How would you respond?



#29

So, I finally have the HP-67 a co-worker gave me working perfectly. Thanks for all the advice; it turned out to be the switch alignment and a bad card, not the caps that I swapped out. So, my wife thinks I'm crazy. I've had an HP12C for over a decade and she hates it and refuses to use it (even gets mad if it's the only calculator she can find). She says it's old! I've always loved the way RPN worked on the 12C and the 67 sparked my interest again. I'm back in school and was using my 10 year old TI-83SE, but was looking for a replacement. I bought a 50g and a 35s and love them. I read the entire 380 page 35s manual and I'm working on the 50g manual. My wife doesn't understand why I'm obsessed lately with these calculators. I tried to show her tic-tac-toe on the 67 and she said it was the geekiest thing she has ever seen and refused to watch the complete demo. She wanted to know why I would have a calculator over my computer, Android, or iPhone. What is a good response for why someone would use a calculator these days and not a computer (other than for taking tests)? For me, I'm a programmer and my first computer was a Sinclair ZX81 (I still have it and it works) and it introduced me to Z80 assembler. I like working with registers and manipulating memory, it take me back. I'm curious, because it seems like most people here enjoy using calculators, how would you respond?


#30

Answer with another question: Why bothering with an inferior replacement.

* nigh on no time to boot
* long battery life
* little power consumption
* dedicated keyboard for safe entries
Not as much use for calculators as some decades ago, but still they haven't been made obsolete by now.
#31

Quote:
She says it's old!
You could suggest getting rid of your old silverware and other things that are just as useful today as when they were brand new.

Quote:
She wanted to know why I would have a calculator over my computer, Android, or iPhone. What is a good response for why someone would use a calculator these days and not a computer (other than for taking tests)?
Multiple reasons. To me a big one is that the iPhone (etc.) only last a couple of years. The investment in learning to make good use of a worthy tool is such that you'll want to use it for decades. I've had certain programs I use a lot in my 41 continuously for nearly 25 years. (Try that with any consumer-electronics item! Another is that it's instant-on and you don't have to go through menus to get to the calculator. One I've used on the 41 and 71 that doesn't exist on the others is the ability, through HPIL, to take data from instruments on the workbench and control processes, something the iPhone can't do (although I mostly use my home-made workbench computer for that now).

#32

Being back in school takes all of my time and I've had to put all of my hobbies on hold, but I've been thinking about this calculator and the serial port. I have a radioshack probescope, multimeter, and eTrek GPS that are all serial. I've been thinking about what I could do with them hooked up to my calculator. The RS Probescope is practically useless on my bench, because I use my bench oscope which is much faster. But, I wonder if I could get more use out of it hooked up to my calculator. At work, I write inspection applications for collecting data to run simulations on buildings, rail, pavements, pipes, etc. A huge issue is the labor to do data collection. I'm always trying to find devices that can collect data. The 50g may or may not be suited to do data collection for field work, but I noticed that surveyors use it, I'm assuming, for that purpose. It probably wouldn't be hard to hook up a Parallax RFID Reader to it or even make it wireless with a Parallax Transciever to transmit and receive data. What would be nice would be to fabricate a sled that replaces the battery cover and allows devices to be plugged into the serial port and held in place where the battery cover attaches.


#33

One nice thing about HPIL on the 41 and 71 was that it let you connect to dozens of devices simultaneously. I used to use the HP82169A HPIL-to-HPIB (or IEEE-488) interface converter regularly. Since HPIL and IEEE-488 were so similar, the converter was basically transparent, making IEEE-488 equipment appear to be on HPIL. There is a gizmo available to adapt the 50g to RS-232. It would take some more ingenuity and programming to adapt it to multiple things at once, but it could be done. See http://imgur.com/a/qR35j and http://www.allenwan.com/hpcalcserialcable/ . If there's a way to interface it to IEEE-488 (HPIB), that would give you immediate access to hundreds, maybe even thousands of models of lab instruments. The IEEE-488 fanout capacity allowed 15 devices on the bus at once. (HPIL allowed a lot more.) Again, reasons to use the calc there instead of a laptop is the longevity, the smaller amount of space it takes on a crowded workbench, and ease of disconnecting it to take from the workbench to the office and back, which have been valuable to me.

#34

This is a fairly typical attitude of people these days. People are unwilling to expend time and learn how to do something when a canned answer is available elsewhere with no investment on their part apart from throwing some money at it or sticking it in google or doing it with minimal learning even if the approach is retarded. Anything contrary to that had been programmed into their mind as obsolete and idiotic.

A case in point, one of my coworkers gets 10 people to fill in a spreadsheet rather than extract the data from our project management software via a report. He doesn't know how to do it and doesn't want to expend any effort past a google search. This wastes ten lives for two hours a week.

In my particular case, i find a calculator considerably more useful and usable than an iPhone/Android/PC device. The android and iPhone type devices are designed for consumption i.e. pushing information to the user and upselling the vendor's sales platform. The calculator is designed for serving the user and solving problems quickly.

People who invest the time to understand are invaluable. Everyone else is fungible. Its good to be totally non fungible which is why I've managed to fight off one engineering crash and two "dot com" crashes.

There is a good discussion of this whole problem in Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance by Robert Persig under the guise of quality, romanticism in the form of Chautauquas.

Philosophy aside, my 50g just works and yes it is fun to be able to solve a problem before people have even booted windows and fired up excel on their laptops or downloaded a calculator app for their iPhone.

I write software too, for financial services.


Edited: 21 Apr 2013, 3:33 a.m.


#35

Quote:
This is a fairly typical attitude of people these days. People are unwilling to expend time and learn how to do something when a canned answer is available elsewhere with no investment on their part apart from throwing some money at it or sticking it in google or doing it with minimal learning even if the approach is retarded. Anything contrary to that had been programmed into their mind as obsolete and idiotic.

I wonder if this is a direct adaptation to the rapid change? They know and expect everything to be obsolete--so why bother learning it?

Except learning the iphone. Then again, there is nothing to learn there...


#36

Interesting idea.

Personally I think that it's more that people are content with consuming rather than producing. People capitalised on that and offered epic amounts of consumption at a price that matches the earning power of service economies.

There will be a singularity when there aren't enough people left skilled enough to provide enough consumption for the consumers.

Then they'll have to do something more complicated than flipping burgers to pay for their cable TV subscription.

#37

Hello Richard,

maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that's not a rational problem, which can be solved by rational and clever arguments. For you it's a kind of nostalgia and familiarization.

Search for a respond to the question: Why your wife doesn't take it easy, that You are wasting time by using old fashioned and clumsy (in her eyes) machines?

This helps maybe more and shifts the precedence of this problem in a
field that could be labeled as: freedom in a marriage.

Sincerely
peacecalc

#38

Hello!

Quote:
I'm curious, because it seems like most people here enjoy using calculators, how would you respond?

Luckily I don't need to respond because my wife collects her own stuff (among other things Star Trek memorabilia....) and understands my motive perfectly well :-) Otherwise I would just say: I like these things and that's why I buy and keep them.

BTW: Many years ago, I bought my wife an HP21S Stat Math calculator (then new from the shop) that she has been using ever since, almost daily. Maybe you should try and give your wife an algebraic model too, that she actually likes to use?

Happy calculating!
max


#39

Quote:
(among other things Star Trek memorabilia....)

So a Trekulator is common ground for you two.

I love this machine!

Edited: 21 Apr 2013, 12:39 p.m.


#40

Quote:
I love this machine!

Me too! And of course we have one (fully working, but without the box in the pictures) :-)

#41

Husbands who don't have to upgrade to the latest model should be desirable.


#42

Monte wins for shortest, funniest, best answer.


#43

I agree.


#44

A hobby is:

Do it with the greatest effort and get the lowest profit
(and my wife is agree with me {model planes})

Greetings from switzerland
Hans-Peter


#45

An old hobby of mine is RC planes and heli's. Learning to fly was filled with lots of effort and constant expense with no profit. That's good advice for hobbies :)

#46

if she's a country music fan, tell her "it's a family tradition".
that goes even if you're only starting the tradition.


#47

It's actually not that far off. My dad and her dad both were into electronics, computers, and calculators from the 60's on. My 3 year old (almost 4) is crazy about calculators and has a small collection himself. He lines them up, enters numbers on each one and does some math with them. He actually knows how to use RPN and knows the difference between enter and equals. If we ask him some simple math, he will do it on each. It's a game my wife actually started playing with him to learn numbers, since his fascination with calculators began at 1 when he started taking my calculators and not giving them back. His favorite calculators are the HP12C (that he also calls the old calculator) and a ti-30x that he carries everywhere.


#48

Enjoy!

d:-)

#49

Say you like calculators and you like mathematics. If she doesn't like it, tough beans for her. :)


#50

I don't have a dog house yet, but that's a good way to get one. I do have a couch and tv in my garage.


#51

She gets to collect what she wants, correct? Fair is fair.

Most of my family leaves me alone about it with zilch flack.

#52

Quote:
.... So, my wife thinks I'm crazy.... [she] doesn't understand why I'm obsessed lately with these calculators.

Welcome to the club!!!

#53

My response would be that I prefer devices that I can access and control in a manner that is flexible and efficient for the purpose I intend to use them for. As opposed to a device that interferes, is not transparent in it's operation and causes undesirable burdens when used for the purpose I intend to use it for.

#54

Matthew, don't worry!
Simply you'll say her that you like them, nothing to explain, nothing to understand, up to me.

#55

Are you a hoarder? Do you have boxes of old calculators stacked on every piece of furniture and on the stairway you've only left a narrow trail to walk on? If not, she should be lucky/happy. If you do, we can help you out by storing your calculators for you- Out of sight, out of mind- as they say. Your marriage CAN BE SAVED! Just ship those old calculators to us, your good friends on this forum and enjoy wedded bliss once again. We feel your pain and are willing to help out a fellow psycho^H^H^H^H collector by easing his burden.


#56

LOL :)

Nice try Ren but you know the biggest symptom of this "disease" we all share is the inability to let any of your prized calculators out of your possession.

Steve


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