Datafile article by VA



#7

Hi Forum.
I just read Valentin Albillo's article on Datafile V26 N1, "Long Live The HP-35!" - it's simply awesome!
I've always appreciated Valentin's contributions to Datafile and to this very forum, but that article really impressed me.
I'm sorry I miss some vocabulary (English is not my native language...)
to be able to fully picture the delight in reading "Long Live The HP-35!".
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I strongly suggest those of you who are not member of HPCC yet, to subscribe and enjoy such marvellous issues.
[Ad end] :)
Public congrats and thanks to VA! (…and in the very same issue of HPCC there are
two articles more by himself that I’m going to read… SLURP!)
Best regards.
Giancarlo

#8

Hi, Giancarlo:

    Why, thank you very much for your extremely kind words ! :-)

    I'm very happy that you enjoyed this article so much, as it was a novel approach to show off the HP-35's capabilities in the very best possible light while fully taking into account the existing technology at the time it was released, so that readers could get to really appreciate what it meant to us and to the world as a whole. I'm extremely pleased to see I succeeded as far as you are concerned.

    Also, thank you for your heartfelt recommendation of Datafile. As I've said a number of times, it beats me why so many enthusiastic HP fans are so willing to spend large amounts of money for a second or third copy of some HP calc model while thinking nothing of getting an inexpensive subscription to Datafile which can probably afford as much intellectual pleasure related to their HP hobby, if not more, and further helps this very last classic HP fan publication to survive and continue being a most worthwhile treasure trove for all of us who love HP calcs. As they say in some movie, "Hey, MoHP reader, I'm doing my part ! Are you ?" :-)

    I'm including here a description of my three articles featured in the current Datafile issue, V26 N1, and cordially invite every reader to consider subscribing to Datafile and have a look at
    them. I have plenty of similar materials waiting for your eyes in the
    very next issues ! :-)

    Long Live the HP-35 !

      This 5-page article, belonging to my ongoing "Long Live ..." series,
      is intended as a commemorative article for the HP-35's
      35th anniversary, and I think you'll agree it's quite an original
      approach to it. It does include three sample applications
      featuring four small programs, addressing such topics as
      root finding and numerical integration, as well as
      providing the appropriate historical context and a few
      personal anecdotes to spice it all.

    Boldly Going ... - Matrix Square Root

      This 6-page article is the first of a new series of articles,
      the "Boldly Going" series which, as its name implies,
      is intended to effectively go "... where no HP calc has gone
      before ..."
      , and so they will be dealing with unusually
      difficult
      programming tasks in a straightforward manner,
      thus expanding the limits of what you can do with your HP
      model and how simply can you do it. For instance,
      can you use your little HP calculator to find the matrix
      square root of these two neat little matrices
            |   56   97   17   89  |       |  4 +  i   7 +  i   3 -  i   4 + 2i  |
      A = | 33 -68 -42 5 |, A = | 6 - i 9 + 4i 8 – 3i 3 – 2i |
      | -206 -48 -34 -104 | | 1 + 3i 1 – 2i 4 + 2i 3 + i |
      | -39 92 27 30 | | 2 - i 1 + 4i -3 + 4i 1 + i |
      that is, to find matrices R so that R*R = A, in each case ?

      To provide a taste for the series, this first article deals
      with this task of finding the matrix square root of square
      matrices. Two full programs are featured: a 7-line subprogram
      for the HP-71B which can deal with real- or complex-valued
      NxN matrices, and a 45-step routine for the HP-15C which
      will find the square root of real-valued matrices up to 4x4. Full examples are provided, with comments and notes, as well as the underlying algorithm.

    Small Fry - Primes A'counting

      Finally, this 1-page article belongs to the new series
      "Small Fry", which is intended to feature very *small* articles
      (maximum 1 page), while still keeping all the flavour
      and bite of the usual longer ones.

      This first article deals with the topic of prime counting,
      i.e., finding out how many prime numbers there are up to a
      given limit N. For large N, generating all primes up to N and
      returning the count is prohibitively expensive in terms
      of running time and/or memory usage. What can we do
      about it when N goes sky-high (say 1010, 1015, or more) ?
      The article features an 8-line user-defined function for the HP-71B to
      accomplish the feat very quickly, as well as several comparative
      examples against other well-known prime counting procedures.

Best regards from V.


#9

Hi Valentin, all,

Found my first DATAFILE in my mailbox today! 80g of real paperwork, no e-mail :) Looks it really was a good idea to subscribe. Thanks for seeding this idea!

Best regards, Walter


#10

Hi, Walter:

Walter posted:

"Found my first DATAFILE in my mailbox today! 80g of real paperwork, no e-mail :) Looks it really was a good idea to subscribe."

    I'm truly glad you decided to subscribe to Datafile and thanks for your kind comments, much appreciated.

    I've got tons of new articles in the making for subsequent issues, touching all kind of topics, including both interesting theoretical subjects as well as true-to-life practical and immediately useful ones.

    For instance, in the very next issue, the newly created "Boldly Going" series will boast an article including a program I've written which will give a very important HP calc's advanced feature the bends, easily surpassing its performance despite HP's version being a machine-code (aka assembly language) implementation, all in a surprisingly few lines of code, while getting results as accurate or more up to 100 times faster !

    As far as I know it's never been implemented before in an HP calc so I daresay it'll open many an eye for sure ! :-)

    Now I sincerely hope you'll be eagerly expecting every other month for your Datafile issue to arrive in the mail, thus reliving those fond feelings we had while anxiously expecting our PPC Journals of time long past.

    Again, thanks for your support and

Best regards from V.

#11

A minor techincal correction :

It is not possible (AFAIK) to subscribe to Datafile. What you can do is join the HPCC club. That gets you Datafile (6 issues per year) and also permits you to attend the meetings in London every month (and elsewhere if we hold any :-), and so on.

For me the meetings are the 'high point' of the club. I can assure you they are not just about HP calculators. Yes, we do chat about HP calculators, we do use them (it's generally possible to find a member who can bring just about any model, handheld or desktop, to a meeting if warned in advance!), but we also talk about calculating in general, electronics, engineering, general hackery, and so on. Once a year we hold a more formal meeting with 3 or 4 short talks related to calculators/HP/whatever -- those meetings are really fun...

I would urge any HP calculator enthusiasts/collectors who can come to London on a Saturday afternoon to consider joining HPCC for the meetings alone.

#12

Quote:
Also, thank you for your heartfelt recommendation of Datafile. As I've said a number of times, it beats me why so many enthusiastic HP fans are so willing to spend large amounts of money for a second or third copy of some HP calc model while thinking nothing of getting an inexpensive subscription to Datafile which can probably afford as much intellectual pleasure related to their HP hobby, if not more, and further helps this very last classic HP fan publication to survive and continue being a most worthwhile treasure trove for all of us who love HP calcs. As they say in some movie, "Hey, MoHP reader, I'm doing my part ! Are you ?" :-)


At least 4 HPCC member wish that you would pay the memebrship fee rather than convincing the committee to give you free membership in exchange for articles. All other authors get nothing back for their time and trouble in producing their contributions.


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