
HP-48GX

I have never been a big fan of the Voyagers, so I did not really enjoy the 10C. I know the form factor made it popular, but after using a 41 I can't go back to non-alpha prompts.

Most of my time is spent between my beloved 41's, and the 48GX. Gee, its too bad when you have to alternate between the best of a couple of eras!

Things to be added might include;

HP-42
HP-32S

And if HP continues along its present path, one or two TIs!

In order of acquisition, my modest collection consists of:

HP-35 (1974…got this from my dad for $100 when he got an HP-45…used it my junior year of high school)
HP-55 (1975…my first new calc, purchased mail-order for $295 from a camera store in NY City…used it my senior of high school and first three years of college…my dad and brother have the only other two I ever saw in use)
HP-34C (1979…bought this at Fresno State for $150 (?) at the start of my senior year of college and used it through my first two years of working as a civil engineer)
HP-41CX (1984…sold my CV+Time+XFun to raise the money ($225?) for this…bought it from Lewis & Lewis in Ventura, CA…I have a modest collection of modules, a card reader, and the 82143 printer…in many ways this is still my favorite)
HP-42S (1987…$105 at the Fresno State bookstore…bought it when I sent my HP-41CX back for repair after removing a speed-up kit and cracking a screw stud…this is still my primary calculator)
HP-48G (bought display unit for $25 from Office Max…on permanent loan to my son)
HP-48G+ (bought new unit for $35 from Office Max when they stopped carrying it…this is my #2 calc)
HP-32Sii (bought for $65 from Office Max when HP announced end of production)
HP-10B (won this a couple of years ago in a contest…a calc dealer in the UK had come across some NIB old stock)

Also, a few years ago my dad gave me his HP-41C. With an HP-28 and HP-48SX, he wasn't using it anymore.

Fred

Not an extensive collection but here it is:

1 10C

1 11C

0 12C (I refuse to own a bean couter's calculator)

2 15C

1 16C

1 35

1 45

1 55

1 65

1 67

1 41CV (my first HP from early 80's)

1 41CX fullnut

1 41CX halfnut

-----------------

13



plus Curta Type I and Curta Type II


Edited: 1 Nov 2005, 10:37 p.m.


The Curtas, though the least capable, might be the most valuable:

Recent eBay Curta auction


A fine article about the Curta ran in Scientific American early this year. Production was discontinued in 1972, when inexpensive "four banger" electronic calculators because available.

I'd say that a Curta is to an good electronic calculator as a fine chronometer is to a quartz-crystal chronograph. Both the Curta and the chronometer are masterpieces of mechanical engineering. However, a quality QC watch keeps time even better, and is much more versatile and economical. Only as piece of status-symbol jewelry (and perhaps in exceptional environments and circumstances) could a mechanical chronometer be considered truly "better".

-- KS


Ah, but the QC watch is mass-produced, so they end up being a "dime a dozen" almost literally. The fine swiss movement in the expensive chronometer is a marvel not only of mechanical engineering, but of manual tweaking and stroking by a master craftsman. Such care doesn't come cheap, and more to the point, is limited. So the supply of the fine swiss movement in the expensive chronometer is limited. Supply and demand take over, and the superior time measuring device is valued less in currency terms than the less accurate device. I know which one I'd rather have with me when seconds really matter, though.

The Curta machines are in limited supply, and are marvelous and ingenious devices. They have also been the objects of collector interest for much longer than our calculators. This probably means that a larger percentage of the available macines are already in collections, compared to the numbers for our hobby interests. Smaller supply and a longer established collector market help explain the high prices.

But I'm pretty sure there never was a Curta watch. 8)

Edited: 2 Nov 2005, 1:32 a.m.

Two years ago, a surveyor whom I had previously written two surveying programs for free for his CASIO PB-700 offered me a Curta Type II absolutely mint, with case and original manual in Portuguese for about ...$20.00! I told him that was not my preferred kind of calculator, I even told him collectors would pay him more... I even made some additions and subtractions on it, a true mechanical pocket calculator!

Gerson.

Warning! This is how sick you can get if you don't exercise control soon.

Manf	Model	Serial Number
HP HP 10 1802S12635
HP HP 19C 1801A01276
HP HP 19C 1905S10531
HP HP 21 1809B77988
HP HP 21 1605A03387
HP HP 22 1510A01271
HP HP 25 1509A29928
HP HP 25 1602A00385
HP HP 25 1510A32545
HP HP 25C 1610A02831
HP HP 29C 1801A01276
HP HP 31 E 2005S30898
HP HP 31 E 1933S31058
HP HP 32 E 2116S37662
HP HP 33 C 2135S32552
HP HP 33 E 1926A32478
HP HP 33 E 1918A77508
HP HP 34C no num
HP HP 35 1346A 27901
HP HP 35 1302A 81207
HP HP 37 E 2219S30802
HP HP 38 C 2245S31622
HP HP 38 E 1919A91129
HP HP 45 1350A 30984
HP HP 46 1314A00983
HP HP 46 1314A03836
HP HP 55 1504A03151
HP HP 65 1333A20903
HP HP 67 140357
HP HP 67 1812A00628
HP HP 80 1247A 53920
HP HP 91 1704S70110
HP HP 92 1708A01453
HP HP 97 1804A01292
HP HP 97 A 1904S90738
HP HP 49 G+
HP HP 49 G ID93604509
HP HP 48 G II
HP HP 48 G+ 1094305784
HP HP 48 G 3523S05719
HP HP 48 G 3425S11397
HP HP 48 G 3426S02284
HP HP 48 SX 3237S02059
HP HP 48 S 3305S04603
HP HP 48 S 3225S03368
HP HP 42S 3047S07714
HP HP 41 CX BN 2808S20731
HP HP 41 CX 2629S20149
HP HP 41 CX 2443S43893
HP HP 41 CX 2646S21910
HP HP 41 CV 2219S45020
HP HP 41 CV 2607S21336
HP 82104A 2037S45060
HP HP 41 CV 2215S42911
HP HP 41 C 2003A01562
HP HP 40G CN02302635
HP HP 39 G CN02007821
HP HP 39 G CN02005809
HP HP 39 G+
HP HP 38 G 3529S10548
HP HP 38 G 3525S03430
HP HP 33S
HP HP 32 S II 1D11000352
HP HP 32 S II ID73612032
HP HP 32 S II ID92505347
HP HP 32 S 3007S02601
HP HP 30 S CN 0014
HP HP 28 S 3010A38022
HP HP 28 C 2707A05452
HP HP 28 C 2724A02178
HP HP 27S 2813A03739
HP HP 22 S 2821A05273
HP HP 21 S 3131S00476
HP HP 20 S ID84810754
HP HP 20 S 3603M04136
HP HP 19 B II 3004A03891
HP HP 19 B II 2826A29438
HP HP 19 B II 3348S02529
HP HP 18 C 2638A35044
HP HP 18 C 2643A03535
HP HP 17BII 3551M05198
HP HP 17 B 2812A05036
HP HP 17 B 2916S31160
HP HP 16 C 2343A05782
HP HP 15 C 2709A03027
HP HP 14B 2902A31879
HP HP 14B 2910A13775
HP HP 12 C 2227A07128
HP HP 12 C MY83904467
HP HP 12 C 2650B50917
HP HP 12 C MY81807711
HP HP 12 C MY83003613
HP HP 11 C 2315A00239
HP HP 11 C 2626A57293
HP HP 10 C 2247A04050
HP HP 10 C SN removed
HP HP 10 B ID94009435
HP HP 10 B 3421S80368
HP HP 10 B Unkn Pkgd
HP HP 10 B II CN10300362
HP HP 9G
HP HP 9S
HP HP 6 S CN10006
HP HP 6 S CN100001
HP HP 6 S
HP HP 6 S Solar
HP HP Expander
HP 82240A 2727S10938
HP 82240A 2714S10470
HP 82240A 2818S11262
HP 82143A 1938A98972
HP 82162A 2231S87995
HP 82161A 2152A00555
HP HP 82153A Wand
HP 92910A Wand
HP HP 82420A 4K Mem / 71 B
HP Card Reader 2037S45060
HP HP 82169A 2627A04164
HP HP 82169A 2922A02279
HP Circuits I
HP X Func
HP HPIL Dev
HP HP 71 B 2643A00029
HP HP 75 D 2627A12928
HP 82718A 2622A61728
HP 92267B xxx
HP HP 75C
HP HP 94E 2633J00972
HP HP 1000 CX SG61403170
HP HP 120LX SG62800589
HP HP 200 LX SG53900102
HP HP 300LX SG72301063
HP HP 320LX
HP HP 95 LX ABA3147A02862
HP HP 95 LX ABA3133A03069
HP OmniGo 100 SG60400030
HP OmniGo 120 SG62800589
Little Prof LT USA437L
Speak& Math USA137A
SR 10 340348
SR 40 033502 ATA3978
SR 50 173150
SR 50 113808
TI 1001 ATA3681
TI 1500 1500 513242
TI 1750 #127 924393
TI 1766 II I 1288
TI 25 Stat N-0196
TI 25X Solar in pkg
TI 2500 Datamath 2500-328587
TI 30 0012229 ATA0179
TI 30 2871582 ATA0879
TI 30 Stat RCI 25 92
TI 30X RCI 23 04 93
TI 30X IIS G-0401A
TI 30Xa N0298
TI 30Xa ATA 0879
TI 30Xa N-0298
TI 34 I-0493
TI 35 9752206 ATA 0583
TI 36X Solar RC1030594
TI 36X Solar RC1030594
TI 50 1114715 LTA4778
TI 5025 3629407
TI 5033 SV T-0795B
TI 5038 I 0689
TI 5100 2196757
TI 5230 1456073
TI 55 2170515 ATA1280
TI 55 127338 ATA2178
TI 55 0866679 LTA1278
TI 55 II LTA 2484
TI 55 II 1925856-LTA1184
TI 57 1074794 ATA4081
TI 58 9143579 ATA2778
TI 58 & 59 Master Lib
TI 58 C 7375351 ATA1480
TI 59 2141236 ATA3878
TI 74 0008430
TI 82 32406894
TI 82 48117123
TI 82 32635796
TI 82 961365
TI 82 54492377 1-0497R
TI 83 46227332 1-0999N
TI 83 + 1187016714-0300A
TI 83 + 11820167141-300A
TI 83 + 225800412S-0302C
TI 83 + 1202027134 I-0500A
TI 85 955668
TI 85 610413
TI 85 41060432 CBL1=04961
TI 86 02404691 1-0697B
TI 86 19217797 1=1198K
TI BA 35 LT A 3485 USA
TI BA-35 1510028
TI BA-35 NONE
TI BA-35
TI BAII Plus RCI 49 91
TI BAII Plus S-0302A
TI BAII Plus 0011777 S-0200
TI BAII Plus $3,840.00
TI Bus. Analyst - I 1078343
TI Business Analyst II 1478750 ATA1182
TI Collegiate NONE
TI Collegiate 1-1188
TI Datachron 53214
TI Financial Invest. Analyst 071 79136
TI MBA 3477769ATA1682
TI MBA 7647313 LTA 1878
TI PC 324 0036503
TI Programmer 14196
TI SR 40 6496093
TI Student Bus. Consultant 8243768-A1A2583
TI Student Bus. Consultant 8243768-A1A2583
TI T-1220 A 837886
Bowmar 901B none
Canon TP-8 none
Casio FX-300W
Casio FX-750P
Casio fx-155MS
Casio fx-7000G`
Casio fx-7400G
Casio fx-115d
Casio fx-250HC
Casio PV-S400 plus
Casio fx-7400G+
Casio HR-150LA
Casio HR-10
Commodore US*1 G29855
Commodore Minute Man 2 R325818
Knight K-37 none
Radio Shack EC 495 12294
Radio Shack EC 4024 6A8
Radio Shack EC 4033 6A5
Rockwell 61R 152444
Rockwell 9TR 132979
Rockwell 9TR 264927
Rockwell 24K II 137125096
Rockwell 63R 255979
Rockwell 44RD 113257046
Sharp EL-470 86095213
Sharp EL-506A 93014
Sharp EL 512
Sharp EL 546 G
Sharp EL 620 1101297V
Sharp EL-505
Sharp EL-505
Toshiba LC-843WA 108277
Cannon P20DX 90404605
Cannon TP-8 none
LeWorld 250 Orig Pkg
Panasonic 601
Miida MC830K
Panasonic HHC
Printer Cassette Interface 21026272
Radio Shack TRS-80 19011992
Sharp CE 126P 4704152X
Sharp CE 125P
Sharp PC 1250A
Sharp PC 1500
Sharp CE 150
Sharp EL 5500 II
Tandy PC-4
Casio SF 5980
Casio Cassiopedia
Palm Pilot Palm III 106V1BT763HH
Radio Shack EC 332
Royal RG135nx
TI PS3960i 0036503 C-1196A

Edited: 1 Nov 2005, 11:56 p.m.


Dear HP handheldcomputer enthusiasts :-)

my own collection is limited to the HP41CX modell. I have some of them including the HP41CY.
Furthermore exist some W&W and Eramco RAM-Box systems, Hepax, Zeprom, Clonix, NoVRAM and a collection of the standard plug in modules and Double-X-Memory.

There also exist a collection of HP-IL equipmemt which is compatible to the HP41, including IL-Plotter, IL-Digitalmultimeter, IL-Datalogger and CMT-RAM-Disk.

Main interest are hardware interface applications with HP41 system -most of you know the nice modular I/O-Board and the powerfully IL2000 interface system. For example with the IL2000 system I create an audio measurement system. For any of this systems are manuals and parts available.

The greatest and heaviest hardware device I designed for the HP41 is an HP-IL controlled labor measurement system (power supply + generator + counter + voltmeter).

A key-function for today HP41 applications is PC interfacing, I use the fantastic EMU41 emulator software in combination with the rebuild version of the HP-IL/PC interface card, which is available from me.

Last not least I have a nice collection of HP41 books and manuals, here I only miss the English paper version of the CCD-Module manual :-(

Best wishes - Christoph Klug


Most collectors seem to be non HP exclusive (my case too), as there were about 80 different HP calculators made and probably 5000+ from other brands, that is quite understandable. This is probably why there are few or no HP zealots (as opposed to fans) here.

I have about 30 models made by HP, I like more LED types but they are harder to get. On the other hand, later LCD models are not really collectable (past the 41), with exceptions like the 71B.

Another trend is that if I have the 'higher-end' model, I don't need the more limited one, like HP34C compared to HP33C (in that particular case, an HP31E would still be desirable due to rarity of course). The same is true for HP48GX : no need for G, S, G+, etc.

I wonder if it is a sign that you are a 'newcomer' to collecting if you have the complete list of recent models but little on the LED side ? I know I bought most second hand, but some new if they were available at the time I was already biten by "the bug" (and wealthy enough...).

Some have carefully updated databases (that's part of the joy of collecting for sure), I rather rely on 'visual memory' to know if I already have an item.

My current use of HP models is a 6S as a scratch-pad for very low-level calculations I do at work, the 48GX for more involved leisure math, or the 71B for programming (the 48 being write-only IMHO). Recently I dusted off my 42S, but being stored without batteries it was missing my essential toolbox, and typing all again was too big a task, so I just played a bit.

Hello Chris,
You seem to have extinsive knowledge on the HP-IL interface.
I have a 2671G thermal printer with HP-IB. The manual has an entire section devoted to HP-IK interfacing but no mention of a model option. Any Ideas here why a section in the manual?

Just amazing...

Ah well, my "collection" is rather limited. I guess that I'm not really very interested in "collecting" just for the sake of collecting, but rather I want "useful" things, and have sentimental feelings for things that I once found very useful, but have been superceded by "better" models.

HP models:

12C
16C
28C
28S
48SX
48GX
49G
49g+
82240A printers
82240B printers
Various accessories, such as cards, cords, and adapters for the 48 and 49 series.

For the HPs, I'm undecided whether the 48SX or the 48GX is most useful. I think that the 49g+ is even more fun to play around with than the 49G.

I'd love to have a 15C, which may well be the all-around most useful
"shirt-pocket-sized" calculator ever made, but my budget is very limited.

Sharp: EL-5520 handheld calculator/BASIC computer, and accessories such as the printer/cassette interface, a genuine Sharp cassette recorder, and level shifters for RS-232 communications. I doubt that I'll ever really "use" them again, but they were marvelous when I got them.

Radio Shack model EC-4004 (rebadged Casio?) keystroke programmable scientific (circa 1990), and Lloyd's model E608 "4-banger" plus square root and percentage keys (circa 1980). The surprising thing about these two is that they're still working with the original batteries.

I just discovered a spare CR 2025 cell for the Radio Shack tucked into the case. I purchased this well over a decade ago, just in case the battery went dead during an ASQC exam.

Various "El Cheapo" models.

I think that I have an electro-mechanical adding machine somewhere in this big old house, or maybe I lent it to my brother. I suppose that I should look for it, one of these days.

Regards,
James


Edited: 2 Nov 2005, 8:21 a.m.

Hi, Will & all:

Just for the record, my 'hardware' HP calcs collection consists of:

   1 x HP-10C
2 x HP-11C
3 x HP-12C
3 x HP-15C
1 x HP-16C
1 x HP-25
1 x HP-28S
1 x HP-32S
1 x HP-32SII
1 x HP-41CX + Card Reader + Advantage ROM + PPC ROM
1 x HP-42S
3 x HP-71B + 168 Kb RAM + Card Reader + Math ROM + HP-IL ROM
that's 19 machines, all of them with full manuals, cases (inc. leather cases), etc., everything in mint condition.

I also own SHARPs (40 in all, including such superb machines as the SHARP EL-5101, which is allegedly one of the most beautiful advanced scientific calculators ever made, and the 20-digit, BASIC-programmable with microcoded matrix operations built-in SHARP PC-1475), TRS (4), Casio (one, the absolutely awesome Casio FX-7500G), and assorted machines of other brands. I also have a Casio PB-2000C on permanent loan. This is a handheld, similar in size to an HP-71B but with a much larger, 4-line display that it's actually programmable in C (!!). It also admits plug-in ROMs, including a BASIC ROM.

Edited: 2 Nov 2005, 6:08 a.m.


Hello, the 5101 is nice but how about the 5100, the ORIGINAL machine that started it all. See also the last member of the family, the 5150, much better but quite not so much personality of course.

The PB2000C is nice too, and there was a Prolog module available ("available" being an overstatement as I have never even *heard* of one anywhere). Again, there is the much better fx890P, featuring C, BASIC, CASL *and* assembler out of the box, 64K available to the user... but lots less personality.

I guess our own personal history dictates what we feel is nice, actually.


Hi, GE:

GE posted:


"the 5101 is nice but how about the 5100, the ORIGINAL machine that started it all."

Wish I had one but no such luck yet. Adding insult to injury, I have one good friend of mine which has one in good shape, and I happen to own *two* 5101, also mint. But he won't trade ...

"The PB2000C is nice too, and there was a Prolog module available ("available" being an overstatement as I have never even *heard* of one anywhere)."

I've never seen the BASIC module either, but it seems it actually did exist, I've seen the manual.


Again, there is the much better fx890P, featuring C, BASIC, CASL *and* assembler out of the box, 64K available to the user... but lots less personality."

Indeed, it's mostly about 'personality'. For instance, I know for sure all RPL models are far more capable than, say, an HP-15C or HP42S. Yet I'd never trade any number of them for a single 15C or 42S. Nor for an HP-25 for that matter.

Best regards from V.


The 25 is just *too* cool. Way too cool. Could never trade that if I had one.

http://www.hpmuseum.org/3qs/253q.jpg

The beginning of the ultimate pocked programmable. Got to get one!


They're not hard to get... I got one on eBay for $33 about a year ago. Works great; still as much fun as in 1977. :-)


Of course you have to be prepared to wade through page after page of outboard engines and inkjet cartridges before you find an actual HP-25 *calculator*!


This is how I keep my eBay search results on topic:

(hp-29, hp29, hp-29c, hp29c) (calc*,Taschenrechner,Rechner) -drucker* -farb* -tinte* -ink* -ink -cartridge* -patrone* -Tintenpatrone* -Leerpatrone* -Druckpatrone* -Druckerpatrone* -patrone* -ml -deskjet -printer -nachf* -refill


Quote:
This is how I keep my eBay search results on topic:

(hp-29, hp29, hp-29c, hp29c) (calc*,Taschenrechner,Rechner) -drucker* -farb* -tinte* -ink* -ink -cartridge* -patrone* -Tintenpatrone* -Leerpatrone* -Druckpatrone* -Druckerpatrone* -patrone* -ml -deskjet -printer -nachf* -refill


Nice to see nearly my same ebay filter here in hpmusuem...

...it seems we all have the same problems! :D

Valentino

Ahh yes...my first HP was a 25c, bought new in '76. Shortly thereafter the 29c came out and of course that was a MUST HAVE, so I scraped $195 together and got one (I still have it), and sold the 25c (why!! why!! did I do that!!). One of my classmates who sat behind me had a 67, and I'd hear him running the card reader all the time (he must have been from a rich family, because $450 was a chunk of change back then!!) My envy was assuaged, however, by the fact I had continous memory and he didn't!!
Am still looking to add a 67 to my humble collection, but they cost almost as much now as they did then!!
Regards, Hal


It's still quite a chunk a change today...

... which is why for all the criticism of models like the 33S and 49G+, the beauty of these is that they do put affordable and really, serviceable RPN models with the reach of many.

Quote:

"the 5101 is nice but how about the 5100, the ORIGINAL machine that started it all."

Wish I had one but no such luck yet. Adding insult to injury, I have one good friend of mine which has one in good shape, and I happen to own *two* 5101, also mint. But he won't trade ...


You mean like this one?

Three days left, as of post time.

Hi!

My owns are:

1   12C
1 15C
1 17BII
1 28C
1 32SII (Blue-Orange)
1 41CV (may I will give an another with printer and tape :P )
1 48SX

I sold, or traded:

1   10C
2 38G :'( snif, snif... --- OK, I know it's not a big deal,
but it was a total heart-eclipse (BT rlz)
and I WANT TO buy a new again (help me, please)!
2 45
1 48G (I hate pop-up windows...)
1 48GX (...and filling-forms... ;) )

And the "others":

1   CASIO FX-850P with +8K RAM (my first...)
1 CASIO FX-750P
1 CASIO FX-4200P
1 CASIO FX-4500P
1 CASIO FX-50f (a great machine - and what a slim!!!)
2 Texas Instruments TI57LCD (damaged keypad)
1 PSION LZ-64 Organiser
1 PSION Revo 8M Organiser (exploded state)

In Hungary may impossible to find old HPs, so I think, I'm very fortunate with this collection...

Csaba

In five short years...

HP 48G (had a 48GX but lost it), 49G+, 39G+, 17BII+ ('03), 12CP ('03), 20S, 39G, 9G. I hope to own the 42S one day, although I have the Free 42.


LOL!

Any calc with a button marked "FIRE" has got to be worth getting! It may work well in environments with horrible coworkers.

Hi all,
I couldn't agree more, such a pity it was only a joke. My attraction to its features may explain my collection of nine HP67s. Internal card reader, LED display, RPN, built like a tank, built to last and last and last!! They also come in handy for mature age engineering ungrads who want to impress pretty young things at lab time. I blame my university tutor and his TI30 for my addiction to these things.

Regards Paul


<Incredulous>
You mean a TI-30 started you off toward the finer calculators???!!!
</Incredulous>

Here we go: (in technologic order, I guess...)

1       55
1 97
1 31E
1 34C
1 37E
1 38E
2 38C
2 41C (fullnut) + 82143A + 82104A + 82153A + Financial ROM
2 41CV (1 full-, 1 halfnut) + MLDL2000 + NoV32 (both to be delivered)
2 41CX (1 full-, 1 halfnut) + HPIL + 82242A + Navigation ROM
1 75D (?)
1 71B (?) + IL + Card Reader
1 10C
1 11C
3 12C
2 12C Platinum (?)
3 15C
3 16C
1 28S
1 42S
1 14B
1 48SX
2 48G+
1 17BII
1 19BII
2 49G
1 10BII
1 33S
1 49G+
1 48GII
2 39G+
(HP or not HP...)
1       30S
1 9S
2 9G
other brands:
1       TI55
1 TI57
1 TI58C (bad mem chips)
1 TI59 + PC100C
1 TI82
1 Casio fx7000GA (interesting model, indeed)
That´s all, folks. This is almost complete, I am almost sure I missed something. I also have many original HP manuals and a few original boxes.


Edited: 3 Nov 2005, 2:13 p.m.

The focus of my collection is what I consider the "golden era" of HP calculators -- mature and (mostly) well-engineered and well-documented products introduced between 1979-1993. This era includes the the HP-41, the Spice, Voyager and Pioneer series, all Saturn-processor models, and all the original RPL-based models.

I do also have a few models from outside that period, as well as a few low-end non-HP's.

This is not to imply that the other major manufacturers did not also have some fine products. It's just that HP's "golden era" produced the complete package of excellence in all-American engineering -- design, mechanical quality, mathematical algorithms, and documentation. RPN was an important bonus.

Hewlett-Packard:

Classic (1971-74): 35

Spice (1978-79): 34C (3)

Coconut (1979-83): 41C, 41CV, 41CX

Voyager (1981-82): 10C, 11C (2), 12C (2), 15C, 16C

BASIC computer: 71B (+ Math)

Pioneer (1988-91): 10B, 14B, 17BII, 20S, 21S, 27S, 32S, 32SII, 42S

RPL-based (1986-98): 28C (2), 48G, 49G

Other (ahem) "HP": 33S, 6S

The Others:

Casio fx-3600P, fx-115MS

Texas Instruments TI-36X

Rockwell 18R

Le World scientific


Quote:
The focus of my collection is what I consider the "golden era" of HP calculators (...)

then you must have some Woodstocks, mustn't you?


...after all, their namesake bird from "Peanuts" is indeed yellow in color!

All kidding aside, I don't have any Woodstock-series models (21, 22, 25, 25C, 27, 29C) or 67/97's, which are based on Woodstock internals.

Granted, these models have their fans (take a look at the above posts from Paul and Bill Platt in this thread). As impressive as the 67 was, and as "clean" as the 25/25C was, I can't quite consider any of the LED models as the acme of refinement or practicality. The LCD made further significant advancement possible in those areas.

It's true that the HP-67 was built solidly, and had impressive functionality for its era. I actually wouldn't mind getting one as an example of quite likely the best LED handheld calculator ever made. However:

  • It's long and heavy, with both a rechargeable battery and an internal card reader to deal with and maintain.
  • Its Application Pac software are RPN routines stored on magnetic cards, instead of machine-coded programs on plug-in modules.
  • It has "stiletto-heel" arithmetic keys on the left side, which is wrong for right-handers.
  • It has a busy-looking faceplate with ugly brown keys. Many basic functions are shifted.

The HP-25 and -25C have a clean, compact form factor and good construction. But its programming functions make some basic functions shifted; the programming paradigm itself is the crude one from the HP-55. Its keyboard arrangement is very similar to that of the compact HP-34C, which has better programming along with SOLVE and INTEG to make full use of it. (Now, if only the mechanical design weren't so flawed...)

No, I'd say the 1980's and early 1990's was the real "golden age" of HP calc's, when traditional quality converged with unquestioned practicality and affordability.

-- KS


re: "It has "stiletto-heel" arithmetic keys on the left side, which is wrong for right-handers. "

Depends, IMHO.

Perhaps for (right-handed) touch typists, the math keys should be on the right of the numbers, but for us right-handed "hunt and peckers," I prefer those keys to the left of the numbers, where I can see them unblocked by my hand, and where I hit them with my thumb or index finger (which produce a firmer push than my little finger!). Maybe that's why I prefer my 11C and 41CX to my 32S and 42S.

What do the "lefties" out there think about this?


Ooops - the 11C has the arithmetic operations (+ - x /) are on the "wrong" side, too.


Quote:
Ooops - the 11C has the arithmetic operations (+ - x /) are on the "wrong" side, too.

... but you prefer it as you mentioned one post earlier. So there must be another reason ;-)

Hi, Karl:

Nice collection you have. Mine is complete (i.e., I already
own all HP models I care for) except for an HP-34C and an HP-67.
May I suggest you should try getting an HP28S. I see you
own two HP28C, but the 28S is the much superior model, IMHO.

As for other brands, I would heartily recommend that you get some of these SHARP models:

  PC-1211/1212: first dot-matrix LCD BASIC handheld, metallic,
slim, extremely beautiful and capable

PC-1261/1262: ditto, much smaller but 15 times faster, 7 times
more RAM and with a much better BASIC.

PC-1421: ditto, specialized financial functions (a la HP-12C)
but with the power of BASIC language programming

PC-1425: ditto, specialized statistical functions, again
perfectly integrated with BASIC programming.

PC-E500/S: less fancy looks, but 4 lines x 40 char
alphanumeric & graphic display, and the fastest
BASIC language handheld of its time: more than
5 times faster than the HP-71B and faster than
most other models, including the HP-75, 28S,
32S, 42S, you name it. It also includes extremely
useful program libraries built-in in ROM, etc.

Of course there are many other worthwhile models, but I humbly suggest that you try and get some of these. They can be had very cheap in eBay Germany, for instance, and if you manage to get a near mint, working one, you're bound to be delighted and awed by their quality of build and performance. I did show some of mine to a number of HP-loving friends and acquaintances, and most of them turned into SHARP 'lovers' as well. Ah, and all of these models do have full I/O capabilities.

As for pure programming fun (challenges & all), have a look at what you can do with the very simplest, less capable model listed above, namely the circa 1980 SHARP PC-1211. This 9-liner solves the NxN Chess Queens puzzle for arbitrary N, without recursion (RUN "A"):

  1 A(Y)=A(Y)+1: IF A(Y)>X LET Y=Y-1: GOTO 1
2 GOTO 5
3 "A" CLEAR: INPUT "N=";X: Y=1: WAIT
4 A(Y)=1
5 IF Y=1 GOTO 8
6 FOR Z=1 TO Y-1: IF (A(Z)=A(Y))+(Y-Z=ABS(A(Z)-A(Y))) LET Z=Y: NEXT Z: GOTO 1
7 NEXT Z
8 Y=Y+1: IF Y<=X GOTO 4
9 USING: FOR W=1 TO X: PRINT "Queen at ";W;A(W): NEXT W: Y=Y-2: GOTO 1
I think that a person like you, who loves challenges and math and programming would love to try these machines, either for real or for pure fun.

Best regards from V.


Hi Valentin,

I have a PC-1250 which I bought for $4.00 or something like that--no manual but it has its original slipcase. (It belonged to another amateur radio operator---as you know there are a lot of us on this forum!)

It looks very much like the 1261 but is missing the DEG RAD GRAD and a few other "commands" printed on the face--

I have not used it much, but I wonder how much it is "missing" from the 1261?

It looks to have I/O and everything! I suppose there must be some sort of interface and cable -- maybe to write / read from a compact cassette drive?

Nicely made. The buttons aren't HP but they seem to be pretty reliable.

It is the start of my SHARP collection (well, actually my wife started it--with her little elsi-mate that is still going strong since about 1982--with its original battery--amazingly enough it looks to be a single aaa alkaline cell! I still have not replaced it because it just keeps on working...)

Regards,

Bill

Edited: 4 Nov 2005, 2:59 p.m.


PC 1500A
PC 1360

and

PC 1600 !!!! (For me the first among all. . .)

Hello, Valentin --

Thank you for the compliment and the links to some of the advanced models of calculators from Sharp. I looked through Archives 13 and 14, revisiting many interesting old threads, in search of this:

POST: Valentin's Sharp calculators

which sprung from an earlier "What's in your calc collection?" thread.

Yes, the machines certainly look impressive, and doubtless offer -- as you described -- certain functionality and capabilities that no HP models had. If the prices are reasonable, I might even get one or two, in order to have an example of a high-end non-HP product.

However, I doubt that I would indulge a hobby of high-end Sharps as you have. My interests lean more toward what I consider the best pure calculators, not the vintage pocket/handheld computers that run BASIC. I do have the HP-71B with the Math ROM and all the manuals, but am barely competent with it. Eventually, I'll learn from those excellent manuals (and your posts!) how to use it properly; that will keep me busy enough when I undertake that task.

Quote:
May I suggest you should try getting an HP28S. I see you own two HP28C, but the 28S is the much superior model, IMHO.

I like the 28 for its advanced unit conversions/definitions and not having an ALPHA mode to remember; I keep one at work.

I once summarized the main differences between the 28C and 28S was the RAM (2 kB vs. 32 kB), directories on the 28S, added functions (e.g., PERM and COMB), and a slightly faster processor. Is that list accurate? If so, then I'd have little need for a 28S, since I already have a 48G and 49G.

Quote:
...you're bound to be delighted and awed by their quality of build and performance (of Sharp pocket computers). I did show some of mine to a number of HP-loving friends and acquaintances, and most of them turned into SHARP 'lovers' as well.

Hmm, I dunno. No RPN? Also, I'd be real surprised if the quality of their mechanical engineering and ergononomics matches that of the HP's from the 1980's. Long-term durability and repairability is an issue now, given the age of these devices. And, I'd be absolutely stunned if the documentation measured up to that of the 71B, 71B Math ROM, HP-41, HP-15...

Quote:
They can be had very cheap in eBay Germany,

But the shipping to the USA might be a hassle, and I'd have to refer occasionally to my German-English dictionary if discussions with the seller were needed... ;-)

Quote:
I think that a person like you, who loves challenges and math and programming would love to try these machines, either for real or for pure fun.

I'd characterize myself as mainly a pragmatist (although I admit to having engaged in philosophical disputes on the Fourm from time to time). My programming endeavors emphasize my own professional applications, such as this one for my primary workplace calculator:

PROGRAM: AC Power Transfer for HP-32SII

I also have developed a working and more-extensive version of this program for the HP-42S, but it's not yet "ready for prime time". Adequate documentation would be a real chore.

I've also got several useful programs in mind for the HP-16C, once I understand the commands more fully.

My postings on mathematics have focused on fundamental definitions and computational algorithms on HP calculators:

POST: j^j on the 33S

POST: Hyperbolics with Advantage

And here's my discussion and basic technique for using SOLVE and INTEG:

ARTICLE: SOLVE and INTEG on RPN-based HP's

I do enjoy studying and reading your challenges and detailed answers, but generally leave the "doing" to others (some of whom have already accomplished them by the time I read them...)

-- Best regards from Karl S.

Edited: 6 Nov 2005, 3:41 p.m.


Hi again, Karl:

Karl posted:

"If the prices are reasonable, I might even get one or two, in order to have an example of a high-end non-HP product."

By all means do, but I'd suggest you get first one of the models I mentioned. They're the more likely to make a positive impression on you, and we all know that first impressions are what counts.

"I once summarized the main differences between the 28C and 28S was the RAM (2 kB vs. 32 kB) [...]"

The ratio is even worse, because 1/4 of those meager 2 Kb were permanently reserved for the operating system, thus leaving no more than 1.5 Kb for the user, which was absolutely insufficient. Mr. Wicked himself said that its RAM resources would compare to a bare bones 41C with no extra RAM at all, and that was insufficient to run most complex HP-67 programs.

"Hmm, I dunno. No RPN? "

You can easily search for my opinion on RPN in the MoHP's Archives so no need to repeat it here. Among my frequent posts, the one discussing HP's "Mach's number example" is the best summarization of my views.

"Also, I'd be real surprised if the quality of their mechanica engineering and ergononomics matches that of the HP's from
the 1980's. Long-term durability and repairability is an issue now, given the age of these devices."

Don't be so surprised. SHARP have been pioneers in electronics since old, and theirs are the very first LCD displays. Their first handheld 'computer', the venerable SHARP PC-1211, was offering a 24-character alphanumeric, dot matrix LCD display and BASIC in ROM in a slim, metallic body, with full I/O to mass storage and printer integrated back in 1980+, at a time where the HP-41C did with a 12-character, segmented LCD display and RPN in a plastic body, with I/O to mass storage and printer requiring expensive accessories with their own external ROMs. Not that I would compare both products or suggest that one is better than the other, they're simply in different leagues, but the SHARP's model hardware and build quality are perfectly comparable or even surpass the HP model.

As for durability and repairability, all my SHARPS do work perfectly, keyboards and all, despite being 15, 20, 25 years old. Still shiny as new, as well. You can open them up by simply unscrewing some perfectly normal screws, you can peek at the insides and even do your own things there, if you want to, such as internally wiring more RAM, etc, as long as you know what you're doing. They mostly use standard components.

"And, I'd be absolutely stunned if the
documentation measured up to that of the 71B, 71B Math ROM, HP-41, HP-15... "

The documentation is perfectly good. The SHARP PC-1211, for instance, came with a big User Manual, full of detailed examples, plus another big book with *over a hundred* programs
in all cathegories, mainly engineering, maths, statistics, etc, many of them suitably long and well written. After having a look at the dismayingly *bad* and insufficient "Standard Pac" which came with my newly acquired HP-41C, I was more than delighted with the SHARP PC-1211's equivalent, which would run rings around HP's offering both in terms of sheer number of programs featured and their quality and documentation. Not only would you learn from them, you'd actually *use* them (for instance, there was a program to solve linear systems up to 11x11).

You can see the quality and thoroughness of their documentation for yourself by having a look at this, which is the whole manual for one of the models I heartily recommended (SHARP PC-E500, the 'engineering' model) in English language, PDF format (6 Mb approx.):

SHARP PC-E500 Operation Manual

I think you'll agree with me it's perfectly good, adequate and comprehensive documentation for this superb machine.

"I do enjoy studying and reading your challenges and detailed answers, but generally leave the "doing" to others (some of whom have already accomplished them by the time I read them...) "

Well, I suppose doing so has its advantages as well, though you'll miss the fun of confronting an interesting problem and actually finding a solution.

Thanks for your kind opinions and

Best regards from V.

Well, many folks here had already say all of that I also would comment on our calculators. So I restrict my post only to the list:

hp12C

hp15C

hp16C

hp17BII *)

hp20S

hp27S *)

hp32SII

hp41CV *) + many peripherals

hp48SX *)

hp48GX *)

*) hp82440B printer for all marked calculators

I won't post my list, since it might wear out your mouse scroll wheel ;)

(estimated 50 HP calcs only though)

still missing that red dot 35 - that's the last calc on my "important calculators" list


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