Looking for HiRes Photo of HP80



#16

I am looking for a high resolution straight-on photo of the keypad of a cosmetically excellent HP80 so that I can create an overlay for my cosmetically compromised machine.

I have decided that it is way too risky and troublesome to try to restore the existing lettering by painting, silk-screening, dry transfer, etc. Also, it looks like the a machine as it is isn't stimulating much interest among buyers.

So it looks like I am keeping the HP80 and I would like to enjoy it fully, and that means being able to see the keypad functions clearly. Creating a laminated overlay from a colour laser printed high quality image and punching out the holes for the keys seems a very reasonable compromise.

The front view photograph here is exactly what I am looking for but I was hoping for something of higher resolution. There is no corresponding high resolution version on the MoHPC DVD, though I have asked Dave if he does indeed have one.

This is a very exciting possibility and I hope it works out. I can tell you that even with a partial black and white paper overlay replacing the labels I have wiped away, the keypad looks more "complete".

I hope someone can assist and I will let you know of my progress. I understand that some other Forum contributors have had issues with faded or vanished lettering on Woodstocks and Classics, and this may provide a way to make the cosmetically impaired calculator more easily usable, even if it does not rectify the underlying problem.

Les


#17

I have an advertising brochure for the HP-80 which folds out to a two-page color photo of the HP-80, from slighty above. It's about five times actual size. I haven't scanned it yet, though. It's in a guy's hand, and the n key is called out with a white line to text on the side... I think it would work, though.


#18

That is great! The white line could be blended out or filled in easily--the n key is going to be cut out of the overlay, and there is no text on the keypad out that way so I could easily fix a white line.

The important thing is that the photo be a direct take of the keypad so the proportions and perspective are correct. The low-res photo on this site is perfect in that regard.

If you ever get to scan the image and crop out just the calculator keypad, the file should be of reasonable size for email and I would be vastly grateful to you.

Before you do all this work, I should let you know I have asked Dave Hicks if he has an official hi res photo in his collection that for some reason didn't make it to the version 5.00 DVD.

If this works well I will share my results with the Forum. I am sure there must be some folks out there who are interested in overlays for their Classic or Woodstock machine to "restore" faded labels or just to protect the existing keypad. I use my HP41s with the grey overlays on them all the time for that very reason.

Thanks for replying to my request.

Les

#19

I have managed to create a reasonable prototype from the lo-res photo on the website with Microsoft Digital Image 10, a monochrome laser printer, yellow hi-liter, cheap xacto knife, sharp scissors, and packing tape as a makeshift laminate. Doesn't lay flat since the tape is too floppy, BUT it seems reasonable that with a crisper photo and proper materials an overlay that restores the keypad to its full appearance for adequate enjoyment of the calculator is very feasible and a lot less trouble than trying to restore the lettering directly.

If this works well I may create similar overlays, for protective purposes, for my 65 and 67, but that is a more complex proposition because of the several colours.

Will keep you posted.

Les

Edited: 12 Feb 2007, 6:04 a.m.


#20

Quote:
I have managed to create a reasonable prototype ... a monochrome laser printer

I have had very good results printing overlays for the DIY-RPN calculator using a photo printer. In some ways, they look too real. :-)


Quote:
... a makeshift laminate. Doesn't lay flat since the tape is too floppy...

I have used clear laminating film that has adhesive on it to protect the overlays. The biggest problem is applying the film without getting bubbles under it. I have had much better results with a hot laminator (sometimes called a pouch laminator). After running the picture and film through the laminator, I cool it between a pair of ceramic tiles to keep it flat.

Quote:
...cheap xacto knife, sharp scissors,...

I see this as a problem. It is very tedious to cut out that many holes accurately. I wonder if a crude punch could be made out of rectangular brass tubing that is sold in hobby shops. I would try cutting the tubing at a slight angle and then sharpening the edges of the cut. I would then place the laminated photo on a self-healing cutting mat and use an arbor press to force the punch through. A drill press can be used if you don't have an arbor press.

Another possibility is to get the photo Laser-cut. I am pursuing this for another project. I will let you know how well it works.

Quote:
BUT it seems reasonable that with a crisper photo and proper materials an overlay that restores the keypad to its full appearance for adequate enjoyment of the calculator is very feasible and a lot less trouble than trying to restore the lettering directly.

I agree. It sounds very promising to me.


-- Richard


#21

I just am going to cut out rectangles for the key rows rather than around individual keys. Also, as a health professional type I hope to scare up a small and very sharp little blade--about 10 by 5 mm, used for very fine surgical dissection.

Besides, all I am looking for right now is something serviceable. I will work on a more refined appearance later. Anything is better than having to deal with those heartbreaking dissolved off labels whenever I look at the calc!

I picked up some self sealing laminate sheets but they are only sticking on the one side. Since the overlay will not have and extra bit of edge for a seal, I put the surface to show on the sticky part of the overlay, slather some elmer's rubber cement on the nonstick side, and press it in Numerical Recipes in Pascal for a few hours to sandwich together. This won't be permanent, I know, but it is a decent experiment.

Will keep yo posted.

Les


#22

Quote:
I just am going to cut out rectangles for the key rows rather than around individual keys.

Yes, a lot easier than individual holes.

Quote:
I picked up some self sealing laminate sheets but they are only sticking on the one side. Since the overlay will not have and extra bit of edge for a seal, I put the surface to show on the sticky part of the overlay, slather some elmer's rubber cement on the nonstick side, and press it in Numerical Recipes in Pascal for a few hours to sandwich together.

I don't quite follow what you are describing here. I will continue with my thoughts anyway. :-)

Instead of rubber cement you may want to use a transfer adhesive. Think of this as sticky tape without the tape! It comes on a slippery liner. 3M sells it under its Scotch brand name as Poster Tape.

Note: I am real fond of tape. One time, I counted over a dozen distinct kinds of tape in my tool kit.


-- Richard


#23

Quote:
I don't quite follow what you are describing here.

The sheets have a clear, thicker non-sticky front, and a thin back with the sticky stuff on it.

The idea is to place your photo or ID card or whatever with the image toward the nonsticky front. The back sticks to the sticky layer and nonsticky front is held to the sticky back by a border where sticky and nonsticky layers bond to each other. The is no adhesive directly on the image side.

My overlay won't have a border--not enough room. So I have to stick the nonsticky layer independently or abandon this product (GBC Self-Seal Repositionable laminating pouches).

Hope that's clearer.

Les


#24

Quote:
The sheets have a clear, thicker non-sticky front, and a thin back with the sticky stuff on it.

The idea is to place your photo or ID card or whatever with the image toward the nonsticky front. The back sticks to the sticky layer and nonsticky front is held to the sticky back by a border where sticky and nonsticky layers bond to each other. The is no adhesive directly on the image side.

My overlay won't have a border--not enough room. So I have to stick the nonsticky layer independently or abandon this product (GBC Self-Seal Repositionable laminating pouches).


Now I understand. By coincidence, the hot laminator I have is also made by GBC. Hot laminating has the advantage that the bond is on both sides of the photo since the plastic itself is doing the sticking.

On a previous subject... An ink-jet photo printer uses thicker paper than a Laser printer. This would make the overlay less floppy. The extra thickness might not be desireable, however. The first overlays I did for the DIY-RPN calculator were done on an Epson R200 photo printer and were not laminated. I was surprised how well they stood up to fingers pressing directly on the printing.

Another question: How are you intending to attach the overlay to the calculator?


-- Richard


#25

If I like my handmade results I will laser print up a few of the colour ones and have them properly hot laminated at a copy shop. (I need to find use of a colour laser printer--I only trust myself to get the size right.) I can also laser print them on thicker paper--think I have a few dozen sheets of HP 32lb stuff around here.

I would just drop the thing on top. There are no little clips like on the HP41. This is low tech here. Right now I am using just a partial little template to mark the location of the wiped out labels. It is a rough job, but the fact that I can see "YTM INTR BOND" and "CLEAR" clearly once again makes me happy.

Les


#26

Print it on MACtac, and you can stick it on.


#27

Ron, I want to preserve the existing labels on the calculator, so I don't want anything sticky on the surface. This isn't intended to be a perfect or permanent fix, just a temporary one so I can see all the labels when I use the calculator.

#28

I gave up fighting with this self-laminating stuff, so this is my result for now.

I printed the keypad image, after some photoshopping to brighten the text and darken the background, on the heaviest stuff I have around the house--32lb laser paper (a few sheets left over after printing up an important document a few years about). Coloured in the lettering with a yellow highliter. Used just the top half of the image--there is only on shifted function on the lower keypad, Sigma-, and that is intact. I cut out rectangles for the key rows, a notch upper left for the on/off switch. Reinforce left and right edges with a thin strip of tape (I made little cuts from the edge to get the rectangles out). Apply a very thin light layer of rubber cement to left an right edges (there is not lettering on the keypad there), just to make it tacky and help hold it flat.

For routine use and enjoyment of the calculator, this is the best result. Indeed the the natural matte finish of the black on the paper is a good "blend" with the uncovered bottom half of the keypad.

If this solution gets torn, faded, crinkled, etc., I can just print up, highlight, and cut out a new one. If I want something more enduring, I could always get heavier quality paper--I don't think I can put bristol board through the printer, but cardstock a bit heavier than 32lb should work well.

This is also a partially aesthetic fix too. It is not perfect, but at least the keypad LOOKS symmetrical and complete now, even if the labels are day-glo highliter yellow instead of the nice HP gold yellow. And I will get used to it--when I look at my 41CV and CX with their overlays in place, my brain naturally accepts their presence and usefulness, and I don't think each time "the uncovered keypad is so much more attractive".

Thanks for your input, and double thanks to allen for the very good photo.

Les

Edited: 14 Feb 2007, 7:18 a.m.

#29

Les, Try this;

Regards,
Al


#30

Allen that is great!

The white specks can easily be blended out, but the crispness around the gold labels is excellent!

Now the big challenge is finding the appropriate laminate material and a clean way the get the key strips cut out. A B&W laser printing is fine--a yellow highlighter gives the desired effect for my purposes. If this works I will invest in colour laser images.

Les


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