Whether to buy a "reclaimed HP41CV"



#2

Having got the bug of the HP41 calculator range from using the I41cx on the Iphone, I have been watching Ebay auctions but prices seem to be around £170 for a CV or a CX which is just too much just to try to feel and hear the satisfying click of the keys and to handle a real machine.

I have got the chance to buy a reclaimed CV , no modules or battery but which is powered by an external battery pack or a USB cable link to a PC. Cost only £ 28.00. Is it worth this ?

So do I buy that or wait for the real thing or will buying this reclaimed calculator just fuel my desire to get a real one !!

Comments and thoughts welcomed !

Nigel


#3

Wait another 6 months or so and you'll get a lot more for your money.


#4

Please, save us all some suspense, and tell us why.

I've seen similar advice over the past 10 years or so that I have had the HP collecting bug. Sometimes it is good to wait. Most times it is not.


#5

Well, let's see...shall we go back to 2003 or whenever it was that the 32sii was canceled? Or to a little while later when the 48GX was finally put to rest? Or when the 50G established its presence?

In every case, prices for useful (not shamtique) machines changed markedly. 32sii spiked when canceled. But after the 33s came out, the prices fell. A lot. 30% down and stayed there.

The 48GX was going for much more after it was canceled, but the only replacement was the 49G. Even the G+ didn't do much. But the 50G did. Now you can get a 48GX for $120 easily. They were $250.

Now we have a big recession. Potentially dodgy old calculators are going to tank. NIB perfectimundos may hold value, but the old workhorses won't.

Considering the time value of money, and use and wear, and calculators really aren't a good investment--and now there is going to be a down trend.

Edited: 2 Apr 2009, 9:07 p.m.


#6

Actually, I'm already seeing a significant drop in the prices of all vintage calculators when compared to the last few years. As you said, excepting the mint NIB complete items and perhaps some exceptionally rare models (HP-41C/CV/CX are common as dirt), prices are consistently lower. I managed to buy an HP-46 for $255 and an HP-91 for $215, both in perfect working condition and very good cosmetically, which is much lower than I had seen previously. On the flip side, I only got $176 when I sold one of my HP-65's, which was also fully functional and very good cosmetically. Whether this is due to the current economic situation or simply a lot of old engineers dying and their widows selling their old calcs I don't know. What is clear to me is that it is a buyer's market right now, and likely to remain so for a while at least.

Michael

Edited: 3 Apr 2009, 10:58 a.m. after one or more responses were posted


#7

Quote:
seeing a significant drop in the prices of all vintage calculators when compared to the last few years.

Greetings.. do you have any Empirical Data to support this hypothesis? I suggest the quoted claim and Bill's suggestion that it is a "buyers market" are both Recency Effects.

There are a number of holes in the "buyer's market", "collector=bad-investment" theory, namely (based on my experience):

  1. One of the main markets for the 48gx is surveying, and alot has happened there in the last few years other than the 50g, so while I agree that the prices of 48gx have fallen, I do not believe it's causal.
  2. While I agree in general about the comment RE time value of money, the argument posted does not take into account purchase price, date purchased, time held, inflation, and the like. So it is not logical to say "because of TVM" all calculators are bad investments. QED
  3. Related to previous comment, the price of any globally-traded commodity in dollars is not a true reflection of the health of it. Calculator exchange sites like ebay are also global exchanges, and the variation in the currency markets have not been taken into account in the recent comparison of $USD prices. One must also consider the relative strength of trading currencies, esp YEN, AUD, EUR, and GBP.
  4. The reason I suggest a "recency effect" of the summarily falling prices may be a standard seasonal dip following the December Sale season. I note a similar trend in previous years of data I have collected.
  5. Lastly, No (or very little) consideration has been given to Price elasticity of Demand for the vintage (non-survey) models. Even with very specific data on thousands of calculator purchases, price, shipping, country, etc.. I have only a superficial understanding of all of the factors effect calculator prices on any given day.

Edited: 2 Apr 2009, 11:57 p.m.


#8

Quote:
Greetings.. do you have any Empirical Data to support this hypothesis? I suggest the quoted claim and Bill's suggestion that it is a "buyers market" are both Recency Effects.

There are a number of holes in the "buyer's market", "collector=bad-investment" theory, namely (based on my experience):

  1. One of the main markets for the 48gx is surveying, and alot has happened there in the last few years other than the 50g, so while I agree that the prices of 48gx have fallen, I do not believe it's causal.
  2. While I agree in general about the comment RE time value of money, the argument posted does not take into account purchase price, date purchased, time held, inflation, and the like. So it is not logical to say "because of TVM" all calculators are bad investments. QED
  3. Related to previous comment, the price of any globally-traded commodity in dollars is not a true reflection of the health of it. Calculator exchange sites like ebay are also global exchanges, and the variation in the currency markets have not been taken into account in the recent comparison of $USD prices. One must also consider the relative strength of trading currencies, esp YEN, AUD, EUR, and GBP.
  4. The reason I suggest a "recency effect" of the summarily falling prices may be a standard seasonal dip following the December Sale season. I note a similar trend in previous years of data I have collected.
  5. Lastly, No (or very little) consideration has been given to Price elasticity of Demand for the vintage (non-survey) models. Even with very specific data on thousands of calculator purchases, price, shipping, country, etc.. I have only a superficial understanding of all of the factors effect calculator prices on any given day.

The market for used HP calcs is so small, and mainly through only one channel (eBay), that it is possible a sole individual can have a major influence on any perceived "market trend". Good luck to anyone trying to track that.

Even better luck to anyone who is in it just as an investment. I suspect vintage calculators will almost certainly become a poorer investment the longer you hold on to them. As vintage HP and other calculators are really only of a perceived value to those who have a nostalgic value attached to them. And these people will slowly disappear with time.

So good luck to anyone planning on leaving the collection to the kids in say 30 years time...

Dave.


#9

Quote:
So good luck to anyone planning on leaving the collection to the kids in say 30 years time...

I want to take my collection with me in the afterlife....sort of like a pharaoh's burial.

#10

Or in other words, we have both seen the same thing: the relative non-trending of many models. They go up, they go down, there is a run for a few weeks, then a retrenchment. Since 2000 at least, the 11c has been remarkably stable long term--maybe a slight upward. I remember finding them averaging $80 or so back in $2000, now they are maybe $120 (and condition of calculator varies). For 9 years on, with a lot of unreported inflation, that isn't a real rise in price.

I see the seasonal effects you speak of, too.

BTW you can trust wikipedia as far as you can throw it.

#11

If it is the recession that is going to do in collectible calculator prices, it better happen real soon! It appears we have passed the panic stage, market lows have been recorded, and the press is becoming guardedly optimistic.

If it is something else, then I still remain unconvinced. HP-32SII prices seem to be rising nicely at this time (your reasoning does not explain that). Even though the topic was HP-41 prices, you did not provide any reasoning supporting that its prices would fall in the next six months. The big difference between the HP-48 story and the HP-41 story is that if you know the HP-48GX, the learning curve for the HP-50G is very quickly travelled. There is a natural upgrade tendency. Is there a book written "HP-48GX to HP-50G Transitions"? The HP-41C is quite a different machine, no user who loves that one would ever be satisfied with only an HP-50G.

But, perhaps you have knowledge of the HP-41CG? As an HP-50G is to an HP-48G, and HP-41CG would be to an HP-41C? If such a beast will be released in the next six months, then perhaps you are correct. It might be the HP-41C killer! Please share more details!

But, wait, now I see it, in a slightly later post! What you really mean is "Don't buy any HP-41CX at all, now or in the future, it is just junk." Your opinion, I certainly won't try to disuade you. But it makes reasonable the conclusion that you are not recommending an HP-41 to the original poster.

And where did the initial poster indicate he would buy an HP-41C for an investment? That did not seem to be either his purpose, or his expectation.

Dan


#12

"market lows have been recorded, and the press is becoming guardedly optimistic"

Hahaha, HAHAHA, HAHAHAHA!

It is only the beginning. We are in the false bottom.

The press is guardedly optimistic to support the Obamanation.

Edited: 2 Apr 2009, 10:46 p.m.


#13

If anyone actually knows how to predict the market, we should be able to identify them by the fact that they are filthy rich, not by them writing articles in economic columns that happen to turn out to be correct -- right?

What little respect I ever had for economic analysts in the media went down the drain when the price of oil collapsed while the US dollar did not. Who saw *that* coming?

I doubt that the press is "guardedly optimistic" in order to support the "Obamanation". The press has *always* been optimistic, guardedly or otherwise, for at least the last 20 years or so, or as long as I have been paying attention (i.e. since the late 1970s)... Good news sells better than bad.

ObHP: maybe I should start looking for a nice 41CX, or even a working HP-27 (Woodstock, not 27S!). The news is so gloomy lately, if it is accurate maybe I should just jump off a cliff, and if it isn't, this *must* be the time to buy. :-)


#14

Warren Buffett.


#15

Hmm. Buffett. Smart or just lucky? He didn't catch on to the huge rise of the euro against the dollar until it was mostly over, and that makes me wonder.


#16

It makes sense. Buffett's whole disciplined approach is to look for underlying value--to calculate the true value of the company--and to only buy when an entity is undervalued by that metric. In the case of the Euro-Dollar fluctuations, there was nothing there--just monetary policy + trade deficit + carry trade = gambling.

An example of his value idea was a huge investment in silver back in 2002 or 2003. He bought a bunch of it. At the time, silver was trading at less than its production cost. He figured that couldn't last!

#17

Bill,

A couple of differences in our posts I've noted:

You removed the "it appears" when you pulled the quote from my post. I qualified my assessment. And I continue to stand by my assessment, qualification included.

You make your statements of the future out to be absolute fact. My observations are those that claim to know the future beyond any doubt, don't. And secondarily, maniacal laughter generally gives away a ?_______?

Only the future will tell what will happen. Shall we make an appointment on this board in a year to see who turns out to be the most correct?

Dan


#18

Hi-hi on the maniacal laughter! :-)

"It appears" appeared to be attached to the "panic" not to the "market lows"--that's how I read you. Panic is not quantitative so I didn't want to quote it.

What goes up, must come down is how I see it. And real estate hasn't actually come down yet, so I see a lot more unwinding yet to come. (Florida and Nevada real estate have come down, but not the rest of it. In the north east you are still seeing housing at 6 times yearly earnings rather than 3 to 4 times. That has to come down as it is not sustainable). The more the congress spends our tax money to "stimulate" us, the more we will fall into a longer deeper hole and as that is where we are going (stimulus--even money for new cars!) I don't see any way to justify the idea that we will *not* slide a lot deeper in the next 6 months....and calculators will feel it, too.

Edited: 3 Apr 2009, 10:36 a.m.

#19

All calculator "collectors" are investors--just bad ones;-)

There is already a "50CG". Just go get Hrastprogrammer's emulator. It is fantastic. I use it on my 48GX when I want to use a legacy keystroke program.

#20

Nigel,

I bought my first HP-41CV in August of 1983, and it has been my primary calculator since then. I've tried others, but always come back to my HP-41CX. I own an HP-28S, HP-42S, HP-48SX, HP-48GX, HP-49G, HP-50G, HP-32SII, HP-33S, HP-35S (2), HP-30S (yuck!) HP-10S, and even an HP-12C. I know the newer ones blow the HP-41 away in speed and built in capability. The main reasons I (and likely others) stay with the HP-41 are two; We KNOW the machine (it takes an investment to know any complex machine). And, it was so well architected, designed, and for the most part, built (there ARE a few weak points in its build design).

If I were you, I'd jump at the opportunity to pick up the cheap "starter HP-41". Do it in the spirit of a chasing after your first love. Throw all care to the winds!

"Tis better to have loved and lost, than to never have loved before."

Dan


#21

Quote:

there ARE a few weak points in its build design


Screw posts.

Zebra strips.

Battery corrosion gone inside.

I've been disappointed once with a 41cv and I won't make that mistake again! (for $50 [2004] with complete box and manuals I suppose it really isn't a burn though!).

Compared to a Voyager, the 41C is cheap brittle junk.

Edited: 2 Apr 2009, 9:13 p.m.

#22

Buy it! I bought an HP41CV several months ago for less than £30, missing one module cover and the battery pack. It's still missing the module cover, but I've built a reasonably robust battery holder out of metal strips, foam, black-painted cardboard, and insulating tape. I now have both a fully-functioning HP41CV and the satisfaction of having "restored" it! So long as the battery contacts are in good condition you should have no trouble doing something similar. It will look great in your shirt pocket and the keys feel absolutely wonderful - I've never felt better keys on any calculator.

Nigel (another one)

#23

I'd definitely buy it at that price, especially because it's in working condition. Since all you're doing is playing around with it and portability is not important, I would not worry about it being tethered to an external battery pack. Besides, you can use the money you saved to buy a proper battery holder and 4 N-cells. I have several old non-HP calcs that I connect directly to my variable DC power supply when I want to play with them.

Michael


#24

Quote:
I have several old non-HP calcs that I connect directly to my variable DC power supply

That's how I killed an original TI-30, many years ago, when its disposable 9V cell got low, and I had no spare. (I'd long since given up on the crummy rechargeable pack provided.) Maybe I did it wrong...

-- KS


#25

If you use a properly regulated adjustable DC power supply, correct voltage and polarity, connected to the proper points, you can't hurt any piece of electronic equipment. There must have been something wrong with it or there was an inadvertent short in the circuit. When I hook something up for the first time I gradually increase the voltage while monitoring the current draw. If the current is excessive (usually it should be less than 200 mA even with all LED's lit up), then I shut off power until I can figure out what is wrong.

Edited: 2 Apr 2009, 11:18 p.m.

#26

Quote:
I have got the chance to buy a reclaimed CV , no modules or battery but which is powered by an external battery pack or a USB cable link to a PC. Cost only £ 28.00. Is it worth this?

I'd buy it in a hot second!



Actually, I probably wouldn't now, since I have lots of 41Cs - they are my absolute favorite HP calculator. I'm an enthusiast first and a collector second. So the raised-from-the-dead 41 would interest me if I had no 41 to play with.



As to market bottoms, the short term dynamics of the collectible calculator market or politics, I have no opinions I'd like to share here. But I do observe that the supply of 41C machines is finite, and that it is inevitably shrinking with time. So over the long term, they are probably a good investment. Unless you purchased one new, back in the 80s, when the prices in real terms were 4-5 times what they are today. But in that case, you presumably would have taken out the value in use over time.


Regards,
Howard



Edited to add this postscript: If that USB cable turns out to do more than just provide power, please let us know. :)


Edited: 2 Apr 2009, 11:15 p.m.

#27

Nigel, BUY IT and play with it.

Collectors and users should not be in this for the investment. Collectables and their styles come in go in cycles.

Right now for me, the HP classics are there for nostalgic reasons. In some cases they are still being used as I tend to be lazy programmers and I have all the routines in RPN due to the era I went to university

My HP 41CX is my powerhorse only because I know how to maintain it, fix it and bring it into the 21st century thanks to the efforts of Diego and others. I have fixed the posts, screw heads, replaced the foam in the zebra fitting and changed displays for it. The keys work and there was never battery discharge as I take care of my electronics. I also have a spare 41CX.

I also have many proprietary programs that will not convert to the HP42S as they depend on dynamic time functions. I also have HPIL accessories which still function to make the 41C adaptable to work and play but will not function with the HP48, 49 and 50 series

Having said the above, programming and calculator restoration is a hobby, not an investment. Sure if, and when I am selling them I hope to recoup some of the cost but will not be disappointed if I do not. I would however like them to go to a nice appreciated home!


These have all been been restored and are as new. The fun is in the restoration for me, and for use at work, albeit, not required for work. There are more as projects for rainy days and they to will be restored to as new. As any one at the last HPCC will know, I do this for fun and not profit! Now, do you need a watch (wink, wink, nudge, nudge!!!!)


This picture lets you see the Nixie clock I built from a kit from EBAY:



#28

I seem to have stirred up some kind of debate , which is always fun :-) . It even had a touch of a political 'swipe' in there (not a view shared by me but he is not my president so what do I care !). Dan's quote was hilarious but it sort of sums it up nicely!

Thanks for all the comments which are clearly meant to helpful, so I will share a few back and maybe an additional question or two.

Just for clarity, I understand the PCB connecting the modules to the main PCB on this reclaimed machine is perished through battery corrosion , so I assume there is no chance of connecting modules in the future - unless you guys know differently ?

It seems to me that £28 vs £170 to get a chance just to play around on a real model is probably a no brainer.

I realise of course that I am potentially going down a dangerous road here. Once I start collecting , where will it end.

The funny thing is that I only came into this situation via the I41cx+. Prior to that I had this Commodore programmable calculator that sat in my desk drawer seeing the light of day every few years. I also bought a Casio programmable and graphing calculator much more recently but it somehow didn't hold my attention.

I had never come across RPN or a Stack before and now I have developed this strange fascination for it.

At the moment the Voyagers hold no appeal to me (probably this is because my love or memories of calculators goes back to their plasticy feel), but that may change over time. It is also the expandibility of the 41 series and its basic but raw power and the ability to program and hack it that grabs my attention.

But I am in this for fun not making money. On the other hand I don't want to be Mr. Gullible when buying. I am in the UK. Is Ebay the best place from where to buy ? Also I am getting the message that the HP41 models are fairly ubiquitous. Is £170 too much to pay for one ?

Thanks for hearing me out.

Nigel


#29

Nigel,

I too am a collector of things that I find interesting. I have never collected anything with the idea of making a monetary profit. Most of my calculator collection has come after I retired from my job for 35 years as an engineer, where I used calculators as tools, nothing more. I recently bought two HP-41CV's (one half-nut and one full-nut), simply to play around with and stimulate my aging brain to avert senility. I also enjoy the challenge of fixing things, and old vintage calculators provide this opportunity. I don't worry about whether the price is reasonable; if I want it and can afford it, then I buy it. I might sell something that is redundant (I currently have accumulated 7 HP-45's) or that I acquired in a lot and can't use (memory module that works only in an HP-41C), but I don't expect to make a profit, and the proceeds are quickly consumed by another purchase. So, is there a risk of overpaying? Sure. But, how can you place a value on something like this, which from a purely practical standpoint is obsolete?

#30

Nigel, you've got some very good questions, I'll try to do them as must justice as I can.

The HP-41 "PCB" you reference is not really a PCB. It is a flexible copper/plastic connector wrapped around a plastic block, that delivers power from the batteries to the main circuit boards, display logic, and I/O ports. And it also connects the I/O ports to the main circuit boards, through a set of contacts that are made through pressure. If the battery corrosion made its way far enough along this connector, then it would easily interfere not only with the main logic connection to the I/O ports, but also with power delivery to the rest of the calculator, due to corrosion at the pressure contact with the rest of the system. Bottom line is, if the corrosion heads 'south' out of view, then there is a chance that some or all of the I/O ports won't function.

Generally, non-working battery corroded HP-41CVs and CXs will go for $40-$50 ballpark pricing, on ebay. Therefre I would say that 28 pounds would be a fair price for a battery corroded, modified, but working unit.

By the way, it is possible, with the correct part, periodically supplied by a third party HP-41 guru, to fix the problem that you describe. His name is Diego, he posts here often, and is truly a scholar and a gentleman.

Where will it end? Well, we all know that all endeavors undertaken by men end up only one place. But, as has been eloquently stated before, it is the journey, not the destination. I very strongly suspect, based on what you have posted here, that you will catch the bug, and thoroughly enjoy your time with all things HP-41C. There are few things I would rather do than sit down with a new HP-41C manual or book, and read about some new piece of gear that I just aquired, or learn something new about the HP-41 internals. Check out the "Memories" section of this site. About 10 years ago, I wrote about my early experiences with the HP-41.

Concerning the other calculators that you mentioned; compare the huge investment people have made in HP-41 web related content with any of those others. That is an indication of how strong the HP-41 'bug bite' can be.

Ebay is good, and ebay is not so good. It is a convenient way to find new HP-41 stuff and have an opportunity to purchase it. Better deals can be had elsewhere, but the effort required to find them is at least an order of magnitude higher. But, ebay deals generally come at a high price. And sometimes there are nasty surprises, although in my experience, if one is willing to put forth the effort both before and after the sale, they will come out eventually satisfied. Ebay and Paypal know that buyers have to continue to trust the market they have built, or their business dies. I have had to file a few PayPal complaints on calculators, but have always received satisfaction.

Concerning your last question; Since you are in this for fun, and messing around with stuff that does not work quite right can be really fun, initially stay away from the prime units on ebay, the ones that would go for 170 pounds. Start with the ones that need some help, like battery corrosion that can be repaired. I have fixed up a few of these types, aquired for around $50, and they make useful work tools to carry abound in my laptop bag. After that, if you want a complete set in excellent condition from ebay, then yes, you'll spend 170 pounds (or more) buying one, but you'll have a much better idea of what you are doing.

Happy collecting! Long live the HP-41!

Dan


#31

Quote:
But, ebay deals generally come at a high price.

Yes, absolutely, but I've found that the judicious application of certain rules in online auctioneering can minimize the chances of being really taken to the cleaners.

1) Never pay a "Buy It Now" price and never bid on "Reserve" auctions.

2) Ask the seller questions, even if you don't need to, just to see if you will get a reply and if it is not evasive. I will never bid on an item if I do not receive a satisfactory reply.

3) Understand the risks you are taking with an untested item. An untested Woodstock or Spice is far more likely to be broken and unfixable than a Classic.

4) Avoid auctions by "Power Sellers" with very long discourses on legalities and very little tangible information on the item itself.

5) Don't get into bidding wars with ignorant newbie zero-feedback bidders, who will push the price up to astronomical levels. Decide in advance on what you are willing to pay, and stick with it. It's 100% certainty that this will *not* be the last time this item will come up in auction. Learn to be patient and deliberate in your quest.

Michael


#32

Michael,

That is very good advice on ebay auctions. May I add to it?

Quote:
1) Never pay a "Buy It Now" price and never bid on "Reserve" auctions.
The concept of an auction is that you pay a small increment more than what the next higher bidder is willing to pay. "Buy It Now" many times should be more aptly named "Suckers - Buy Here", and Reserve Price Auctions have always been mis-handled by ebay in that you are bidding against the seller in addition to other bidders. It is the manner in which ebay lets you shill your own auction.

Quote:
3) Understand the risks you are taking with an untested item. An untested Woodstock or Spice is far more likely to be broken and unfixable than a Classic.
I go further. Beware the 'untested item'. When I see that, I carefully examine the seller's on-line information; current sales, past items for sale, feedback, to see what they have sold and bought before. Too often unfortunately, unethical sellers think that if they know an item is broken, that it is really OK simply to say 'untested.' Like the 25 year old 'untested' HP-41 Card Reader, being sold by a well-known purveyor of HP items for very high prices, who sells 'tested and working' units on occasion. Give me a break, do we all look that stupid? Well, I guess from such sellers perspective, they only need one.

Quote:
4) Avoid auctions by "Power Sellers" with very long discourses on legalities and very little tangible information on the item itself.
The legalities can be annoying, but I really am suspicious of sellers that copy reams of information on the item from well-known information sources, and say little, if anything about the item they are selling. I've seen feedback from buyers who received items that were not working, and this was never mentioned in the title or description.

Quote:
5) Don't get into bidding wars with ignorant newbie zero-feedback bidders, who will push the price up to astronomical levels. Decide in advance on what you are willing to pay, and stick with it. It's 100% certainty that this will *not* be the last time this item will come up in auction. Learn to be patient and deliberate in your quest.
I'd recommend not getting into bidding wars period, no matter who you may be bidding against. Research recent sales, carefully examine all available information and photos on that specific item and on the sellers past sales and feedback, and then pick the price you would not be kicking yourself for if you win. Bid once, and be done with it. Once competitive emotions take hold in a bidding war, you might as well be throwing your money out your window.

Dan


#33

Dan,

Thanks for your added comments. Certainly, your advice on researching sellers is very useful. Caveat emptor!

Regarding "underderstand the risks", I was thinking more along the lines of assessing the likelihood that a genuinely untested item might be defective, despite showing no outward signs such as corrosion on battery contacts. Whereas a Classic series calc cannot be harmed by being operated off the AC adapter with the battery removed (excluding the card reader models), a Woodstock or Spice series calc can and probably will be. Therefore, even if a Woodstock or Spice looks outwardly very clean, it's not possible to determine if it may have been ruined unless its life history is known. For example, I bought an HP-45 from a seller that normally sells miscellaneous antiques and curios, knew nothing about calculators and was missing the AC adapter, so it could not be tested. The calculator looked immaculate. I asked for and received a close-up photo of the battery compartment, which showed no evidence of corrosion, so I felt it was a reasonable risk and bought it. It turned out to be perfect, and had clearly seen very little use. It was clear to me in this instance that the seller was not being coy or deceitful, when she stated that it was untested. I am well aware of some of the weasels out there who mince words when it comes to the condition of items, and never even bother to bid on their auctions.

Michael


#34

Weasel example:

(See here)

He suggests it might just be the battery, but tries to cover himself by posing this as a question. So, he could not have tried a different battery pack? C'mon! Small print says No Returns, so the buyer is stuck with a $389 piece of unrepairable junk. And I wonder where he got the CD copy of the manual? Does MoHPC have a copyright?

Michael


#35

This moron has been the subject of much discussion on this forum. He sells junk at super-inflated prices hoping someone even less intelligent than he (if that's possible) will buy it. He's been trying to sell the same HP-65 for over a year now, I think. He doesn't deserve our attention.


#36

I suggest that he does deserve some attention. Not all attention is positive. I think he fully deserves all the negative attention he gets. Speaking of which, when I examined his 'buyer's' feedback, it appears he has a health problem he is diligently trying to solve? (Question mark intentional)

Dan


#37

Quote:
...he has a health problem he is diligently trying to solve..

No need to "raise" the issue here :-). I can't see where saving a few dollars on that particular health purchase is worth buying in such a public venue. (yes, I saw that a few weeks ago and laughed by head off...)

ebay id disclosure: hudendai

#38

Hello!

Quote:
This picture lets you see the Nixie clock I built from a kit from EBAY

Mine is still unassembled because I can't decide which nixie tubes to use (I have three complete sets now ... maybe I have to build three clocks?).

Regarding the original question: I would wait for a complete, pocketable 41 with its own battery! With a little patience, you can find a good one for less than 50 Euros/Dollars/Pounds. Over the years, I bought five or six and never paid more than that, some came with accessories!

But as much as I try, I simply don't like the '41. I only like things that glow in the dark :-)

Greetings, Max


Edited: 3 Apr 2009, 7:51 a.m.


#39

Am I the only long time reader in this forum who miss, on posts like the Maximilian one, "reeed leeeeds" Norman?


#40

Yeah - I miss Norm (occasionally known as Captain Zener, too) and his passion for red lights.

#41

RED LED'ssssssssssssss!

Hail to Captain Zener, wherever he may be.

#42

Very impressive collection, Geoff

But...do I not see a 19C in there?

Hal :)


#43

Hello Hal (got a spare, cheap?) ;-)

Your correct, no 19C YET.

As described earlier, maybe the price will come down. Got the partner there, the 29C and it actually gets used when I want RED GLOWING DISPLAYS in the cockpit!

The 41CX, 42s, 15c, 67, and lately the 48GX and 35s have made it to the office!

Also just added a restored 48SX and a 41CV. The 48SX I posted below and the CV needs a little cosmetic work.

The 41C, CV, CX will come with me to HPCC in Vancouver this fall. We will be setting up a large HPIL 41C working display. It will include printers, plotters, tape drives, floppy drives, laser wands and any other HPIL we can get a hold of.

Cheers, Geoff

Edited: 3 Apr 2009, 12:32 p.m.


#44

Just last week I picked up a HP-19C in perfect working and excellent cosmetic condition for under $200. I don't know if you would consider that a reasonable price, but from what I've seen in the past it seems pretty good.

Is the bottom middle calc an HP-10, and the bottom right an HP-91 or HP-92?

Michael


#45

IMHO the bottom center calc looks like a HP20b, and the bottom right is a HP91.


#46

Very good Walter. The middle calculator clearly has the wrong keyboard arrangement to be a HP-10 and the right calculator lacks the second blue shift key, so it cannot be an HP-92.


#47

Walter is right,

The 20B was lasts years HP gift for attending the HPCC 2009.

The 91 is an interesting story. It arrived in pieces in a box with a printer assembly still shrink wrapped. I had no idea if all the parts were there or not.

Well the new printer assembly had a carbon composite gearing system which precluded the need to repair the old gummy gear. I now have both printers systems working having repaired the gummy wheel on the original.

The only thing missing is the dust cover over the printer roll. Not bad for $25 USd.

Cheers, Geoff

PS:

top row     35, 45, 55, 65, 67
2nd row 41C, 41CV, 41CX (cv was out for a spa),48G, 48G+, 48GX
3rd row 25C, 29C, 2 classic external battery charges, one
topcat external battery charger, 41 card reader
32E, 34C, 32SII, 42S
4th row 10C, 11C, 15C, 16C, 12C platinum, 71B metal back, 71B
newer plastic back
5th row 97, 20B, 91

Since that photo I have added the 48SX posted below, a HP 28S and a new 35S.

Cheers, Geoff

Edited: 3 Apr 2009, 10:39 p.m.


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