Thank you. Point not !



#23

Excuses my English.
I would like to ask to all that concluded the subject on Valentin and me.
I thank the whole support and the sensibility.
And I am sure that Valentin is a very intelligent person and he didn't want to speak anything on me.
I ask for excuses the whole for my topic on the value of the HP-46.
I wanted a lot to contribute to the alone forum that I have a barrier the language.
Sincerely I apologize to all.
It is again excuse my English

HP For Always (HPFA) :-)

Edited: 1 Mar 2007, 4:19 p.m.


#24

You're welcome, Gileno !

Don't worry about your english speaking, mine isn't much better :-)

The most essential thing is friendship and respect between us, (there are enough worries out of there) and our common interest for vintage HP calculators, each person with his own capabilites... and his own sensibility !

Continue to look for particular HPs on eBay, I often have a look to your links.

A rivederci, Gileno. (Is that correct ?)


#25

Thank's. Até mais :-)

#26

Well-said, Gileno. Whatever your ability is in English, it is far superior to mine in yours. Thank you for doing us the honor of trying so valiantly to communicate in my native language.

Chao,

Ron

#27

Glad you're staying, Gileno.

It would be pointless of me to make the pun I was thinking of ..

Regards,
Howard


#28

"Point not, using an integer-valued pointer to address the second character in a HP-41 Extended Memory text-file record.

Point rather, using a value of the form rrr.001 with SEEKPT or SEEKPTA to address the character."

(Reference: HP-41CX Owner's Manual, pp. 213-216)

Hmm, I'd say that John F. Kennedy's famous quote will remain more memorable, although we really ought to be asking what our calculators can do for us, rather than what we can do for our calculators...

-- KS


Edited: 2 Mar 2007, 1:05 a.m.


#29

. . . as in, "n.0" -- or "precisely".

(But that's a bit of a stretch.)

Edited: 2 Mar 2007, 10:34 a.m.

#30

Quote:
"Point not"?

Only now I have figured out what Gileno meant by that:

Point not ! = Period [is] not exclamation mark

(I used to be smarter :-)

That's because in Portuguese "period" is called "ponto". That's one of the many false friends we have to beware of. Yet another example:

Idioma inglês = English language, not "English idiom".

Gerson.


#31

In 1984 I'd been away for a month in South Africa on business, and in anticipation of my return, I contracted to have a bouquet of flowers delivered to my wife. She'd been taking care of our "tribe" all alone, and was anxious for my arrival. So, on the little message card, I quoted a CSN&Y song, with,

   And you know, the darkest hour . . .
thinking she'd mentally complete the sentiment with " ... is always just before the dawn".

After handing the note card to the clerk, he called the tele-florist company to convey that message to someone at a computer terminal somewhere, so it could be transmitted quickly to the local florist in Washington state who would actually create the bouquet. I clearly remember him carefully reading the message: "He wants it to say, 'And you know the darkest hour', followed by point, point, point."

As in, decimal points, right? (Those quaint other-worlders and their curious names for things!)

Well, what she got was

And you know the darkest hour!!!

Not exactly a momentous mis-communication, but neither did it quite convey the sentiment intended.

Edited: 2 Mar 2007, 4:14 p.m.


#32

Fortunately the consequence is this case was just a small perplexity when the card was read, but some linguistic misunderstandings are said to have started wars. I don't know any true example, though.

Gerson.

P.S.: The florist company was not run by Mr. Flores, was it? Probably not, that other song is even older :-)

#33

Quote:
"Point not"?

Only now I have figured out what Gileno meant by that:

Point not ! = Period [is] not exclamation mark


Oh! I thought the meaning was this: "Point not thy finger at me; point thy finger at the other gentleman for this unpleasantness!"

As for my, um, paraphrased JFK reference in my earlier post in this thread, it was this from his 1961 Inaugural Address:

"Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country."

-- KS


#34

Quote:
As for my, um, paraphrased JFK reference in my earlier post in this thread, it was this from his 1961 Inaugural Address:

"Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country."



Hello Karl,

Yes, I know this part of John F. Kennedy's famous speech since I was 15. In the first page of an English book we had at home there was a picture of JFK and the phrase, accompanied by a Portuguese translation. This unusual negative imperative form sounds really very emphatic. It was quite a good surprise when my first multimedia encylclopedia (The New Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia Release 6 - 1993) presented, under Sounds/Famous Speeches/Kennedy, John F. (First Inaugural), this part of the speech in Kennedy's voice:

"...and so my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world, ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man!"

It would be amazing if there was a recording of Cicero's famous speech, in his own voice:

"Quo usque tandem, Catilina, abutere patientia nostra?". The recording in this link is not bad, but has a bit of American accent :-)

http://www.rhapsodes.fll.vt.edu/cicero.htm

Regards,

Gerson.


#35

Quote:
"Quo usque tandem, Catilina, abutere patientia nostra?"

Oh my gosh, Gerson!

I still remember what reaction this very quote (albeit a little paraphrased (sp?) ) had when I used it a couple of years back...

I wish you a better luck! ;)

Massimo


#36

Ciao, Massimo!

Quote:
I still remember what reaction this very quote (albeit a little paraphrased (sp?) ) had when I used it a couple of years back...

I wish you a better luck! ;)


I was thinking of providing a translation, but I coudn't think of anything close to the original. Anyway, the link shows the whole text and an English translation.

Best regards,

Gerson.

P.S.:

It seems I made a mistake when quoting from memory. That's the correct phrase, as quoted by you on 25 Oct 2005:

"Quo usque tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra?"

Perhaps because the usual Portuguese translation is

"Até quando, Catilina, abusarás de nossa paciência?"


Edited: 3 Mar 2007, 12:00 p.m.

#37

Quote:
Only now I have figured out what Gileno meant by that:

Point not ! = Period [is] not exclamation mark


Muito obrigado, Gerson! Thanks a lot - I was guessing, but couldn't find a clue. So what Gileno wanted to express was IMO:

Thank you. Period (not exclamation mark).

... showing he has learned exclamation marks are not welcome here. Well, special characters seem to be used differently in different languages. Their meaning may even vary in the same. For me, it's always fun to see e.g. baker's ads reading

"Frische" Brezeln

(literally translated: "fresh" bretzels). Because, to me, the quotation (sic!) marks indicate a doubt, meaning the bretzels are *called* freshly baken, but may *be not*. The baker used the marks for emphasizing instead (incorrectly, but widespread, saving the ink for underlining d;-)

Lots of traps even without crossing a language barrier!


Edited: 3 Mar 2007, 7:37 a.m.


#38

Point = END, Closing ... 
Simple :-)

Edited: 3 Mar 2007, 7:40 a.m.


#39

Exactamente! Solo debe saver que ha pensato il scrittore (hope that's halfway correct).

Exactly - the reader just has to find out what the poster meant when he was writing. As you said, it is simple d;-) Thinking in the same language strongly supports understanding. See Gerson's post.

Cordialmente de Germania a Italia!


#40

Quote:
Cordialmente de Germania a Italia!

I know for sure that Gerson was studying italian but he actually is from Brazil... :)

Massimo

#41

Quote:
Solo debe saver que ha pensato il scrittore (hope that's halfway correct).

Hello, Walter!

The first half of your phrase is Spanish, the second part is Italian. There is a light mistake in each half:

The correct Spanish word is saber, though it sounds approximately, but not exactly, "saver", in European Spanish. And the article before "scrittore" should be "lo", for euphony reasons.

But I have understood what you meant: only the one who writes can understand what he's written. I don't know if I have made myself clear, but I can understand everything I've just written :-)

By the way, Gileno, a nice guy, is from Brazil, where Portuguese is spoken (Spanish can be understood, though).

Best regards,

Gerson.

Edited: 3 Mar 2007, 11:44 a.m.


#42

Thank you both for your comments. You are right, I got it mixed up. Its a nice feature of Roman languages you can understand a large fraction of them if you know one (or at least some Latin), but making it difficult not to run into a mess as I obviously did. Desculpe por favor. Obrigado. Ponto.


#43

Quote:
Desculpe por favor. Obrigado. Ponto.

Hello Walter,

That's perfect Portuguese, although there is no need to apologize.
About Romance languages, the ones that are most mutually understandable are Portuguese and Spanish. As of Latin, even Italian has become distant from it. It is helpful though. Too bad they don't teach it here anymore at public schools.

I appreciate your knowledge of these languages, considering your native language is German, it appears. To someone willing to learn a Latin language I would advise studying Spanish first, as there are only five vowels. In Portuguese there are 17 vowels, some of them nasal vowels. Once Spanish is mastered Portuguese will be a bonus :-)

Best regards,

Gerson.

Edited: 4 Mar 2007, 7:14 a.m.

#44

Hi gileno,

you are really not alone with it. I guess sometimes my English seems to be a direct translation from German like "Babel Fish". ;-)

Off topic: I will send you a mail the next days.


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