What's your flavour?



#17

Hello all.

As an RPN/RPL advocate but also multi-lingual, I would be interested in how those of you here switched over (not from PC to Mac) but from calculator entry methods. Whether it be from AOS to RPN, EOS to AOS, EOS to EES (Equation Entry System) or CAS (or any other route), I would like to learn your insights.

Thanks

Edited: 25 Mar 2012, 12:00 a.m.


#18

When I was little, I used my father's SR something.

My own first calculator (10th grade) was an 11c. That, and RPN, was all I ever cared to own for a long time. I lost that machine in 94 or 95. I replaced it with a 32sii. At the time, I saw the algebraic pioneers and turned my nose up at them.

In more recent years, following on my discovery of this museum way back like 10 years ago, I have become very multi-lingual from an entry standpoint.

Today, I tend to prefer the algebraics (gasp!). Of course I like RPN, too. Sometimes RPN feels better. Sometimes not.

Good algebraics beat the pants off RPN. If you have swap, last, or other features like that, or memory, or "ans" or history, you can do a lot, very efficiently, and you can see what the heck you did more clearly with an algebraic.

RPN is "natural" only for direct computations. It isn't natural at all for expression building. Gentlemen: start your engines. Flames are welcome :-)


#19

Which algebraic Pioneers were those? Speaking of Algebraic, what are your impressions of the entry methods of the SR-56 or TI-58C, for example?

Edited: 25 Mar 2012, 12:45 a.m.


#20

1. HP 20s, 21s, 22s, 27s. I've only owned the 20s and 27s.

2. Although I started life using an SR something, I don't know which one it was. And I am ignorant of Ti in any detail other than generally knowing how the Ti 30 worked in various forms up until recently. I had a programmable Ti-50something once. It had a sloped display. I inherited it and it had Ti-itis. Too bad.


#21

Oh, them! I forgot the family name of my 27S, 32S-II, 42S and 20S. And, I'm supposed to know my own kids?!

Edited: 25 Mar 2012, 1:24 a.m.

#22

Quote:
Today, I tend to prefer the algebraics (gasp!).

Please tell me that at least you are talking about HPs...


#23

Yes....mostly. :-D

Watch me say something different some years from now. My opinion has been evolving. I was an RPN monoculturist for all my adult life until recently.

#24

The very first calculator I ever had in my hands was the HP 35 of a friend of mine. But that was just for a single day. When I was able to buy my own it was an SR-51A and I played a lot with it. I was especially fond of the linear regression which proved useful in physics classes at high school ("Gymnasium") in the mid seventies. The main drawback of these early TIs was the lack of parenthesis and full hierarchy: It just did multiply/divide/exponentiation before add/subtract. For anything more complicated you had to use one of the three (?) memory registers. Once a linear regression was active almost no other calculator function was available due to the lack of memory. My classmates were still using pencil, paper, tables and their Aristo slide rules...

I made progress, gave my 51A to my elder sister and replaced it by a programmable SR-56 with full AOS and parenthesis. The SR-56 was the last TI with a reliable keyboard for quite a few years. The early TI-30s and their more capable siblings all developed TIitis. I replaced my SR-56 with a TI-59 and caught the same disease.

In the early eighties I switched to computers, starting with a TRS-80 clone. Gone were the days of pocket calculators, except a few detours in pocketable BASIC land such as the Casio PB-700 or the Sharp PC 1261. Using their EOS like entry scheme was never very practical for calculations but fine for programming. I'm a programmer at last. :-)

Fast forward a few decades: eBay made it possible to find all the gadgets I could never afford when I would have needed them most. Now they are just toys (as opposed to computers which are my tools). Among them replacements for my long gone original TIs
but also my first RPN calculators, a 35, a 41. It has started a passion as you can imagine.

For the few calculations I have to do nowadays I very much prefer RPN for manual calculations. When it comes to more complicated formulae or even symbolic manipulation I reach for an algebraic because I like the history function. One of my favorites is the TI-92 line of calculators (including the Voyage 200). RPL's habit of dropping complicated algebraic expressions off the stack with each operation bogs me.


#25

"RPL's habit of dropping complicated algebraic expressions off the stack with each operation bogs me."


Haha, that's why you have to it ENTER twice :-)


#26

Quote:
"Haha, that's why you have to hit ENTER twice :-)"

Say it ain't so, Joe!

Jeff


#27

once onto the stack level 1, to be operated or evaluated; again to fill stack level 2 as a backup.


#28

My comment was directed at Marcus. ^^

Jeff

#29

In junior high school we got hooked on TI-30 Galaxy (must have been late 80s, it is still working and I have now passed it on to my son). Later I switched to a Sharp E500. Only at university I got acquainted with HPs (my first was a used 48SX). Since that time I have only used HPs and RPN and probably spent to much money for preloved calculators...

Still I am impressed with the longevity of my first calculator, it also set my preference for the landscape format.

#30

Quote:
Hello all.

As an RPN/RPL advocate but also multi-lingual, I would be interested in how those of you here switched over (not from PC to Mac) but from calculator entry methods. Whether it be from AOS to RPN, EOS to AOS, EOS to EES (Equation Entry System) or CAS (or any other route), I would like to learn your insights.

Thanks


I like RPN for the ability not having to use many pairs of parenthesis in calculators. I first learned RPN in 2000, 10 years after I first used scientific calculators.

Today I work with both RPN and EOS.

#31

When I was in high school (mid-1980s), my parents bought me my first programmable calculator, a TI-66. It's a great little machine, well documented, and I spent days writing programs for it. We already had an Apple II computer at home, so I was familiar with programming (BASIC and some 6502 assembler). A high school friend had an HP-11C and he showed me how RPN worked. I liked the idea but stayed with my TI-66. We spent hours arguing about which calculator was the best.

When I went to college, I read about the new HP-28S and knew I had to buy one, even if it meant surviving on ramen for a few weeks. It was incredibly useful in linear algebra, saving me from computing dozens of dreary determinants. I tried really hard to love RPL, but it never clicked, and I grew tired of clicking through menu after menu to get to the functions I wanted.

So after two years I got an HP-32SII. I almost went for the 42S, but the 32SII's two function keys and large number of commands accessible from the keyboard were the deciding factor. Now that I have both, I still think I made the right choice. The 42S is certainly more powerful, but for my needs I find the 32SII more usable.

I still have all calculators mentioned here, and they are all in working order. The HP-32SII I bought in college gets used almost daily at work, and at home I use an HP-15LE I bought recently.

#32

I was 13 or 14 and learned RPN on a 25C. I don't remember if I learned it from the manual or my brother, who owned the 25C. In any case, I do remember seeing the benefits immediately. You solve the problem the way you would by hand. You never had to worry about how many parenthesis to open up either.


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