HP 35c "Classic" Red Dot Anniversary Edition



#21

The HP 35c "Classic" Red Dot Anniversary Edition - possible design. This is probably what most of us expected. With this feature set it would be priced below that of the HP-9s so everyone would be able to afford to buy one:-


HP 35c Classic Red Dot Anniversary Edition


Cheers
Jason


#22

Very nice. I'd like the dimensions to be very small. History in your pocket (or on your key chain).

#23

But it really should have the x^y key for inverse log...

#24

Nice one.

But the design of the keys does not reflect the design of the original HP-35,

as the original HP-35 did _not_ have slanted keys,

and so the surface could be flat, and the imprints full-sized.

However, as I see the photos of the modified 35s again,

I still don't like the arrangement of the modified cursor keys.

If I had to choose between these and the 'original' cursor key

arrangement and form factor as hp indicated,

I'd choose the hp 'diamond shape' version,

since the arrangement is much more natural (like a cursor cross) .

Raymond


#25

Raymond,

Quote:
as I see the photos of the modified 35s again,
I still don't like the arrangement of the modified cursor keys.
If I had to choose between these and the 'original' cursor key
arrangement and form factor as hp indicated,
I'd choose the hp 'diamond shape' version,
since the arrangement is much more natural (like a cursor cross) .

You should vote for it in the respective thread.
#26

Nice, but calculators and their features have progressed somewhat since the original 35S.

A few extra features would not only make it look better (i.e. more "technical") but make it a much more valuable calc for everyday use. I know the point is to make it look like the original, but give me at least some progress over nostalgia any day.

Dave.

#27

I really like this idea. The HP-35 Anniversary Edition should be non-programmable, traditional design and RPN only. But I think it will not be.


#28

Hello!

Quote:
I really like this idea. The HP-35 Anniversary Edition should be non-programmable, traditional design and RPN only. But I think it will not be.

Ohhh yes :-)


And the whole thing built into a cast-titanium housing (about as technologiocally challenging as a scientific pocket calculator in 1972) with a large dot-matrix (O)LED display. Powered by an advanced polymer battery with near-infinite cycles, that gets charged by invisible solar cells behind the translucent keyboard, which in turn is automatically backlit in low-light environments... (mind you, this is not sci-fi, but there are watches that work that way!)


I at least would be ready to pay the same amount in todays Euros/Dollars for such a calculator as was required to buy the original thing in 1972. But I'm afraid I'll have to wait for the 50th anniversary for it to happen...


Greetings, Max


#29

Of course, HP would only sell a few thousand of these. Probably not enough to warrant attention diverted from other projects they have. Probably not enough to ever recover the costs involved.

Hey, just wait for OpenRPN. Oh, we are waiting, aren't we?


#30

Hello!

Quote:
Of course, HP would only sell a few thousand of these.

They only sell a few hundred vector network analyzers, and still they develop, manufacture and market them (or at least used to, now this kind of stuff is made by Agilent)! Many (expensive) luxury gadgets are only sold in small numbers and still the manufactureres make a fortune with them.


Quote:
Hey, just wait for OpenRPN. Oh, we are waiting, aren't we?

Oh yes, we are! Patiently :-)


Greetings, max


#31

Quote:
They only sell a few hundred vector network analyzers, and still they develop, manufacture and market them (or at least used to, now this kind of stuff is made by Agilent)! Many (expensive) luxury gadgets are only sold in small numbers and still the manufactureres make a fortune with them.

Have you seen how much top-of-the-line very low volume HP/Agilent test equipment sells for?
You often don't get any change out of 6 figures, with nothing being under 5 digits.
Would you pay a few thousand dollars for a calculator?
Developing a calculator like this in a big company like HP costs millions of dollars, and if you only sell a thousand, well, do the math with regards to break-even after profit margin etc...

Dave.

#32

Hello, Max-

Quote:

And the whole thing built into a cast-titanium housing (about as technologiocally challenging as a scientific pocket calculator in 1972) with a large dot-matrix (O)LED display. Powered by an advanced polymer battery with near-infinite cycles, that gets charged by invisible solar cells behind the translucent keyboard, which in turn is automatically backlit in low-light environments... (mind you, this is not sci-fi, but there are watches that work that way!)


I at least would be ready to pay the same amount in todays Euros/Dollars for such a calculator as was required to buy the original thing in 1972.



The closest thing to what you described would be a 15" Macbook Pro running the latest version of Mathematica. The newest Macbook has many of the features you described, and the cost would be very close in constant money to that of the HP-65 or 67 (Which had state-of-the-art I/O) back then.


A bit bulkier than the HP-35, of course, but the point is that the HP-35 in 1972 was a cutting-edge technological product which filled an unmet need for working scientists and engineers. Any new machine will have to do that or it will not be profitable, and it will not be made.



John


#33

Hello John,

Quote:
The closest thing to what you described would be a 15" Macbook Pro running the latest version of Mathematica. The newest Macbook has many of the features you described, and the cost would be very close in constant money to that of the HP-65 or 67 (Which had state-of-the-art I/O) back then.

No, no, not really. I was rather thinking of a caculator equivalent to a classic Leica-rangefinder-camera (http://www.leica-camera.co.uk/photography/special_editions/leica_m7_titanium/): These things have a very basic functionality, but are made from the best materials using state-of-the-art craftsmanship and are designed to last a lifetime - or even longer. Where far-east products are made from plastic, are full of bells-and-whistles and sell by millions at ridiculously cheap prices, Leicas are manufactured by thousands at best, are awfully expensive and yet the company has its faithful customers since three or four generations.


So that's what I'm dreaming of: An anniversary edition calculator that I can use every day for the rest of my lifetime and about which my grandchildren (should I ever have some...) will start a fight in case I forget to explicitely mention it in my last will :-)

Waterproof, solid titanium housing, eternal power supply (Citizen guarantees that their "eco-drive" watches last for a minumum of 20 years, so HP, take up the challenge!), unbreakable keys and display, basic functionality (for programming and fancy extras everybody has a personal computer anyway). All inside a beautiful soft-leather pouch designed by Prada and I bet that I will not be the only one who would spend in excess of 1000 Euros for it. "The last calculator you'll ever need to buy" would be the appropriate sales slogan!



Greetings, Max


Edited: 12 June 2007, 6:00 a.m.


#34

I know the original LED display ate batteries like they were going out of fashion but would it be possible using modern technology to get something thet looked like a LED display but that gave reasonable battery life ? I just really like red or green LED displays and it would be cool on an anniversary edition.


#35

Hello!

Quote:
I know the original LED display ate batteries like they were going out of fashion but would it be possible using modern technology to get something thet looked like a LED display but that gave reasonable battery life ? I just really like red or green LED displays and it would be cool on an anniversary edition.

This could be either OLED (organic LED) displays, that give excellent brightness and contrast at reasonable levels of power consumption or LED backlit inverse (white-on-black) liquid crystal displays. Both kinds of display are fairly common now with mobile phones, mp3 players, car radios, digital cameras and similar battery-powered portable devices. Proven technology, so to say...

Greetings, Max


#36

I second the vote for OLED displays. They are not quite "proven Technology" yet but they are constantly improving. You could have a nice sharp color display for graphics, or switch to all red for that Classic look.

John

#37

Quote:
I know the original LED display ate batteries like they were going out of fashion but would it be possible using modern technology to get something thet looked like a LED display but that gave reasonable battery life ? I just really like red or green LED displays and it would be cool on an anniversary edition.

Yes it would be possible with todays high efficiency LEDs, but depends on your definition of "reasonable".
You can get decent brightness these days on sub-1mA per LED, so for say a 12 digit display that would be under 100mA worst case total for direct drive (which you wouldn't use anyway). On a set of AA's that would equate to roughly 30hours use worst case.

PWM and multiplexing techniques could of course substantially improve on this. It would be possible to get <10mA draw for the entire display, giving you roughly 300 hours continuous use worst case. That's almost a years use at 1hr/day on AA's. I think that's pretty reasonable.

The OpenRPN project could offer an LED display as an option perhaps?

Dave.


#38

300 hours seems entirely reasonable to me. Sign me up for one now :)


#39

Quote:
300 hours seems entirely reasonable to me. Sign me up for one now :)

That's worst case I recon, I'm pretty sure I could do 1000 hours with a bit of work.

Would you like that in Red, Green, Orange, Yellow or Blue Sir?

Dave.

#40

Quote:
I know the original LED display ate batteries like they were going out of fashion but would it be possible using modern technology to get something thet looked like a LED display but that gave reasonable battery life ? I just really like red or green LED displays and it would be cool on an anniversary edition.

I collect LED watches and i'm always on the lookout for a modern watch with a modern display that looks like an LED watch. There is one. It's an LCD display that has red numerals on a black background. It doesn't look exactly the same of course because it isn't self-luminous but it's the closest i've seen, and I don't think it uses any more power than a traditional LCD. It's the one on the left in the picture.
http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/7549/p1010303hb3.jpg


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