Disappointed



#2

Jó napot everyone...

I received my HP-35s today, and I hate to admit this, but I am disappointed.

Yes, this a much better calculator than HP has made in some time, but it doesn't feel the same. I thought it would feel more solid, have a little more weight to it, would be made in the USA, and where is the S/n on it? All in all, it is very nice, considering what they have been producing, but HP can do much better than this. I hate to say this, but it feels cheap.

I don't know, just my thoughts.

Vincze


#3

Well, it *is* cheap! :-)


#4

I know, I should not be so critical.

One funny trick I have already found out is if (with the unit off) press yellow shift and OFF, it will turn calculator ON. If you then press blue shift and ON, it will turn calculator off. And lastly, if you just press C (clear button), it will turn it on, if it was off. I can see batteries advancing dead real fast.


#5

Please let me know what other calculator does not have an ON button? It has been a universal design (TI, HP, Sharp and Casio employ them) since slide switches went out...

#6

Pressing Left-Shift and then C turns the machine on and off. You get the same effect with the right-shift and the C buttons!!!

How interesting!

Namir

#7

With the machine off, [left shift] doesn't do anything. Pressing [left shift]+[OFF} is really just [ON].

I did notice that either shift key followed by [OFF/C/ON] turns the machine off. I didn't see that in the manual.

Fred

#8

A little history is in order here.

It is the labelling that is confusing you; the functionality is perfectly legitimate.

The 32sii has exactly the same functionality of the lower left hand corner key (the on/c key).

1. If the machine is off, the On/C turns the unit on.
2. If the machine is on, pressing either shift key, followed by the On/C, turns the unit off.
3. With the unit off, pressing any key before the On/C has no effect.
4. With the unit on, On/C functions as either Cancel (or exit with save) or Clear depending on context.

Even on the 32sii, the yellowshift-On to turn off was undocumented. It was just one of those enjoyable little insider features:-)

Edited: 27 July 2007, 8:19 a.m.


#9

Thank you for clarification Bill. I guess it strange to me that On may also mean off. I always thought On is On and Off mean Off, but now I have to think a little different which OK.

Also, please excuse my poor english. I from Hungary, and come to America a few years back and still trying learn english better.


#10

Note that all the Voyagers (10c,11c,12c,15c,16c) have an "On" button but no "off" printed anywhere. The most common thing I hear from people whom I have allowed to use my 11c, 15c, 12c etc is, "where's the off button" and "how do I clear it".

Then after fumbling for a while they finally say, "it doesn't work right." (which is the RPN aspect).


#11

Ha.. I remember when I first come to USA, and I had never owned calculator before. I had used one before, so I had some understanding on how you use. I found a 16C at garage sale and bought for $10. It not have book and not have battery, so I didn't know if it worked or not. I found battery for it and I remember how mad I was when I entered simple math problem and answer was not what I had expected. Luckily for me, a friend of mine was familiar with RPN and he show me how to use. I remember thinking that americans do math funny, and 2+2 does not = 4 in america. Im glad i was just misunderstanding how to use the calculator. Now I have 16C, 45, and now 35s. 45 is my favorite as 16c seem slow, and 35s I still get used to.

Jó nap

#12

Vincze…

No need to apologize for your english skills. It's a tough language and you have made yourself very understandable.

I was born in the USA nearly 49 years ago and I'm still trying to improve my english skills. Perhaps it's a curse being an engineer.

Fred

#13

Quote:
have a little more weight

More weight would just be more expense, and wouldn't necessarily make it any "better". Some people like their calculators to be light. The important thing is whether it is rugged. The 35s seems OK in that regard; I'm not sure how it will compare in drop tests to a 1980s-vintage 41C, 12C, or the like.

Quote:
would be made in the USA

Expecting it to be made in USA is absurd. Very little consumer electronics is made in USA now. Making it in the USA would make it more expensive but not necessarily better in any measurable way. Where it is made doesn't matter to me in the least; I only care about the build quality. The 35s build quality seems to be fine, at least for the two I've purchased.

Quote:
and where is the S/n on it

A sticker on the back. Does yours not have one?

It's not obvious to me why you would care whether it has a S/N
label. The S/N is generally only useful to the manufacturer for tracking units for warranty and repair purposes, and calculators haven't actually been repaired for almost two decades now.

If you want something that uniquely identifies your 35s in case it is misplaced or stolen, engrave your name and contact information on the back. That's far more useful to you than the serial number.

Quote:
I hate to say this, but it feels cheap.

I disagree. It feels fine. Better than I expected, actually. If Corvallis Division had introduced this in the 1990s, I wouldn't have thought there was anything seriously wrong with it. That's not to say that I have no criticism of it, but I didn't think Corvallis Division products were perfect either. There's always some room for improvement.

The 35s does have a different feel than the Pioneer series, but then the Pioneers had a different feel from the Voyagers, which had a different feel from the Spice series.


#14

I like mine just fine. Like my old 33E in the keyboard department rather than my 41C in look and feel. Decimal point is better in the visibility department over the 33S and the readability of the key functions is fantastic over the 33S!

My only gripe is the sigma key should switch places with the R/S key in my opinion. But they don't have me on the payroll. ;)

Nothing a deal breaker.

The light weight means it's less apt to fall out of my shirt pocket if I bend over.

#15

I am not disappointed at all. The HP-35s is a great calculator. It has the timeless classic HP look. It light, yet solid. It is a true shirt pocket calculator. The keys feel perfect and have worked perfectly for me. It has limitations, but for $60 its a great calculator.

I am looking forward to a similarly designed upgrade to the HP-50g.
I would like to see it USB rechargable, USB 2.0 High Speed support, color display for graphics, SDHC (SD card High Capacity) support, sound support, keyboard overlay support, JTAG debugging support for its ARM9 CPU, real-time clock, and other features. I would like to be able to use it for lab equipment control, vehicle communications (using the USB as an interface to a vehicle communication device). I would like to be able to use it for a basis of an embedded system.

But back to the topic, the HP-35s is a great calculator for the money and definitely not a disappointment, but a delight.


#16

Quote:

I am looking forward to a similarly designed upgrade to the HP-50g.
I would like to see it USB rechargable, USB 2.0 High Speed support, color display for graphics, SDHC (SD card High Capacity) support, sound support, keyboard overlay support, JTAG debugging support for its ARM9 CPU, real-time clock, and other features. I would like to be able to use it for lab equipment control, vehicle communications (using the USB as an interface to a vehicle communication device). I would like to be able to use it for a basis of an embedded system.


Sound like you want PocketPC to me.

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