If I do this...



#21

http://space.1337arts.com/hardware

and attach a HP calculator, would the calculator qualify for a post in my blog?


#22

Well your blog is about space exploration, so one would have to get the calculator into space. This group didn't come close. They went 17.5 miles high. There is no sudden transition into space, but space is typically defined as beginning at 100 km, about 62 miles high. The US defines an astronaut as someone who has been at least 50 miles high (though I think this definition was created to award a couple of X-15 pilots their astronaut wings). No balloon will ever get into space. The highest research balloons can get about half way there. You need a sounding rocket.


#23

:-(


#24

Shame on physics ;)


#25

My original post was done in jest!


#26

... and my response, too.


#27

We're a bunch of jokers.


#28

Well, I was disappointed so few liked the humor I intended here.
I even threw in a special line for you.

Edited spelling.

Edited: 15 Sept 2009, 4:09 p.m.


#29

Ha! I didn't catch that one. And yes, it's true I do this. This forum is a bit more sedate than the usual guitar forums I read but I like to throw curve-balls...

#30

---------------------------------------------------

The US defines an astronaut as someone who has been at least 50 miles high

---------------------------------------------------

During the 60's, I think my roommate might have made it a few times... and he never had to leave the room! LOL ;o)

#31

thanks, hecube. this is an awesome project, very cost effective too.

hpnut in malaysia


#32

We may have to start a contest: Who can get his/her calculator the highest, for no particular reason.


#33

Don't tempt me. As has already been observed in this thread, I'm already known for starting random threads...

Edited: 15 Sept 2009, 10:06 p.m.


#34

Hmm. . . I had several at 14,240 feet about a month ago. I think let's exclude planes or flying objects. Makes it more interesting! :-)

TW


#35

Tim, have you been there?


#36

Yup. That was it. Had my work bag with some calcs and a computer in the trunk. :-)

TW

#37

Tim: I once took a watermelon to 14,400 on mt Rainier. This was before i discovered RPN. A calculator would be much more interesting - but less juicy.

#38

For one, we have a 747 pilot on this forum. He, or any military pilot, can easily exceed any altitude posted by terrestrial mortals.

However, I believe freight jets fly higher than passenger jets (but not military jets!), so if one can time it right, and have an altimeter attached to I/O, one might get his/her calculator higher than a 747, while not carrying the device.


#39

Hello!

Quote:
However, I believe freight jets fly higher than passenger jets (but not military jets!), so if one can time it right, and have an altimeter attached to I/O, one might get his/her calculator higher than a 747, while not carrying the device.

Most freighters are converted airliners that have the same airframe and powerplants as the passenger version and therefore identical performance values. Typical service ceilings of these aircraft are between 41,000 and 43,000 feet, independently of their configuration. The altimeter in your freighter however will not read more than 8,000 feet because the cargo holds are pressurised!

If you want your calculator taken to higher altitudes, you either put it on board of a Space Shuttle or Soyus spacecraft, a military fighter jet or a business jet. Even "my" (my bosses to be precise, but I get paid for flying it) little Citation reaches 45,000 ft. (Others like Learjets and Gulfstreams go above 50.000ft.) And we have an unpressurised baggage compartment, so your altimeter will actually read that figure. Some of my HP calculators have been there already - but without an altimeter attached to prove it...

And regarding the subject: If anyone wants to reapeat the experiment, _please_ get the necessary permissions from the relevant aviation authority. A one-Kilogram box with equipments can cause millions (Dollars/Euros) worth of damage to an aeroplane and endanger hundreds of people on board!

Greetings, Max


#40

50.000 imperial feet = 15,2 km in real units, just for better understanding ...


Forum Jump: