Quiz: HP Voyagers!



#2

Fans of the HP-10C/11C/12C/15C/16C:

Here is a modest quiz about functionality of the five Voyager models. If you're interested, see how many you can answer without downloading the MoHPC's photos...

Answers with background and insight will be provided shortly in a separate post.

1. Which model(s) provide all twelve conditional tests?

2. Which model(s) provide only eight conditional tests?

3. Which model(s) provide only two conditional tests?

4. Which model(s) do not provide insert/delete program editing?

5. Which model(s) do not provide a "delete digit" function?

6. Which model(s) do not provide any loop-counter functions?

7. Which model(s) provide Solve, Integrate, matrix functions, and functions using complex-valued inputs?

8. Which model(s) provide an "exchange with memory register" function?

9. Which model(s) do not provide trigonometeric functions?

10. Which model(s) do not provide logarithmic or exponential functions?

11. Which model(s) provide a "modulo division" function?

12. Which model(s) allow "F" as a program label?

13. Which model(s) provide a y-estimator regression function?

Good luck!

-- KS

Edited: 29 Aug 2005, 10:23 p.m.


#3

Hi, Karl;

1. Which model(s) provide all twelve conditional tests?

HP15C

2. Which model(s) provide only eight conditional tests?

HP11C and HP16C

3. Which model(s) provide only two conditional tests?

HP10C, Hp12C and Platinum (should it be considered?)

4. Which model(s) do not provide insert/delete program editing?

HP10C and HP12C and Platinum

5. Which model(s) do not provide a "delete digit" function?

HP10C and HP12C and Platinum

6. Which model(s) do not provide any loop-counter functions?

HP12C and Platinum

7. Which model(s) provide Solve, Integrate, matrix functions, and functions using complex-valued inputs?

Hp15C

8. Which model(s) provide an "exchange with memory register" function?

HP15C (if we consider x<>(i) and x<>(I), HP11C and HP16C)

9. Which model(s) do not provide trigonometeric functions?

HP16C, HP12C and Platinum

10. Which model(s) do not provide logarithmic or exponential functions?

HP16C

11. Which model(s) provide a "modulo division" function?

HP16C

12. Which model(s) allow "F" as a program label?

HP16C

13. Which model(s) provide a y-estimator regression function?

HP12C and Platinum

Any prize? (kidding...)

(one edition...)

Edited: 29 Aug 2005, 10:35 p.m.


#4

My 15C only has x=0, x<=y and F? on the keypad, but the TEST key gives you ten more. Tricky. That's thirteen if you don't count ISG and DSE.

My 16C appears to have ten. x<=y, x<0, x>y, x>0, x#y, x#0, x=y and x=0. That's eight, then there's F? and B?, the last unique to the 16C. But if you count ISG and DSE, that's twelve.

My 11C looks like it has nine, not counting the loop tests. All nine are the same as the 16C's, just leaving out B?.

I wouldn't know about the 10C, darn it!

My 12C is still in the mail.

Edited: 29 Aug 2005, 11:02 p.m.


#5

Hi, Howard;

I was leaving the University when I saw the quiz, so I just follow my memory. Yeap, no calculator in hands, no HoHPC site checking; I`m a teacher, cannot give a bad example, so, no cheating... I edited my first answer just because I forgot that the HP12C has [LN] and [e^x].

I took 'Conditional Tests' as described in the HP manuals. [F?] is named a 'flag test', and manuals do not exactly count it as conditional test, although I agree with you that it conditionally allows execution of (if flag set) or skips (if flag cleared) the instruction in the program step that follows it.

ISG and DSE (ISZ and DSZ in the HP16C) are mainly used as loop control instructions, and I also agree with you that there is a conditional test embeeded on both of them (four of them, if we count ISZ and DSZ inthe HP16C). Each of these instructions may be used as conditional tests, but as they perform three operations (change the register contents, tests the register contents in a very particular way, and perform or skips next program step), I think that they go beyond the single conditional test, probably the reason they are considered separately.

[B?] is a bit test instruction, and 'conditionally' skips or executes the next step if the flag (x-register) is set or cleared (in the binary number in y-register), respectively.

As the quiz was so precise mentioning the 12 conditional tests (found in the HP15C), the ten conditional test (also found in the HP11C and HP16C), I did not think twice. I agree with you, your answers are more precise when we consider the very instructions structure, and I must confess that if the figures were the ones you mention, I'd probably miss the answers.

Actually, I think I missed (I surely missed) the question about "no loop-counting", because I do not remember seeing such DSE or ISG in the HP10C. I do not even recall seeing the I register on it, neither the (i) indexer. In fact, thanks to a good soul (Hi, E.V.), I was able to complete my Voyager set some months ago with the addition of an HP10C to the other ones. I naver had an HP10C and actually could touch one and test it in the mid 80's.

Maybe I'm just justifying my answers and trying to earn my prize... <8^)

Thanks and best regards.

Luiz (yet with no calcs at hand, just counting on memory)

Edited: 30 Aug 2005, 12:09 a.m.


#6

You did a lot better than I did, even without a calculator to manipulate. I knew I had no chance from memory, since I've only had the machines a short time. But my legalistic mind was at work again. He said "no checking the pictures on the museum site" and honest your honor, I didn't look at any pictures. 8)

Actually, I was enjoying the survey of quirky Voyager calculator features and matching your answers against what I saw in front of me. I agree about ISG and DSE being enough different to be classed seperately from the other conditionals. (I did not know that the 16C's loop tests were different. Interesting.) And I think you could argue that F? should be seperate since it is testing a quantity outside the X and Y registers. (And HP makes that distinction, as you noted.) But in order to exclude B? from the list of conditional statements, you would have to extend the definition of those statements. In the 15C manual, a ".. conditional test compares a number in the X-register either to zero or to the number in the Y register." (Italics in original.) I think you'd have to add "entire" like this: "the entire number in the Y register" in order to exclude B?. In the 16C manual, bit tests and the other conditional tests are in sperate sections, but the index has:

Conditional tests,88-89
for bits,50-51


I therfore submit, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, that the prosecution has not proven beyond a reasonable doubt that my client, the B? test, is not, or should not be considered, a member of the elite group of Voyager calculator conditional tests. Your honor, the defense rests.

8)


#7

Hey!

Quote:
I therfore submit, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, that the prosecution has not proven beyond a reasonable doubt that my client, the B? test, is not, or should not be considered, a member of the elite group of Voyager calculator conditional tests. Your honor, the defense rests.
Does it mean I may not earn my prize? <*^C (BHWAA!)

(What else to say? I see no way out... Although it tests a single bit, [B?] indeed compares... Aha! It does not compare the contents of x- against y-register! It solely compares the state of bit #n (n is defined by x-register contents) that is actually located in word stored in y-register! Where is the jury? Oh, yeah; there!

So, ladies and gentlemen, members of the jury, distinctive attorney, your honor; I want to show exhibit #1 where we can clearly see [B?] comparing nothing but uniquely testing the status of a bit, where x-register contents was acting only a blind pointer, not a co-author. As my distinctive colleague mentioned in his clever defense:

Quote:
a ".. conditional test compares a number in the X-register either to zero or to the number in the Y register."
This characterizes a second flaw: the main number being tested is in y-register, not in x-register. So, as [B?] by itself cannot compare the contents of x- against y-register, [B?] is guilty as charged!

The state definitely rests.

(I don't know about the others, but I’ve been having as much fun going ahead with this discussion than I had answering the quiz... Hey, Howard, this is what I call a significant brainstorm! Cheers!)


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