11C's potential



#9

Hello all.

I've been toying with the idea that, like the 55 post I wrote a month ago, the 11C does have some generous and robust programming gusto. As I posted earlier too, it would seem the 11C is a nice extension of my favourite, the 29C. While less than a 34C but more than the 33C and quite a bit more versatile than the 10C, what potential does the 11C have?


#10

I guess the answer would depend on whether you need complex numbers or not. I like the uncluttered keyboard and the simple programming model, but the 15C has all that and also the complex numbers. Matrices are better dealt with on a PC (although back then I did matrix calculations on my 28C/S), but complex numbers are handy to have on a pocket calc if you're an EE. You could argue that a few simple programs would add that capacity on your 11C, but that's not the same thing. For mechanical/civil engineers, the 11C is a fine machine.


#11

Hi.

Quote:
(...) complex numbers are handy to have on a pocket calc if you're an EE.
Topographers may also take the advantage of solving surveying problems with less keystrokes.

Cheers.

Luiz (Brazil)

Edited: 14 May 2012, 2:39 a.m.

#12

For my interests and usage, my 29C is more a stay-at-home calculator because of its collectable status and the delicate nature of Woodstocks. Secondly, from a function set and programming standpoint, aside from the Rapid Reverse Branching and memory register proportion at 98 steps, the 11C seems to fit and even exceed the 29C's capabilities.

As a matter of reference & comparison/benchmark, thanks to the Museum DVD, I've browsed through the 19C/29C Application Books. From what I saw, all these programs, even the 98-step ones, with the 11C's memory proportion at that stage, will coincide with the register requirements of each program in all of the programs from the 19C/29C Application Packs.

On the other note, as I also have a 15C, if I need a 29C with a boost, the 15C (or even the 42S) would serve to enhancing my programming conversions of 29C apps.

Edited: 14 May 2012, 8:43 p.m.

#13

Quote:
...and quite a bit more versatile than the 10C, what potential does the 11C have?

You might find your answer by reading Valentin Albillo's short story Time Voyager.

#14

Thanks. I'll take a read.


Just finished reading it. Amazing and very amusing!! Thanks.


Edited: 14 May 2012, 9:47 p.m.

#15

Quote:
While less than a 34C but more than the 33C and quite a bit more versatile than the 10C, what potential does the 11C have?

I was presented with an HP-11C back in 1981 and it was the one HP calculator I used the most till I got my first HP-15C twentysome years later.

While the HP-15C is much more capable in the same form factor and package, the HP-11C served me well and I took it with me to the Sahara desert for a year, under military conditions. Needless to say, it performed flawlessly in so harsh an environment and I managed to awe all the officers with some clever programming, to the point that several of them asked to buy it from me.

That I wouldn't do and it's still with me 31 years later, in perfect shape, almost as new, and working fine. Just 2 changes of batteries in all that time, by the way.

Regards.
V.


#16

Fantastic! I'm glad that HP's craftsmanship and technical wizardry has served you so well some 30+ years later. It's truly an encouraging testimonial for me as a fellow collector and user of the HPs from their golden era.


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