New HP scientifc calculator



#26

Heollo,

I have found this all new scientific calculator by HP (evolution of the HP 10S) : the HP 10S+ already in stores in some countries of Europe :

http://www.calc-bank.com/index.php?mod=news&ac=commentaires&id=1724


#27

Hi.

Thanks for pointing that up.

Quote:
On retrouve a priori exactement les mêmes commandes mais le design a totalement changé et on a affaire à une très belle calculatrice.
At least it has a new, improved look, although keeping 'exactly the same commands'. A new branch from the existing breed.

Cheers.

Luiz (Brésil)

Edited: 28 Oct 2012, 7:25 a.m.


#28

It seems it's a strongly Casio like calculator, developed by Kinpo. (?)

See this manual.


Edit: Casio fx-85MS manual.


Edited: 28 Oct 2012, 2:04 p.m.


#29

This is a good looking Casio fx-85 clone. Hopefully the keyboard lasts this time.


#30

Quote:
This is a good looking Casio fx-85 clone. Hopefully the keyboard lasts this time.

There "was" a day at HP, that people in the company would have shuttered at the mere thought of the public wondering if the keyboard on a HP branded calculator would work or not.....Those were the days.

#31

Is this the best entry level calculator by HP under CEO Meg Whitman?

Get a stock OEM brand and put the HP logo! where's the "HP Invent!" ethos?


#32

It is being used elsewhere on the interesting projects. :-)

Price points like that unfortunately don't give much wiggle room to do anything "different" as that usually means the cost gets too high for any project to move forward.

TW

#33

YES!! Where's the unique look (and feel) of an HP calculator. Where's the trademark HP keyboard design and body shape. I'd expect a one-of-a-kind design from HP not a Casio with HP model number lettering.

Edited: 31 Oct 2012, 12:23 p.m.


#34

And you get that on the products for which HP actually has a non-trivial profit margin. You can't expect the same on a bargain-basement product. The overriding design consideration for that class of product is that every penny has to be pinched.


#35

Well, now that I know this 10s update was not a pure HP project (Kinpo, right), I can understand why its design departs from the HP look & feel.

#36

Quote:
And you get that on the products for which HP actually has a non-trivial profit margin. You can't expect the same on a bargain-basement product. The overriding design consideration for that class of product is that every penny has to be pinched.

Which is why the philosophy used to be ("in the old days") that HP was not interested in those businesses.

The popularity of HP printers seems to be the beginning of HP pursuing quantity rather than profit with quality. It was so easy to get sucked into the mentality of "if we can cut just a little bit more we can sell a lot more and be ranked #1 on [sales stats] report."

#37

Hmmm - the current market is awash in very inexpensive but powerful scientific calculators, especially from Casio and TI (I've even seen generic ones for US$1 in a "Dollar Store"). Obviously the margins are low and retailer display space is limited. So to spend a large amount of development (design, tooling, etc.) money to break into that established market is risky at best.

HP can either abandon the market altogether or work its way back in by leveraging the work of OEMs as they have for decades (anyone remember the Epson MX-80 dot matrix printer as an HP-IL peripheral 30 years ago?). I for one am glad to see them at least try. New higher end machines like the 39gII prove they're not giving up there, either, even if Tim and company are doing so with limited resources.

As far as RPN vs. algebraic: RPN is by *far* my preferred interaction for many reasons. But the reason it exists was that it was easier to impliment with extremely limited hardware in 1970. Marketing it as a feature is classic HP. Since schools universally teach written math and teach using calculators that understand things as written, it is no surprise that RPN is fading. Sad, and I mourn its fading, but not surprising.

I enjoyed my typewriter a lot (a treasured high school graduation gift) but don't see those in stores any more, either...

So, hooray again for the magnificent WP 34S team that keeps us RPN types equipped - and HP for the 50g, 12C, 15LE and others as well!


#38

OH yes, the Epson MX 80. THAT brings back memories. I loved the look of that one. Very bold, robust and professional.

What's stopping HP from marketing an RPN/RPL line to appeal to their niche and veteran aficionados? Maybe it's wishful thinking but, I think HP hasn't abandoned its RPN core. Perhaps, the 25+ year longevity of the 12C proves that RPN is still a viable and marketable logic system.


Edited: 2 Nov 2012, 11:43 p.m.


#39

Quote:
What's stopping HP from marketing an RPN/RPL line to appeal to their niche and veteran aficionados?

Nothing is stopping them! HP does market an RPN/RPL line to appeal to their niche and veteran aficionados. It currently consists of the 12C, 12c Platinum, 15C Limited Edition, 20b, 30b, 48gII, and 50g.


#40

Well, thanks for the reassurance. It was just that Jim Horn's comment in Message #11 that RPN was fading just alarmed me that RPN may be on the way out for HP calcs.

Edited: 3 Nov 2012, 2:21 a.m.


#41

Get a WP-34S and never look back....

RPN forever!


- Pauli


#42

I'd love to. How can I update the 34S with a Mac PowerBook G4 running OS/X 10.4.11? If someone can tell me how I can have a 34S and have my Mac running Tiger, I'd buy a 34S in a second!

Edited: 6 Nov 2012, 6:22 p.m.


#43

the easy way: click here

#44

Quote:
Get a stock OEM brand and put the HP logo! where's the "HP Invent!" ethos?
If HP does - great. Casio makes really good calculators, and especially their keyboards are rarely disappointing. I remember the fx-3600p had quite a short stroke, but still works flawlessly. It would be nice to see a HP fx-3650p :-).
#45

It isn't RPN - but I have definatly seen worse looking ones.

Edited: 28 Oct 2012, 12:54 p.m.


#46

My guess is that HP has decided not to make a new RPN scientific calculator since the last one was released over 5 years ago. Based on my observations, I have not seen a new engineer out of school with anything other than a TI or Casio calculator in years.

Edited: 29 Oct 2012, 4:18 p.m.


#47

Say it ain't so, Joe (yes, Steve). Frankly, with the HP stalwart loyals and younger RPN/RPL initiates, I hope HP realises that their older crowd is still alive, well and recruiting new members into the RPN membership.

#48

What's stopping HP from marketing an RPN/RPL line to appeal to their niche and veteran aficionados? Maybe it's wishful thinking but, I think HP hasn't abandoned its RPN core. Perhaps, the 25+ year longevity of the 12C proves that RPN is still a viable and marketable logic system.

#49

Calc-Bank's news are now automaticaly available in english for the english users.

I found the design very cool.


#50

Glad you like it. I too think they turned out to be a pair of fine looking machines.

TW


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