WP 34S flash adaptors now available



#54

Today I have assembled and tested the "final" (at least for) version of my flash adapter, and it worked as expected.
It allows you to directly connect your WP 34S to your computers USB port, so there is no need for the HP flash cable and USB to serial converter anymore.

In addition to this, the calculator runs on USB power while it is plugged in. This helps conserve battery, as you can just plug it in when you are running long programs. When you unplug the USB connector, it automaticly switches to battery.

There is also a resistor for the IR LED (for printing) on the board. The LED can be soldered directly to two pads on the board. The LED is not pre-installed, because the leads need to be cut and bend according to the position of the hole for the diode.

This is what the PCB looks like:

And this is how you install it:
First you need to cut away the plastic suports arround the top left screw post:

Then you can glue the PCB in place:

This is where the wire for the IR-Printing needs to be soldered:

You will also have to remove LB1 and LB2, connect battery, Vcc, GND, RxD and TxD and (if you haven't already done that) install the crystral and capacitors:

Detailed instructions of what to connect where will follow. This is just to give you an idea of the work involved in installing this.

Finaly you will have to drill a 3mm hole for the LED and cut a hole for the micro USB connector. This is a bit tricky if you want to be exact. I got the best results when drilling out the corners of the hole with a small (1.5 to 2mm drill) and then cutting the rest with a sharp knife. The result looks like this:

There is also a version that includes Lithium-Ion battery handling:

However it is even more work work to install this, as you have to make room for the battery. This does not include the resistor and the pads for the IR diode, so you will have to install those seperately.

And there is a very basic version for those who want neither printing nor switching to USB power.

Finaly I have also made a PCB to convert the HP flash cable from serial to USB. So no need for the USB to serial adapter anymore. This comes without the switches, which you will have to desolder from the original PCB and install in this one. You will also have to solder the two cables to the PCB:

And now (I hope this is OK on here, please remove if not) the prices. All prices include shipping within Germany, the rest of Europe will be 50 cents extra, the rest of the world +1 Euro:

Basic Flash Adaptor (without IR and USB power): 12.50 Euros

Flash Adaptor with USB-power and IR printing (including IR diode): 13.50 Euros

Flash adaptor with Li-Ion handling: 15.00 Euros

HP cable conversion kit: 13.00 Euros

And a few extras you might or might not need:

Crystal and Caps: 0.25 Euros

60mAh Li-Ion battery: 4.60 Euros

micro USB cable: 2.00 Euros

Edit: I have had a few questions about payment via PayPal. As I am not making a hughe profit on these, I am not too keen on Paypal, as I don't like them makeing more profit on these than I do. So I prefere bank transfer if possible. I appreciate this is not possible for everyone, especially for people from outside Europe. You can still pay via PayPal, but unfortunately I will have to add another Euro to the price to cover the fees. Sorry about that.

Look at the pictures for my email address. It is printed on the PCBs

PS: Initially I used a mini USB connector. In case you prefere that, I still have some Li-Ion boards left with that. They are the same price as the micro USB ones.

Edited: 28 May 2012, 8:12 a.m. after one or more responses were posted


#55

As a happy user of Harald's micro-USB Li-Ion charging board since one week, I can confirm it works great !

The USB flashing works fine, as well as the communication between my physical 34s and the emulator (Win 7 on a Mac).

As for the Li-Po battery, it fits nicely in place of one of the 2 CR-2032 battery holders, leaving the other one as a backup battery.

The battery capacity looks great for my use : daily program execution and lots of printing.

I have put up a couple of pictures showing the board in place.

Mounting Harald's board

Even though the charging board is a little bit longer than the basic ones, it is still possible to fit the IR Led beside, in the remaining place.

Please note :

- that I have an early version of the board.

- my soldering skills of micro-components are well below Harald's.

Therefore, please use his pictures and not mine as a reference for the board installation.

Thanks Harald for the great work and cheers to all!

Etienne

Edited : the Li-Ion handling version of the board doesn't have the 390ohms resistor.

Edited: 27 May 2012, 12:53 p.m.


#56

Thank you for the kind words Etienne! Glad you are happy with it.

Cheers,
Harald

#57

It's not clear to me if there exists a version with both IR printing and Li-ion charging circuitry.


#58

From Harald's post "This does not include the resistor and the pads for the IR diode, so you will have to install those seperately." , I understand the Li-Ion charging board does *not* include any IR printing components.

Exactly like mine.

I did the IR printing mod separately without a problem.


Etienne

#59

As Etienne has already said. The Li-Ion version does NOT include the IR printing. It is no problem to do that seperately though. You will need an IR diode and a 390 Ohm resistor. I can send you those as well.

Harald


#60

oops.

Slightly related... Would someone with write access to the wp34s wiki please update it with a page about this adapter board and perhaps another about the various options on IR functionality.

Edited: 27 May 2012, 7:45 p.m.


#61

I can do that, gladly.

Or, you should be able to do it yourself. Anyone who registers has write access to it. If you're having a problem getting in and making changes, please let me know.

My only caveat on me doing it is that it might be a bit before I can get to it -- I'm still fairly busy at work right now...

thanks,
bruce

#62

I have about 2/3 of a bag left and when these are gone--- they are gone. There will be no more.

FYI.

#63

WOW, seeing all those fantastic hardware extensions I'm wondering what comes next, maybe replacing the LCD with a 2-line full dotmatrix display? :-)

Then I'd say it's definitely time now to create a competition company to HP, maybe something like "WPM Calculator Inc.". ;-)

It would indeed be great if such an extended WP34s (with all those new additions like crystal, IR, USB port) would be produced professionally, and then I'd really buy one instead of just playing around with the emulator.

Franz


#64

Hello Franz,

I understand your point about having a professionally finished product in your hand.

However, from my point of view, I see as professional all the care taken to create, debug (with your help, Les, and others...), overlay (we have a bunch of them) and document this product.

I do use your TVM program because I feel it was developed with a care which is also professional to my eyes.

Mmm...let's see what's missing : a crippled display, the need to put stickers on keys...

Not that much to prevent one to move forward to the real thing.

So, by all means, I suggest you jump in, buy one of these 30EUR 30bs, flash it and see your TVM and Poly solver run and print on the real thing.

I think the fun is more in the transformation process from a 30B to a 34s than in trying to trigger an industrial or semi-industrial production that would come with it's own drawbacks.

And yes, I believe the 34s will have built in accurate weather forecast before Hp releases a product up to our demanding old timers expectations :-)

Cheers

Etienne


#65

Hi Etienne,

of course with my 'professional' I didn't mean that currently anything in the WP34s development is unprofessional - maybe it was just not the right word. What I rather meant was 'ready-built', so I don't have to do all those hardware extensions myself.

If I want a real WP34s then of course I want the 'full' version, i.e. with all those goodies, but I'm just too old to fiddle around with a soldering iron and printed circuit boards (I did it in the days when the first PCs came out, but not now anymore).

And the thing that I don't like at all are those keyboard labels - I just can't imagine that these stickers would live more than a few weeks or months if you heavily use the calculator.

Franz

Edited: 28 May 2012, 8:41 a.m.


#66

Eric has want you want: http://commerce.hpcalc.org/34s.php
Well, not the USB (yet?)

#67

I will be away for a few days and wanted to make this available before that. Sorry about the website with all the advertisment, I will need to find a better place for it when I get back.

Here are the instructions


Goog luck installing your flash adaptor! Feel free to ask any questions you might have.


#68

Harald, thanks for sharing. We can put the file on SVN if you agree.


#69

Hi Walter,

yes, SVN would be great!
Can you put it on there? Or can I log in myself?

Cheers,
Harald


#70

Quote:
Can you put it on there?
Yes I can if you send me the file :-)
Quote:
Or can I log in myself?

Dunno ;-)

#71

Harald,

If you want, you need to create yourself a sourceforge account, then ask Pauli to give you write access to the Files area.


#72

Personal mail sent.

Marcus can also do this change, but he's preoccupied at the moment.

- Pauli

Edited: 29 May 2012, 6:53 a.m.

#73

Nicely done!
Just a couple of questions: have you considered a custom flex circuit board for easy interconnection? would such solution be too expensive? Anyway, I will order one, but not now. Currently items from abroad are taking up to four months to be delivered, thanks to our over-zealous Customs :-(


#74

Excuse me Gerson, are these the ones (I mean the same kind) of the ribbon used in the HP41 and spices' series?


#75

Yes. It could be made to exactly match the pads on both boards, thus making connections less prone to mistakes. The extra cost would not compensate the benefits, if any, though.

#76

Quote:
Nicely done!

Thanks!
Quote:
Just a couple of questions: have you considered a custom flex circuit board for easy interconnection? would such solution be too expensive?

No, I haven't considered that. It certainly is more expensive, but to be honest I don't really see any value in that. The difficult connections are the ones to the calculator PCB, and I don't see how that could be simplyfied by a flex board. (Or does my imagination just not stretch that far?)

Quote:
Anyway, I will order one, but not now. Currently items from abroad are taking up to four months to be delivered, thanks to our over-zealous Customs :-(

Ouch, I might get complaints from my american customers then...

#77

Quote:

Ouch, I might get complaints from my american customers then...


Presumably not. Please note America is *far* more than the US of A (but don't tell them). Gerson was describing the customs (no pun intended) of his country ;-)

#78

Hehe :) I must have been thinking like an american, uhm... US american when I was writing that ;)


#79

remided me of this:

:)


#80

You often hear the phrase here in Canada: "Land of the free and the home of the hand gun"...

#81

The bigotry manifest by this posting is almost as offensive as the [supposed] bigotry that it portrays.

I saddens me when this forum becomes a clearinghouse for bashing us "Yanks."

Mark Hardman

Houston, TX


Edited: 29 May 2012, 10:24 p.m.


#82

Come on, people, let's stick to calculators, not race, politics and other similar ilk.


x<>y,cheers,

hpnut in Malaysia

#83

I am sorry if I offended anyone. It certainly was not meant as an offence. I found this "map" funny, so I thought I would share it.

But apparently not everybody has the same sort of humor.

Won't happen again...


#84

Harald,

Please accept my apologies. I think that I overreacted to something clearly intended as pure humor. Upon reflection, I reacted this way--not so much because it was offensive--but because it was sadly too true.

Mark Hardman

Houston, TX


#85

No need to apologize Mark. I should be more carefull with what I post. Humor doesn't always come accross that well in written form.

#86

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#87

Les, I really enjoyed reading your post. I fully agree, one of the strengths of this board is the participation and contributions by people around the world. That's a great community, and it demonstrates that knowledge and the desire to help others are international characteristics.

I'm afraid many US citizens have become complacent by not expecting much from their elected representatives. And that's a shame, because we certainly didn't start out that way. The following quote is from the Wikipedia article on Dr. Lyman Hall, representative from the state of Georgia to the second Continental Congress in 1776 that approved the Declaration of Independence. It is ironic that, while almost all US citizens rally around the Declaration of Independence, securing the rights enumerated in that document has not been easy for many groups, as you pointed out.

Quote:
Lyman Hall is portrayed in the 1969 Broadway musical 1776 and in the 1972 film of the same name by Jonathan Moore. As presented in the play and in the film, at a critical point in the struggle of John Adams to convince his fellow delegates to the Second Continental Congress to choose independence, Hall re-enters the chamber to change Georgia's vote. He says he has been thinking: "In trying to resolve my dilemma I remembered something I'd once read, 'that a representative owes the People not only his industry, but his judgment, and he betrays them if he sacrifices it to their opinion.' It was written by Edmund Burke, a member of the British Parliament." Hall then walks over to the tally board and changes Georgia's vote from "Nay" to "Yea."


Thanks for your post.

#88

You forgot the map of the US according to Texas:

Eric


#89

I love "SNAFU D.C." Also enjoy how East Texas encompasses the entire Mississippi delta. Most of the pronunciations are perfect phonetic renderings of a genuine "Texas Twang."

If I can laugh at this map, I surely can laugh at Harald's posting.

As fellow Houstonians, we need to get together someday and do lunch--my treat. Say Chuy's?

Mark Hardman

Edited: 30 May 2012, 11:07 p.m.


#90

That would be fun. In a funny coincidence, although I had not been to Chuy's in months, I ended up going twice last week.

These next two weeks I am busy with moving, and then I will be out of town for a couple weeks, but I'd be free in July. It would be fun to meet up then!

Eric


#91

I'd like to meet with you. If three is not a crowd let me know when and where. I live in the Clear Lake area.


Regards,

John


#92

I've set a reminder to organize a lunch sometime after the Independance Day holiday. If you're in the Houston area and are interested, please let me know and I'll add you to the list.

Mark Hardman

#93

We have the same one here with France regions seen by the French.

Sorry, no English version possible here...don't you all speak french :-))

La France vue par les français.

Now get to install your boards and report!

Etienne

Edited for typos


Edited: 31 May 2012, 2:36 a.m.


#94

Impressive variability d:-)

#95

It is as if someone had lifted all of the regional stereotypes from Les album d'Astérix et Obélix. Especially "Astérix en Corse."

I laughed until I wet myself.

Mark Hardman

Houston, TX

Paris (20eme), La Rochelle, Nanterre


#96

Agreed.

Stereotypes and prejudices, that's what it's all about and why it is funny.

And here (in France), we specialize in putting people in categories according to place of birth, age, nationality...

So I'm going to put you in a category :-)

Let's see...Houston TX, 20ème, Nanterre....

These 3 qualify you for a nice "côte de boeuf" and a bottle of Burgundy with me :-)

And with Geoff (already promised) when he elects to land in Paris.

Geoff, flash your CL with YFNZ-3, this should help you find CDG! :-)

Cheers

Etienne

#97

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#98

Les:

The French *were* very helpful to the Americans in the late 1700s. The problems started after we liberated them from the German occupation in WWII.

For a recent example, please see the massive French corruption associated with the "Oil for Food" program, in which the French did a huge business with Saddam Hussein, at the expense of the Iraqi people. No, the French have decided that they have no desire to be friends of the Americans.

Bruce.


#99

Years ago, I was told a tale tht goes more or less as follows:

G. K. Chesterton, the English writer, visited France; and it was not common to travel at his time. Upon return to the UK, ha was asked by his friend: "How do the French are?"

He answered: "I haven't had time to meet them all".

End of tale (and please disregard idiomatic mistakes).

I frequently tell this story (which has nothing specific about France or french people) to my students to stress that place-of-birth is really a poor measure of a person features, decisions, personal history, ideas, values and qualifications. I try never to say "Americans are so and so", "French are this and this", "Brazilians are that and that", because we are individuals, and very varied ones (I'm trying not to write "different").

There are many features of fellow aregentinians that I don't share; not because they are "good" or "bad", but just because I may have different views or opinions. I assume the same is valid for other people; so please let us think about individuals and not about categories defined by place-of-birth.

Just my AR$ 0.10


Well said, Andrés! Surely worth much more than just AR$ 0.10!

Quoting from the movie My Name Is Khan:

"There are only two kinds of people in this world. Good people who do good deeds. And bad people who do bad. That's the only difference in human beings. There's no other difference."

This may be rather oversimplified but the film is worth watching, despite its three-hour duration.

Best regards,

Gerson.


Agree, great movie and very enlightening. Recommended to all.

Hi, Gerson:

Quote:
"There are only two kinds of people in this world. Good people who do good deeds. And bad people who do bad. That's the only difference in human beings. There's no other difference."

Nice quote but wish it were that simple in real life.

The problem is, of course, the definition of "good" and "bad". What some people consider unmistakably "good" other people consider unmistakably "bad" and vice versa, so their respective definitions of who's "good people" and who's "bad people" are exact opposites of one another and we're back at the start.

Best regards from V.


Ditto!

Luiz (Brazil)


Hi Luiz, hi all, how are you?
I missed this post and just now I see that was....... bloody: somebody was deleted....


Hi, Aurelio;

Yep, I'm in a hurry here...

About posts deletion: chances are the one who posted decided to delete his own posting. I saw some follow-ups quoting some passages and mentioning some names, and we may find some strong words that might/should not be there. Anyway, from time to time we face this kind of circumstance here, but the MoHPC (D.H.'s, I mean) bloodline is strong, always prevails.

Cheers.

Luiz (Brazil)

Also, acts can be good, or bad. All people commit both. Some get caught and some don't.

Quote:
...so please let us think about individuals and not about categories defined by place-of-birth.

Andres:

I do agree with your sentiment. However, in this case, with the exception of Sarkozy (who was recently voted out), we have 60 years of history that clearly demonstrates how the French government felt about America.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/France%E2%80%93United_States_relations:

Quote:
...led to de Gaulle's decision in 1966 to withdraw French forces from the integrated military structure of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) and to expel NATO from its headquarters at Fontainebleau. De Gaulle's foreign policy was centered on an attempt to limit the power and influence of both superpowers [England and America], which would increase France's international prestige in relative terms. De Gaulle hoped to move France from being a follower of the United States to a leading First World power with a large following among certain non-aligned Third World countries.


...


France, more strongly than any other nation, has seen the European Union as a method of counter-balancing American power, and thus works towards such ends as having the Euro challenge the preeminent position of the United States dollar in global trade and developing a European defense initiative as an alternative to NATO.

Yes, those French leaders were but a few people, but the fact that they stayed in power---and not against the will of the people---definitely says something about the majority of French voters.

Bruce.


Like individuals have their individual abilities, energies, and ambitions, also groups of individuals have and even peoples. And since mankind has lived 99.9% of its existence in small groups, differentiating between "us" and "them" is in our genes. When times get tough this heritage will determine a lot of our actions. And since "we" belong to different groups, ... !

IMHO, this alone explains quite well why the happiness about XYZ rule isn't a global phenomenon (insert for XYZ e.g. Egyptian, Roman, French, British, US-American, Soviet, Chinese, etc. etc.). Power corrupts people and peoples. All empires tend becoming superstitious earlier or later. Young nations, not knowing this yet, will learn it by experience some day. For sure. Human history is full of proofs :-/

P.S.: Nevertheless or even thus it may be great fun teasing those who believe they rule in our time ;-)


Edited: 1 June 2012, 4:59 p.m.

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A francophile that comes quite often to a forum dedicated to an American product.

Quote:
Yes, those French leaders were but a few people, but the fact that they stayed in power---and not against the will of the people---definitely says something about the majority of French voters.

No, it says nothing because we do not choose our president because of the future US/France relationship they intend to promote.
This is even a non-subject in the presidential campaigns.

And the Wikipedia article about De Gaulle is just a simplistic view of a much more complex problem.
Of course, you selected the sentence describing the biggest disagreement between French & USA governments in over 200 years... During which both countries were never at war but fought several together...


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Quote:
..or the very long tentacles of a military so bloated and expensive that the world's largest country can't wrap its collective head about providing basic universal healthcare that every other Western country takes for granted..

You have an axe to grind with America. We get it.
Now can you kindly take your sorely OT and frankly
beyond annoying diatribe to an appropriate forum
elsewhere?

Moderator?

Quote:
... the world's largest country can't wrap its collective head about providing basic universal healthcare that every other Western country takes for granted ...

The healthcare issue is indeed hardly comprehensible for a foreigner (but what do I know about the secrets of thinking in the USA?). Anyway, "the world's largest country" is still Russia, followed in significant distance by Canada, then the USA ... In a way, however, this is regarded as a typical error of US citizens ;-)

Edited: 3 June 2012, 3:52 p.m.


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Quote:
..it is important to point out that innovation, motivation, inspiration, and industry are not uniquely American virtues.

Who do you anticipate needs to have this pointed out?
Indeed the only mention made here of "innovation, motivation, inspiration, and industry" occurs in your posts.

Quote:
Two Germans and an Australian gave us WP34S and another German its expansion board. France has given us EMU41 and PIL-Box. Spain has given us the Clonix family.

While not in any way diminishing these or other tribute
efforts, they are obviously in the spectrum of cloned to
derived works and are not comparable to the revolutionary
engineering and marketing work forged by HP some 40 years ago.

Quote:
I really do think that if Packard and Hewlett had had their famous garage in Stockholm or Frankfurt or Paris or Barcelona or Toronto, we'd still have our calculators today.

I seriously doubt that. Furthermore I doubt the infamous garage
situated at any other location in the US would have produced
a comparable result.

Even reducing the scope of speculation to the calculator
market alone, perhaps the closest alternate contender to
achieve HP's success could have been among
a small number of Japanese
manufacturers who were engaged in relatively advanced
calculator development at that time.

But we'll never know. What we do know is HP had deftly executed
on a legendary strategy which defined a market and set the
standard for its products. The success of this effort may be
measured four decades later where that same market is virtually
extinct, and enthusiasts carry on the legacy.

I'd suggest you to find some way to be at peace with the
accomplishment having been achieved by an American company.

Pascal:

(Sorry; I was away from the forum for a while!)

Quote:
No, it says nothing because we do not choose our president because of the future US/France relationship they intend to promote

That's a fair rebuttal.

Quote:
Of course, you selected the sentence describing the biggest disagreement between French & USA governments in over 200 years... During which both countries were never at war but fought several together...

I didn't mean to imply that France and the U.S. were in any way *enemies*, I was just pointing out that---judging by actions---post-WWII France has had no intention of being a close ally of the U.S., but rather feels that it must be a counter-weight against the U.S. Remember, my post was in response to a Canadian's questioning why many Americans view France with suspicion, in contrast to good feelings about our relationship with the U.K. (current U.S. president not withstanding!).

I suspected that my explanation (opinion) would not sit well with some, but it was really not meant to be an attack on the French. I will be the first to admit that the U.S. would not exist without assistance from the French in the 18th century. But in my opinion, most French are loathe to admit that the same is true in reverse, with respect to WWII.

Anyway, I enjoyed the political O.T., and I hope there are no hard feelings.

Bruce.


Quote:
I didn't mean to imply that France and the U.S. were in any way *enemies*, I was just pointing out that---judging by actions---post-WWII France has had no intention of being a close ally of the U.S., but rather feels that it must be a counter-weight against the U.S. Remember,

Yes, I get that. I never read your post as an attack but as a point of view and offered a different one.
In my opinion, the relationship cannot be defined simply because:

- it is true that France policy is to keep its influence (now through UE too) and not fully align with US policy.
- Another point was the doubt De Gaulle had about the US nuclear umbrella. As you may know, his relationship with Churchill & Roosevelt was not an easy one during WWII and he decided his country would be better with the means to prevent an future invasion by itself
- Saying France and US are not "close allies" is maybe an overstatement. The most accurate description I read is that France is a "difficult" ally, meaning it does not hesitate to voice his disagreements and to act on it but can still be counted on in difficult time.

Quote:
But in my opinion, most French are loathe to admit that the same is true in reverse, with respect to WWII.

As a country, France does not have a point of view. But concerning what the US did to free the country, I'm not sure that so many people do not admit it. But I guess most think that it should not influence today's policies.

And this is just limited to foreign policy. US culture influence in France is huge, business interests too, around 50000 US citizens living in Paris only (and the ones I know being quite happy about it).
Meaning there is no anti-US sentiment on a daily basis, just a political debate that occurs sometimes, but not that often on what to copy from the US and what to do differently.


So, no hard feelings at all. You are entitled to your opinion and your perceptions. And as long as we can talk politely, it is a pleasure hearing yours.


Edited: 6 June 2012, 1:46 a.m.


The impression I gathered during the time I lived in France was that the French were leery of American hegemony but otherwise liked the American ex-pats. But the same could be said for any other western country and it's people who made an effort to "fit in".

Of course most of what I learnt about French culture was from "Fluide Glacial", so take my impression with a grain of salt...

Various political agitators in the U.S. (generally "conservative in nature) regularly attempt to demonize French policy. (This has a peculiarly delicious outcome in the current presidential race for obvious reasons--watching Romney one is reminded that politicians rarely speak their true feelings.)

Some Americans fall for this duping.

In the U.S. business community, there has long been a love-hate relationship with the French, or perhaps more specifically Parisians. "Paris is great--it's just the French I can't stand" would be a typical paraphrase. This has nothing to do with politics but rather with culture.

Frankly ("Americanly?") I feel it is a problem of narrowminded arrogance of some Americans rather than t'other way 'round. Germans are extraordinarily gracious hosts and much more likely to be accomodating to the cultural faux pas of expat Americans. But that is merely my own personal sense.

The fact is that France and the French have every right--even duty--to be french in every way, including taking their political and military *independence* seriously.

Let us never forget Lafayette, The Statue of Liberty, and a thousand other Gallic Good Deeds.

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That's an interesting point. But I suppose one could also wish to stop worrying about Franklin, or de Tocqueville, or Adams, or Jefferson, or Arnold, or....

I don't think we can ever escape thinking of Lafayette in the context of history. I don't know that we are taught to consider our relations with France in any way that is specifically shaped by Lafayette's actions. Rather, the lesson is to understand that there is a long history of French-U.S. friendly relations.

Perhaps we could use this as a foil to compare the treatment of U.S. -- German relations historically. There doubtless is a 20th century construct tending to demonize the Germans far more. We all learn that Washington crossed the Delaware to confront the "Hessian mercenaries." Yet such a large fraction of Americans have German roots that this is modulated in some ways. Furthermore, German and Germany are different things and the German nation much newer than the French one. There are important parallels between France and the US, while Germany is a source of people and culture but not national identity to Americans...and of course WWII makes everything complicated in that regard, too.

Quote:
Hadn't they already tried that? Wasn't there something called the Maginot line?

This kind of remark if not really helpful. Because there is a difference between such a mistake and nuclear weapons...

And maybe I'm wrong here but I sense the same logic I see so many times in US movies, books... That the US army is mighty and never lost a war and that the french one is supposed to surrender immediately.
In fact, this is such a common joke is US culture that some must believe it is true.

Quote:
Many in the U.S.A. would like to see the time when we are no longer told that what Lafayette did must influence the way we think of France.

Well, I agree this is not relevant to define today relationships but I think you underestimate the amount of French bashing and cultural misunderstanding we can perceive from this way of the Atlantic ocean. For a recent example, read: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_positions_of_Mitt_Romney#France

So going back to basics and remembering some people with apparently a very limited knowledge of history (as well as what a non-US political & social system might be) that they needed a little help to build the country they are so (rightfully) proud of is a good idea.
See it as our socialist contribution to compensate for the poor performance of the US public education system :-)


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Quote:
And I think you underestimate the amount of U.S.A. bashing and cultural understanding we can perceive from this side of the Atlantic.

I do not think so. I worked in the US, had and still have friends there and I try to see the good & bad things both sides.

But I think that there is indeed a huge misunderstanding which usually comes from sticking to cliches instead of having real, first-hand knowledge...


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Be careful! Some may not recognize what is obviously intended as humor, parody, and satire, in the same vein as A Modest Proposal. It certainly gave me a chuckle.

Edited: 8 June 2012, 2:23 p.m.

Caricature? Cliché?

In France, there is a caricature-saying among others.

"Americans are chocked because in France, girls are topless on beach, and Frenches are chocked because in America, you can buy guns on TV shopping."

To which I answer "Chacun sa merde" which translate as "Everybody its own shit", which means that i am glad to be French in this case :)

Patrice


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Homicide is sometimes said to be "an endangered crime species" because the rate is low and has been divided by 2 in the last 20 years or so.

Also, 80% to 90% of them are solved.

So yes, this is a reason to be glad to be French (or European, or Singaporean...)

Or course, if you start a software company, it is not the same...

What amazes me is the amount of very simplistic variants of "mine is better than yours" arguments one can read here when the smart things would be to get the better idea wherever they come from.

For instance, when our politicians talk about copying the US in France, it has to do with less government but usually as less health care system, less teachers, a less efficient police more obsessed by statistics...
Strangely enough, it has nothing to do with less unemployment & more venture capital, innovation...


Quote:
Or course, if you start a software company, it is not the same...

I don't know what you have in mind with this sentence.

But I am happy to be European because in Europe there is no software copyright, which is perceived as a good thing here.

When I see all the bogus patents granted on everything and anything, I fear that lawyer degree is needed more than anything else.

Agreed.

O Canada!
Vive le Quebec! (which have a special place in our heart)



Another difference between USA and France.


Americans were chocked about what did Bill and Monica, it was a serious matter for all of them.

In France we think it was a serious matter for Hillary.

[Portions removed by moderator. Please end the political discussion.]

Edited: 10 June 2012, 1:20 a.m. after one or more responses were posted


OK, notwithstanding the fact that people who don't live in the United States have no real idea what US citizens really think or believe (nor do they know anything about the quality of our education system), and the word is shocked, not chocked, this post is really in very poor taste and should be deleted. Come on guys, this has nothing to do with HP calculators and I as well as many others are offended by this post.


Quote:
Come on guys, this has nothing to do with HP calculators and I as well as many others are offended by this post.

I find it odd given the innumerable internet forums where
such rambling is actually welcome, that someone would
choose to inflict the above inconsiderate gibberish on us here.
Understandably things do go awry occasionally in any public forum. But a word to the wise will typically clean things up. I'd
attempted to do so, however now realize that premise was flawed.

A casual observer may well find it comical the only stones being
thrown are indeed by non-Americans, under the guise of chastising
poor manners and intolerant, narcissistic behaviour.
As such, it would seem thanks is due to you for your effort,
the result of which portrays Americans favourably.

I have a beautiful musical instrument made by a luthier in Buenos Aires, and furthermore Germán Frers is Argentinian.

Therefore, all Argentines are the best. :-)


Argentine beef, wine, and RPN calculators are pretty good too.


Nice references, thank you for bringing them here!

Of course, we (as a country) have our own share of mistakes in many political, ecoonomical, and other matters (even sports and urban traffic!). And a big agenda full of problems to be solved.

As elsewhere, there are nice places and nice people here too!

Hello Walter,

It's my fault. I should have mentioned I am in Brazil, South America. Anyway, for
those not so acquainted with Geography, this map of the Americas might be of help :-)

(From this world map)

Gerson.


You guys are all upside down. Do you tie yourself to the ground, or how do you manage not to fall away from the earth? ;)

LOL. reminds me of the map favored by some New Yorkers. Pretty much ends at the East River. Actually that is "New Yorkers" as defined *BY* New Yorkers. That is, you live in Manhattan.

Cheers,

-Marwan

Thanks Bart for your email! I made a mistake in the document (can't correct it until I am back in two days).
The connection on the right, marked "Bat +" on the calculator PCB isn't Bat+ but Vcc. Bat+ are the two battery terminals which get connected togather. Labeled to the left of the calculator PCB.

Also I forgot to mark where GND is connected. That is the wire going to the capacitor on the top right of the calculator PCB. Basically the only unmarked one.

Sorry for the mistake, aparently I did this a bit too quickly yesterday...

Edited: 29 May 2012, 6:26 a.m.


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