HP-33s



#2

Just got my HP-33s from HP - I bought direct from the www site.
$49.95 + shipping

BTW - the decimal point is sure small


#3

Does it look any better if you change the radix type to a comma?


#4

If you look at the display in a right angle, the problem doesn't seem so serious. But if you move the calculator display about 40cm(~15 inches) away from you(thats where I usually would have it), you'll get - depending on the light sources around the calc - an unwanted shadow right below the display on the reflecting surface, which disturbs the clear view of the the LCD-segments. Changing the radix type isn't usefull from my sight - the shadow of the decimal point makes the radix look very similar to it. Usually, I'm not having viewing problems if I keep the display (not the calc) in a viewing angle of max. 20 degrees.

Robin

1234567890


#5

Robin,
I've found that if you adjust the contrast on the display, it helps a lot. It seems the default contrast (on mine at least) is full in the "+" direction. Hold the "ON" key while pressing the "+" or "-" keys several times to adjust the contrast. BTW in response to an earlier post, the comma seems as difficult to see (and distinguish between) as the decimal point.


#6

I've tried that, and the result was maybe slightly better, but still not satisfying at all. So i often have to lift it to read the numbers - and especially the proper position of the decimal point, so I dont mistake it with the commas. As I already mentioned, it depends strongly on where the light source comes from. When I'm working in front of a window, it's the worth case, if the ligth comes from behind or straight over you-it's usuable.

I like the keys, get used to the enter is no problem if you just ar willing to it. But it happens on fast typing that some keys aren't responding - even very seldomly - it makes blind typing to risky. It seems to be a software debouncing issue, because it happens only wenn you press the keys quite fast, even if they are pressed down to the stop. My about 14 Years old 42s doesn't have this behave at all! But maybe the most of you don't have this problem, it's hard to reproduce and maybe only mine has this behave (but I don't think so)
BTW: My 33s has the serial number CNA41109232.

I couldn't resist to open the 33s, and as i saw the soldering of the battery cables, it made me feel quite dissapointed.They would for sure not have kept connected for years, what a "timebomb"! I resoldered all off them, it made me feel safer even if I just use it for spare in exams (I need a working spare calc, not a dead one).

HP have made progress in the RPN-Sector, but not enough to catch up the retrogression they've made thru the past years. Electronic devices have decreased extremly in costs, what has increased for shure are the engineering/developing cost. But this usually are compensated with extremly cheap high-volume production nowadays, so no excuse for HP. For many company's, profit seems more important than image. Sometimes it's usefull to have a non-profit (or not so high)product to keep a good image(and that's the cheapest, best advertising you can get) and make more money with other products, but many managers fail to think so far, after my opinion.

So HP may never reach the level of they're older calcs again (quality, durability, efficiency). Maybe OpenRPN does somehow, as a non-profit organisation?

Regards,
Robin

1234


#7

Quote:
--------------
Sometimes it's usefull to have a non-profit (or not so high)product to keep a good image(and that's the cheapest, best advertising you can get) and make more money with other products, but many managers fail to think so far, after my opinion.
--------------
:Endquote

Ten or twenty years ago, the 'old' HP was one of these companies, where the entry product was an HP calculator, and since customers were satisfied in most cases, they tended to buy the more expensive stuff, like HP9000 workstations. Especially the HP9000 series 300, which were made like tanks, and flexible like an HP-41, and there are companies and institutes where these machines are still used.

These machines were *really* good, but in many cases they were bought because of the good reputation of the company.

What would you see as a good 'hp' entry level product today, which makes more appetite for the adanced stuff ?

At least the current calculators and printers are no good examples to push their reputation. Maybe they're not bad, but nothing special compared to other companies products (except maybe the 49g+ and the HP-48GX, where the 48GX was the perfect quality high-end calc, and the 49g+ finally is what the 49g always wanted to be but never was: a product. And in many respects the 49g+ is the only successor of the HP-48 (all IMHO;-))

Raymond

#8

Amazon seems to be the cheapest place to buy the HP33s because the purchase qualifies for free shipping!


#9

I finally decided to order a 33s for myself, tiny decimal point and all! www.officemart.com has them for $49.41. Order a pen or something else cheap to get the tally over $50.00, and shipping is free. They were out of stock a few weeks ago, but I successfully called in an order by phone yesterday.


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