calculatrice hp prime : deception



#26

une bonne partie de l'interface est mal pensée, HP a voulu tout tenter de se
demarquer de ce que font les autres ou de ce qui se faisait avant mais la
ils ont severement raté le coche.
je suis vraiment deçu car etant un gran fan de HP depuis 20 ans je m'attendais a mieux.

-comment voir l'etat de la memoire disponible ?
-qu'est ec que c'est que ce systeme de variables eclaté un peut partout ?
-a quoi rime ces types de données ?.

se mettre du coté de l'utilisateur serait binvenue.

auparavant nous avions un port serie avec les fonctions adequats, ceci est vraiment pratique dans un labo, il y avait aussi un port infrarouge.
Aujourd'hui :
-plus de port serie
-plus de port IR
-un port usb apparait mais il est inutilisable
-aucune fonction de communication prevue.
-le cable de liaison HP-HP bien que prevu n'est pas livré dans la boite

il y a d'autres bevues,
les convertions de base ne fonctionnent pas en RPN, il me semble d'ailleur que le RPN a été bricolé.
Impossible de regler le temps d'extinction ou de baisse de la luminosité.
pas d'affichage de la date.
pas de buzzer ni de fonction alarmes.

quel domage, le hard de la mchine etait pour la premiere fois capable de faire tourner l'os a vitesse acceptable,
l'ecran couleur avec un definition suffisante.
batterie integrée, c'etait bien partie mais les SOFTEUX on raté leur coup, j'espere sincerement que des
corrections vont etre apportées rapidement car nous avons la l'image d'un produit honteux


#27

"il me semble d'ailleur que le RPN a été bricolé"

Oui, je ne suis pas extatique sur la RPN ainsi. Il semble que ce n'était pas dans l'avant-garde de la conception.

Yes, I'm not ecstatic about the RPN as well. It seems as though it wasn't in the forefront of the design.

Note: I'm using Google translate.
http://translate.google.com/


#28

Si. Desafortunadamente, no solamente no funciona bien con RPN, pero también causa problemas serias si se usa RPN con ciertas aplicaciones que no funcionan correctamente. Yo tuve corrupción del flash drive, resultando en pérdida de mis programas y data. Ahora, yo solamente uso el sistema algebraico en mi Prime.


#29

But without RPN, it's not an HP! That's the whole reason I haven't jumped ship to a different brand is RPN ...

Pero sin el modo RPN, que no se trata de un HP! Esa es toda la razón no he saltado del barco a una marca diferente es el modo RPN...


#30

RPN es una ilusión en el Prime.


#31

@kris223: I recommend you get a WP 34S (and its manual) to see what RPN can do.

d:-)

#32

I'm sorry if you felt the Prime was a 50g replacement. It is not nor was it marketed as such (by HP at least, individual vendors may have done so against our recommendations). It will most likely get there eventually once some of the rough interactions between CAS/numerical land are resolved for the majority of 50g users, but in no way was it supposed to replace the 50g in all uses or for all users. The average 50g user is, lets be honest, far outside the norm when it comes to the large mainstream market in nearly every way. I am proud to be part of that tiny market segment, as I suspect the majority of us are as well. :-)

When the calculator is used by a "normal" user, of which none of us on this forum counts as, it was very thoroughly tested has been very well received overall. Additionally, it is getting a lot of people excited about HP calculators that never before were. Which HP calculator has been discussed on both TI and Casio forums to the extent of Prime? Which has program sections in those said locations? Exactly.

Are there parts of the system that are not "complete" in that we had additional things planned that would not fit in the schedule? Of course.

I find it rather telling to look at the majority of reviews comparing the "top of the line" calulators from the big 3. It seems to me the reviewers that are *not long term HP users* have slotted Prime between the classpad, and nudging up against the nspire in several ways (and passed in others). Both of those products have *years* of being on the market, several versions of both hardware and software, and yet with the first release it is being said by most that the classpad is already passed and the nspire better watch out!

As HP users of the 50g, we have been used to complete, utter customization and control of everything. We have been used to being able to, with a few key presses, be browsing the ROM code! We look at prime and say "well that has useless programming. I can't do anything with it" - because we are used to having everything from before.

Yet the guys that have been fighting for the ability to program ANYTHING on the nspire seem to be quite amazed and happy with the programming capabilities Prime brings because it already seems to them much better then what TI offers. It really is a matter of perspective and expectations.

Your expectations were extremely high and, to be honest, I don' know if any company, ever, could hit the high expectations we as a a collective group of "hp calculator nuts" have created. I've seen a huge number of people that are extreemly excited about the calculator that I did not think would be... so at least there must be some good in it. :-)

To hit a few of your points. Memory available? With 256MB of memory in there, there is so much that at this early stage there is basically no way to fill it. Would you prefer we spent time on a memory display, or more time on something like allowing the user to create variables directly rather then limiting it to program definition only? Everything has a price in time and tradeoffs always have to be made.

RPN is not the foundation and bedrock of the system. True, there were a few annoying bugs that were missed. :-( HP is still committed to RPN, but has not been exclusively committed to it for a very long time. The tradeoff in this case was "Do we put in RPN even though we can't fully use it everywhere yet (CAS)? Or do we wait until it can be fully supported everywhere and tick everyone off who likes RPN in the meantime?" I remember with the 39gII that simply the fact that there was no RPN option made it so a large chunk of people here said they'd never even bother to look at it. (ignoring the availability issue of course which was a totally different issue) With Prime, I think a large majority of people who decided to get one have ended up pleasantly surprised and overall pleased!

Alarms and buzzer. While these are nice for a very small set of people, the rest of the world has a phone in the pocket. Should we spend time on that, or getting RPN into the CAS? I do see the benefit for being able to time things in a lab environment, but I just have a hard time justifying that as higher priority then so many other things still needing work.

Time and date. I'm not certain regarding the classpad, but I do know that the nspire has no clock like prime does. Also, tap on that corner and you get a full date display and quick angle toggle. So yes, it is there.

I'm glad that you are so passionate about HP calculators and truly do wish we could have spent additional years polishing Prime before it came out so everything would be "perfect" simply from a personal pride perspective. However, I am not sad that the product has been released because I thought, and still think, it was the time to do so. I feel it is a great unit that a lot of customers will enjoy. If you don't at this exact moment, the hopefully with future updates and enhancements you will feel so also.

TW

--

Although I work for the HP calculator group, the feelings and thoughts I express here are my own.


Edited: 20 Oct 2013, 11:35 a.m.


#33

Hello Tim,
firstly, thank you for your answer, one thing must be important to note is that i'm a fan if i could write it of hp calculators since a very long time.

in my previous comment my goal is to compare my MARVELOUS HP48 to the new PRIME tha i have waited since a very long time.

i'm working in a R&D (electronic's) for a big company on the elevator's, during years my HP48 was on work each day, i like to do to my colleague that this HP48 is for me like a second brain !!!

so note that if i write some critic about the product it's because i was disapointed with the newlly arrived machine, WHY ??
because the hp-prime in my mind will do at least what the HP48 do, and it's not the case.

in my lab i have several time 'debug' some software with my hp-48, with a little electronic's i put the machine on a real MODBUS network (this is an example) i'm desapointed because the prime can't do it, not about the OLD serial port but about the USB, the prime does no give acces to it's communication line, so impossible for me to connect accesories:
(on the hp48 we have for example XMIT and SRECV command).

about the memory yes, i'm agree with you the quantity is enormous but on the hp48 i can write the MEM command to know where i am with it.

about the programming :
the hp48 collect all OBJECTS in the var menu, the hp-prime do the same but on different room, using var is not easy and not so logical.
I have written on my hp48 all the electronic's formulla i use and put them in memory to recall them and solve or ISOL them when necessary, to do the same with the prime !!! i don't know how to do it, i admit, i have only see that only 9 equations are possible (probably a mistake from me, but this case show how it's not so logical).

about the RPN,
so impossible for me to use CLASSICAL entry and this is the reason why i have never buy an hp-39gII, i can give you example of RPN wrong fonctionnality.

about the stack :
all in the hp48 is do in stack !!
when i cahnge the numerical base from hexadecimal to binary !! the hp48 scan all objects and convert, the prime no.
an arrow let me SWAP in the 48, the prime not.

my goal is to put your mind to understand that, some hp user would like to continue with hp rules, and some habit but you change too much thing's.

good things i like :
yes i'm not a figter for the prime and there is very good things
color screen
memory
speed (hp48 is very slow)
slim case
battery
nice mathematic apps
drawing

i can add some other things
we can't choose the off time and the time when the backlight is changed to less.

the buzzer, the electronic's of the prime is made to add it, the component is not soldered, it can be added.

now the software to connect the machine to a computer ???????
WHAT HAVE YOU TRY TO DO ???
what's wrong with the engeneer who write the code ???
the software is a joke ??

to finish, i would like to love the hp-prime but i can't, the HP feeling i have is not here with this machine, and you can remdy it
i wish some 'director's' will understand my message and modify the firmware, if i think this, i'm perhaps not the only one.


#34

Quote:
and arrow let me SWAP in the 48, the prime not.

You can still SWAP the contents of the first two levels of the stack on the Prime with the comma(,) key.

Edited: 20 Oct 2013, 12:34 p.m.

#35

Fabrice,
now you can understand how I felt when all they were capable to give me as a follow-up for my 41 was a 48...

Just jokin' (but not so much ;-))

Massimo

#36

As long as HP is committed to RPN, and they will improve it with updates, I'm OK with that. What other choice do I have? I've used HP RPN calculators since the late 80's I guess, and I will over stock on old used calcs before I switch no matter how nice the color screens are. I have to say that "hp calculator nuts" are the bedrock of the line though. HP can try to bust into the TI market but it's going to take a lot of PR work as many text books these days are geared around their calculators. A lot of instructors explicitly tell the class to go get a TI and their examples are done on a TI, and that's what the bookstore has. I haven't seen anything other than a few HP business calcs in a college bookstore for maybe ten years? I sit in class with my RPN and smirk at the sheep as I finish well off and with ease because the calculator is superior. If one alienates the RPN crowd, like they did many years back by discontinuing it altogether, HP may find themselves between a rock and a hard place and me long with it. I'm counting on you guys!

For some reason I noticed there was a shift in the late 90's early 2k's I guess. Before then most of my instructors used HP calcs. Most of the engineers and physicists I work with today still use HP RPN calcs. But the new kids use TI's. One thing is that there are a ton of RPN calc's being used at this very moment because they don't break. It may be less apparent that we freaks are out there due to this. I bought an HP33s just because I thought I'd voice that people do want to buy them and I was thinking this could be it for RPN as HP had just cancelled it before this calc. I never used it though as I preferred my 32sII ...

I've never bought any graphing calc after the 48G as that one has served me so well that I never thought about buying another one till the Prime came out. The updates for the Prime will determine my future purchases of newer HP calcs as I'm trying to feel out HP's philosophy on the topic. I know what the old philosophy was, but I'm not so experienced on the new. Before purchasing the Prime I read about how "RPN will be a mode setting, and still very much a first-class citizen" (Springer) and I have a feeling that this will be true in the end. So far I like the Prime more than dislike it and I do not regret my purchase.

HP has a tricky line to play and it's not easy pleasing everyone. I really like their calculators though and I have hopes for the best.

For the record I'm very pleased that the Prime has no sound. I don't like sound.


Edited: 20 Oct 2013, 3:52 p.m.


#37

I feel the need to respond to all these sensible things people say in this thread (it sharpens my French and Spanish language skills as well).

I am very impressed with the Prime and especially the ambition HP has with the programming facilities. Of course it would have been nice to have something like RPL on the calculator, because it has always served me well.

I do agree with many of the posters that RPN should be working fine or at least shouldn't cause problems and crashes. I understand that many of the Prime's features have been geared towards students and scholars, but the prime offers a feature set that has been my wish for a calculator for a long time. When the nSpire CX was launched I have been seriously thinking about buying one.
However, not having RPN is a dealbreaker for me. Somehow HP managed to find an entry logic that sticks to you and permanently deforms you. I have never been able to work on a algebraic calculator since.

I seriously hope that there will be two ROM's for the Prime ;-) One for students and scholars who need to comply (with examination mode) and one for engineers with a handful of useful extras. I accidenally enabled examination mode and haven't been able to work with my calc until I installed the connectivity kit. Also the trig, quadratic and linear explorers could be shifted from the engineering release. Instead it would be great to enable some of the USB features such as the possibility to connect an FT232 chip for serial comms or connect HID devices.

All in all, I really really hope that the prime will evolve in the superb calculator it is destined to be. I will get used to the PPL and like the fact that it's object oriented (or at least for a part of it) and I can live with some functionalities only available with CAS entry. But the current instabilities are slightly worrisome for this engineer.

But I love the fact that HP is back in the game. Please note that in the Netherlands some of the math textbooks are written with TI calculators in mind (and explain how to use them). Somehow I would love to see a big change...

Kind regards, Eelco

#38

Quote:
For some reason I noticed there was a shift in the late 90's early 2k's I guess.

There are probably several reasons for that:

  1. The fundamental nature of HP changed. In the 70's, it was a test and measurement company - and once an engineer or scientist has made a measurement, what will they want to do next? Correct - calculate with it. So calculators were a very nice complementary line extension which enhanced the HP brand. These days, I'm not sure what HP is: if I was feeling particularly sardonic, I would say a toner and ink cartridge company, but it's not really that bad.
  2. While HP owned the science & engineering market, TI successfully targeted the much larger, but price-sensitive education market - with the additional benefit that those students would keep using the machines they'd grown up with rather than switching to HP. HP was forced to compete in that segment, and it has completely distracted from the original market of technical professionals.

As you say, HP has a tricky line to steer. One hand, the education market lends itself to prepackaged applications running on a relatively high-powered device. Once you've got the power, the rich interface, etc. of course, you'd want to exploit it with prepackaged lessons, etc. On the other, all that stuff just gets in the way of someone like me who just wants to grab a small device and do a back-of-an-envelope calculation. The most common task for my calculators in recent years has been doing a quick mean/sdev across small sets of experimental results, and occasional exploratory calculations around the behaviour of small Markov Decision Processes. In the latter case, I'm working with paper and pencil, trying to figure something out; I'm concerned with the problem domain and the last thing I need is for the device to pose another layer of problem to be overcome. ;)

Best,

--- Les

[http://www.lesbell.com.au]

#39

Quote:
Are there parts of the system that are not "complete" in that we had additional things planned that would not fit in the schedule? Of course.

As Bill Wickes of Corvallis Division famously observed on March 28, 1990, "Life is short and ROM is full. " Thanks to Moore's Law we can now afford more flash for code storage, so ROM probably isn't full, but life is still short.

It's quite amazing what IS in the HP Prime, given the size of the development team and the short time available in the schedule.


#40

Hear, hear Eric! Well said!

#41

Quote:
I'm sorry if you felt the Prime was a 50g replacement. It is not nor was it marketed as such...

Let me chime in here with a unique perspective. I'm one of those "hp calculator nuts" who loved RPN/RPL on my 41cx/28c/49g+/50g. But I'm also a high school math teacher and as such am surrounded by Algebraic calculators. I am fluent with the TI's, but my "mother tongue" is HP. I find my 50g to be invaluable. If something happened to it, I'd order a replacement the same day.

That said, I have had only a handful of students that I have recommended getting a 50g. For those that are willing to climb the learning curve, it's an exceedingly valuable tool. The Prime is the first HP calculator that I feel I can recommend to all my students. (Well, that is, I'll recommend it to all just as soon as it gets put on the College Board's list of calculators allowed on the AP Calculus and Physics exams.)

-wes


#42

I'm also an enthusiast user of HP calculator (I paid my first HP25 working all a summer...) and I have also some students. But, I wouldn't recommend to any of them a calculator who is prone to crash, has a lot of modes not fully compatible between themselves and is not idiot proof. I don't want any of my students having a crash during an examination or being in doubt with a result.
After having compared TI, Casio and HP, I consider that from a school standpoint the winners are Casio, and TI. HP has a lot of good stuff but, at the moment, neither the 39GII nor the Prime seem to be fully debugged and idiot proof.
That wouldn't preclude me to use a HP32 and a HP15C for my engineering activities ;-)

BTW, from a cost/efficiency standpoint any cheap tablet with android and some mathematical software can offer much more for a student than any calculator on the market. This is another story.

My 2 cents


#43

Quote:
I'm also an enthusiast user of HP calculator (I paid my first HP25 working all a summer...) and I have also some students. But, I wouldn't recommend to any of them a calculator who is prone to crash, has a lot of modes not fully compatible between themselves and is not idiot proof. I don't want any of my students having a crash during an examination or being in doubt with a result.
After having compared TI, Casio and HP, I consider that from a school standpoint the winners are Casio, and TI. HP has a lot of good stuff but, at the moment, neither the 39GII nor the Prime seem to be fully debugged and idiot proof.
That wouldn't preclude me to use a HP32 and a HP15C for my engineering activities ;-)

BTW, from a cost/efficiency standpoint any cheap tablet with android and some mathematical software can offer much more for a student than any calculator on the market. This is another story.


My 2 cents


The Problem with this is, at least at my university, in Engineering Math,Physics,Chemistry and Geology,and certain other classes, Cell Phones,Tablets,etc. are not allowed in most Labs and exams. for the same reason certain calculators are not allowed for National Engineering & Surveying exams,etc. Cheating!
We, as in the University ,have caught students trying to use cell phones to text exam questions to other students in other sections.
Also caught students getting data from experiments and writing lab reports without even coming to the lab sessions.


#44

I was not suggesting for students to use tablets in exams, I was just pointing to those devices for homework or from a mobile standpoint. I was thinking to CAS, geometry and programming.

#45

Quote:
But, I wouldn't recommend to any of them a calculator who is prone to crash, has a lot of modes not fully compatible between themselves and is not idiot proof. I don't want any of my students having a crash during an examination or being in doubt with a result.
After having compared TI, Casio and HP, I consider that from a school standpoint the winners are Casio, and TI.

You should have seen the AP Calculus forum after last year's Calc exam. On one particular problem, there was widespread lockups on the TI-89 and TI-Nspire CAS calculators. It was a CAS issue trying to solve an equation that included an absolute value. There were some pretty upset students taking that test. I'm very surprised TI hasn't issued an OS update since that happened.

This summer I picked up a new TI-84+ Color SE for the math dept teachers to familiarize themselves with. On the first day playing with it, I managed to somehow lock it up tight. I don't remember what I did, but I wasn't trying to intentionally mess it up. Good thing they added a reset button since the internal battery can't be (easily) pulled like on the regular 84+.

I can't really comment about Casio calculators. I've never really gotten the hang of them when it came to more complex tasks. Always seemed awkward to use, no doubt due in part to my unfamiliarity with them.

-wes


#46

Its not like I'm super smart, far from it, and being older won't help with that, but they didn't allow calculators, of any type, on any of my Calculus exams. As I recall most of my math classes at that level didn't. I wonder why they do now? As I recall, the best we ever got was a little cheat sheet to write fundamentals on. Having anything near the equivalence of MatLab type stuff on a differential equations test would be considered cheating I would imagine and no calculators were allowed for my electronics classes dealing with Laplace transforms either ... sure would help with checking homework though. Would make life easy ... or harder to have a calc like these as they may gear the tests different these days. Sure is a different thought though. The last time I glanced at an AP Calculus book though it didn't seem much different than what we did calculator free. Maybe not though ... I'm going to try not being one of those "in my day we walked to school uphill both ways in the snow while it was raining and the wind was in our face because it had a job to do and we knew the value of work so we appreciated all the hard work the wind ..." kind of guys :)

Does the Prime do Laplace transforms? That would be cool. [EDIT] <- Answer is yes, it's in the manual. I will have to play around with this. The HP50G prob does these type of operations as well maybe? I went from the 48G to the Prime. I may pick up a 50G due to the lower cost and it seems very much like a 48G upgrade. Why not, I say, as one can never have too many calculators! Kind of like chess sets ...


Edited: 22 Oct 2013, 10:57 p.m.


#47

Quote:
Its not like I'm super smart, far from it, and being older won't help with that, but they didn't allow calculators, of any type, on any of my Calculus exams. As I recall most of my math classes at that level didn't. I wonder why they do now?

College exams vary widely from place to place: no calculator, any calculator, no CAS allowed, CAS required.

As far as the AP Calc exam, it's mixed. Most of the exam is without a calculator but part is with. On the non-calculator sections, students are expected work things out by hand without any help or notes or anything.

On the calculator sections, students are expected to use the calculator to determine some value as part of a problem in which the intent is to test the understanding of the concepts rather than the details of the process. A typical example would be to give a velocity function, v(t), and ask about things like: total distance traveled, average velocity, average speed, change in acceleration, average acceleration. They're testing to see if a student understands when to take a derivative or integral or whatever rather than the process of finding that derivative or integral.

Part of the test is to see if the student understands when to use and when not to use technology. It's not unusual for them to give a function that you cannot integrate by hand. However, not all the questions on the calculator section require a calculator.

Each part has different purposes. I think the test strikes a good balance and hits an average of what different colleges do.

-wes


#48

That makes sense. The tool is there so let's not dumb down the material but augment it. I can see how it would be very useful to quickly test larger concepts. Thanks ... still walking up hill both ways to school was medicinal! These kids and their confounded scooters, always smiling with those shiny helmets ;)

#49

Quote:
I'm sorry if you felt the Prime was a 50g replacement. It is not nor was it marketed as such (by HP at least, individual vendors may have done so against our recommendations). It will most likely get there eventually once some of the rough interactions between CAS/numerical land are resolved for the majority of 50g users, but in no way was it supposed to replace the 50g in all uses or for all users. The average 50g user is, lets be honest, far outside the norm when it comes to the large mainstream market in nearly every way. I am proud to be part of that tiny market segment, as I suspect the majority of us are as well. :-)

When the calculator is used by a "normal" user, of which none of us on this forum counts as, it was very thoroughly tested has been very well received overall. Additionally, it is getting a lot of people excited about HP calculators that never before were. Which HP calculator has been discussed on both TI and Casio forums to the extent of Prime? Which has program sections in those said locations? Exactly.

Are there parts of the system that are not "complete" in that we had additional things planned that would not fit in the schedule? Of course.

I find it rather telling to look at the majority of reviews comparing the "top of the line" calulators from the big 3. It seems to me the reviewers that are *not long term HP users* have slotted Prime between the classpad, and nudging up against the nspire in several ways (and passed in others). Both of those products have *years* of being on the market, several versions of both hardware and software, and yet with the first release it is being said by most that the classpad is already passed and the nspire better watch out!

As HP users of the 50g, we have been used to complete, utter customization and control of everything. We have been used to being able to, with a few key presses, be browsing the ROM code! We look at prime and say "well that has useless programming. I can't do anything with it" - because we are used to having everything from before.

Yet the guys that have been fighting for the ability to program ANYTHING on the nspire seem to be quite amazed and happy with the programming capabilities Prime brings because it already seems to them much better then what TI offers. It really is a matter of perspective and expectations.

Your expectations were extremely high and, to be honest, I don' know if any company, ever, could hit the high expectations we as a a collective group of "hp calculator nuts" have created. I've seen a huge number of people that are extreemly excited about the calculator that I did not think would be... so at least there must be some good in it. :-)

To hit a few of your points. Memory available? With 256MB of memory in there, there is so much that at this early stage there is basically no way to fill it. Would you prefer we spent time on a memory display, or more time on something like allowing the user to create variables directly rather then limiting it to program definition only? Everything has a price in time and tradeoffs always have to be made.

RPN is not the foundation and bedrock of the system. True, there were a few annoying bugs that were missed. :-( HP is still committed to RPN, but has not been exclusively committed to it for a very long time. The tradeoff in this case was "Do we put in RPN even though we can't fully use it everywhere yet (CAS)? Or do we wait until it can be fully supported everywhere and tick everyone off who likes RPN in the meantime?" I remember with the 39gII that simply the fact that there was no RPN option made it so a large chunk of people here said they'd never even bother to look at it. (ignoring the availability issue of course which was a totally different issue) With Prime, I think a large majority of people who decided to get one have ended up pleasantly surprised and overall pleased!

Alarms and buzzer. While these are nice for a very small set of people, the rest of the world has a phone in the pocket. Should we spend time on that, or getting RPN into the CAS? I do see the benefit for being able to time things in a lab environment, but I just have a hard time justifying that as higher priority then so many other things still needing work.

Time and date. I'm not certain regarding the classpad, but I do know that the nspire has no clock like prime does. Also, tap on that corner and you get a full date display and quick angle toggle. So yes, it is there.

I'm glad that you are so passionate about HP calculators and truly do wish we could have spent additional years polishing Prime before it came out so everything would be "perfect" simply from a personal pride perspective. However, I am not sad that the product has been released because I thought, and still think, it was the time to do so. I feel it is a great unit that a lot of customers will enjoy. If you don't at this exact moment, the hopefully with future updates and enhancements you will feel so also.

TW

--

Although I work for the HP calculator group, the feelings and thoughts I express here are my own.


Tim:

I don't believe the Casio Classpad has a clock and timer, at least the 330 doesn't. I don't know if the new 400 does since I don't own one.

The nSpire's programming language outright was bad at the beginning. Now it is passable, though I wish the language included ways to update other pages automatically. The Prime programming language, in my humble opinion, beats the nSpire's language by far and can compete (and probably is better than) with the Classpad's language.

Eddie

Edited: 22 Oct 2013, 11:58 p.m.


#50

The BASIC of the Nspire remains unable to draw pixels to the screen or read individual keypresses from the keyboard, and as such, remains outright bad. There's Lua, but it isn't officially programmable on-calc, people use oclua and nowadays Jens_K's good Lua script editor.

The Classpad's BASIC is known to be horribly slow. It was recently witnessed to take more than 6 minutes for going through a simple high-school level exercise that the TI-Z80, TI-68k, Nspire, Prizm (fx-CG10/fx-GC20) and of course Prime finish in a matter of 1-3 seconds. On the fx-CP400, using floating-point computations / approx mode instead of integer computations reduced the running time to ~50s, which is still unacceptable.



BTW, despite the fancy letters, the official writing for "Nspire" is "Nspire" (most people, starting by myself, did the mistake at the beginning) :)


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