Thank You Tony Duell



#4

I have been recently looking at the HP-41C Software library. Most of the applications there were submitted by J-M Baillard and Tony Duell. The ones Tony submitted includes .raw files which can be quickly downloaded into the HP-41C emulator offered by TOS. The documentation for these programs are found on the HP museum DVD and/or TOS. This makes the process of running these programs a breeze since one needs not enter a single line of code! I want to thank Tony for his brilliant contribution that makes it so easy to run HP-41C (and also converted HP-67) programs in the HP-41C AND Tom Okken's HP-42S emulator.

Namir


#5

Indded thanks are due to both these gentlemen.

Jean-Marc Baillard has single-handedly written a library of tremendous value, a real achievement that still today continues to grow on his own, dedicated site
http://hp41programs.yolasite.com

It's worth millions to anyone interested in calculator programming and of course Math. Thanks!


Edited: 5 Jan 2011, 2:26 a.m.


#6

Ángel, thanks for that link!

#7

I visit JMB's site frequently to see what new gems he's come up with.

Ángel, when are the quaternion M-code routines appearing?? :-)


- Pauli


#8

Quote:
Ángel, when are the quaternion M-code routines appearing?? :-)

I'll leave it up to Jean-Marc to decide that, but the theme is gaining momentum judging by the recent activity on his site!

#9

Hi Paul,

I've just added the quaternion M-Code routines.

Best wishes

Jean-Marc.


#10

Now to incorporate them into something like Ángel's complex stack support but for quaternions...

Unfortunately, I can't currently do M-code on my 41. I'll have to wait for the Newt to reach fruition...

- Pauli


#11

Quote:
Now to incorporate them into something like Ángel's complex stack support but for quaternions...

While it'd be possible to extend the "complex stack" concept to Quaternions (just by doubling the buffer size and modifying the housekeeping routines) I'm not sure that the benefits would be that noticeable - at least to warrant the programming effort.

Think that inputing quaternions requires the four real stack levels, and that the calculator display is not suited to display the four components together - it barely fits the two complex real and imaginary parts.

Anyway this is just a first-gut thought, maybe Jean-Marc has some suggestions on how it could be handled.

And Pauli, you can always use an emulator to do your MCODE programming... so roll up your sleeves and get to it! :)

Best,
AM

Edited: 7 Jan 2011, 3:00 a.m.


#12

Quote:
Anyway this is just a first-gut thought, maybe Jean-Marc has some suggestions on how it could be handled.

Just a thought. Complex support is a subset of quaternions so why not do both???


Quote:
And Pauli, you can always use an emulator to do your MCODE programming... so roll up your sleeves and get to it! :)

Yeah, I know about the emulators. I'd prefer to do it on the real device (which is what I take to work every day). Sadly, I've not bought anything M-code related yet, althought the Newt will be a must have.


BTW: I started assembly in the 1970's on an 8008 and am still doing it to this day on a variety of CPUs. I think I've suffered enough already :-)


- Pauli


#13

Quote:
I started assembly in the 1970's on an 8008 and am still doing it to this day on a variety of CPUs. I think I've suffered enough already

Recalls memories of my years with pdp assembler 1979 ± 4. I don't want to miss it, but that was enough for me ;)

#14

Quote:
Recalls memories of my years with pdp assembler 1979 ± 4. I don't want to miss it, but that was enough for me ;)

8, 10 or 11?

Suffered through them all :-)


- Pauli


#15

Assembler programming a pdp 11/10 with tremendous 64kB memory, 2.5MB fixed HDD plus another 2.5MB mobile disk plus 1600bpi magtape. Using other pdp 11 and VAX computers as well as IBM mainframes of that time. No PCs yet. Those where the days ... ;)

Forgot mentioning said pdp 11/10 was then sufficient for fast (i.e. kHz then) online acquisition and analysis of nuclear physics data in accelerator experiments. And - for our younger forumers - that device in a rack 2m high, 0.6m wide and 0.8m deep was mobile computing at that time ;)

FWIW

Edited: 8 Jan 2011, 3:39 a.m.

#16

Quote:
Just a thought. Complex support is a subset of quaternions so why not do both???

Well, it's not as simple as that. The complex buffer relies on the (real) stack levels Y&Z for synchronization before and after any complex function. That'd be completely different with quaternions of course. Add to that the fact that quaternion math isn't the same as complex (or real) math, and you'll have right there a couple of serious issues - or at least reasons why the complex buffer implementation isn't valid for quaternions without extensive mods.

Cheers,
'AM

#17

I agree. Jean-Marc's work is amazing!! I have contemplated programming some numerical algorithms and said to myself that it would not fly on an HP-41C, only to discover that Jean-Marc has already implemented these algorithms on an HP41C.


#18

Many thanks to all !


With respect to quaternions,

the module is going to be created.


Is it really useful? I don't know.

May be some quaternionic special functions

are not built-in in Mathematica?

But we can do it with an HP-41 !


All the Best

Jean-Marc.


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