Comparing data sheets - 33s and 35s



#8

Comparing the 33s data sheet with the prematurely released (and maybe not even right) 35s data sheet shows that these calculators are very close siblings:

1. The processor (SPLB31A), memory (31k), and batteries (2 x CR2032) are the same. The display is the basically the same (2 lines x 14 char) but it may have some annunciator differences.

2. The 33s has 48 keys while the 35s has 43.

3. The firmware is obviously different because the 35s has 800+ registers vs 27, imaginary numbers are handled differently, and the 35s has 42 constants while the 33s has 40.

The 35s data sheet also says it is the only scientific calculator available that can do algebraic and RPN entry. This implies the 33s will be taken off the market.

My only gripe with the 33s has been the keyboard form and cluttered layout, so I am very happy to see a revised version that actually looks and hopefully feels like a traditional HP calculator. I'll probably buy three. One for the office, one for home, and one that will remain unopened until one of the other two fails after 2027. If I only bought three HP-11c's in 1987 for the same purpose ...


#9

Quote:
If I only bought three HP-11c's in 1987 for the same purpose ...

In 1983 I bought one HP-15C for myself and one HP-11C for one of my brothers. Both still work nicely. If I had bought another 15C as a spare, it would be still in its package. But who would have thought of this back then? Firstly, they were supposed to last a lifetime; secondly, they were too pricey!

The HP-11C appears to be particularly appreciated by some scientists, as we can see here:

http://muller.lbl.gov/pages/nemch1.htm

Scroll down the page and take a look at the second to last paragraph. Will there ever be a touching mention of the HP-35S in a scientific paper? :-)


#10

Quote:
http://muller.lbl.gov/pages/nemch1.htm

Scroll down the page and take a look at the second to last paragraph. Will there ever be a touching mention of the HP-35S in a scientific paper? :-)


"Nemesis the Death Star" by Richard Muller is an excellent read, I'd highly recommend it. Anyone remotely into science will enjoy it.

Dave.


#11

Quote:
Anyone remotely into science will enjoy it.

I think this comprises almost everyone here. The excerpt in the previous link appears in the book The World Treasury of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics (ISBN 0-316-28129-8), pages 261-267. The missing mass extinction chart can be found here:

http://muller.lbl.gov/pages/lbl-nem.htm

Gerson.


#12

Quote:


I think this comprises almost everyone here. The excerpt in the previous link appears in the book The World Treasury of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics (ISBN 0-316-28129-8), pages 261-267. The missing mass extinction chart can be found here:
http://muller.lbl.gov/pages/lbl-nem.htm
Gerson.


And of course it is the first chapter in the Nemesis book. The rest of the book in the same style, and it really gives a great insight into how scientists go about investigating and coming up with major discoveries like this.

ISBN for the copy of Nemesis I have is 0-343-48161-0 but it seems to go under many others.

Dave.

#13

Quote:


I think this comprises almost everyone here. The excerpt in the previous link appears in the book The World Treasury of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics (ISBN 0-316-28129-8), pages 261-267. The missing mass extinction chart can be found here:

http://muller.lbl.gov/pages/lbl-nem.htm

Gerson.


Awesome book: all the greatest hits are there in one volume. Try How a Supernova Explodes by Hans Bethe and Gerald Brown -- it's a mind-blower.

Yeah, we're all dorks. That's why we get the chicks.


#14

Quote:
Awesome book: all the greatest hits are there in one volume. Try How a Supernova Explodes by Hans Bethe and Gerald Brown -- it's a mind-blower.

Indeed! I got mine from BOMC some years ago but so far I have read only a few articles, including the one you recommend. For those of you interested, the complete table of contents and another excerpt can be found here:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0316281336/ref=sib_dp_pop_toc/102-6071978-0724915?ie=UTF8&p=S006#reader-link


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