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Learning RPN. - Printable Version

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Learning RPN. - K. Crowe - 01-02-2003

Im trying to become efficient with RPN but I need some practice questions and examples to try, there are only 2 in the 49 manual, and I have also been through the section on this website. Is there a website with a bunch of examples that I could work through?

Thanks.


Re: Learning RPN. - Paul Brogger - 01-02-2003

If you're willing to spend some money, you might buy a set of CD's from the Museum. The many manuals (for various RPN models) reproduced therein will contain LOTs of examples.

(And there'll be lots of other good stuff, too.)


Re: Learning RPN. - Howard - 01-02-2003

http://www.hpmuseum.org/rpn.htm


Re: Learning RPN. - J Neely - 01-03-2003

Not to sound rude or anything but why not try using a math book? Most books have the answer answers to the odd numbered questions in the book of the book. That way you could check to see if your calcuation procedure using RPN is correct.


Re: Learning RPN. - K. Crowe - 01-03-2003

Ive been working out of my texts, I was just wondering if there are any websites that have RPN solutions all written out.
Thanks.


You already know it! (Now, can someone teach me Algebraic?) - Andrés C. Rodríguez (Argentina) - 01-04-2003

From the point of view of many people here, including myself, RPN is much more natural than any other calculator operating style; that's why we refuse to leave it! That's why I would say you already know RPN...

I would suggest to visit some pages here at the MoHPC web site, and/or obtain some HP calculator manuals dated before 1990, and just try, you will find it very easy to "learn".

Welcome, and good luck!


My name on this list, please! - Vieira, Luiz C. (Brazil) - 01-04-2003

Hi, Andrés; como estás?

as well known by the others, I am also an RPN addicted, guilty as charged! But Algebraic is nice... to learn math. If Jan L/ukasiewicz had invented math, mankind would have another history.

Please, Algebraic guys: I program in C and C++, so I have, no regreats at all, to use algebraic form. Gladly!

cheers.


RPN - Michel Beaulieu - 01-04-2003

I agree with you, it's easy to learn, But why is it disapearing? Probably because RPN calculators were not in school or students budget limits no? I learned math with the help of TI calculators so it's difficult for me and a lot of students to change when you don't encounter RPN calculators.

TI should have built a linf of RPN calculators at the same price of a TI-30 in the 70' and probably their should be more RPN in school now.

I have a TI-83 and install a flash application call "RPN III"!!! It's fun but not a lot of functions of the calculators are integrated with this application. Someone should try to make a TI graphing completly RPN by doing a new operating system. :-)


Re: RPN - Paul Brogger - 01-06-2003

Imagine how things might have developed had H-P introduced a parallel line of simple, low-cost, minimal-features RPN calculators for entry-level users (read: "students"). H-P could have retained the high-cost, upper-end programmable and HP-IL model lines, while simultaneously offering to even the budget-obsessed the legitimate option of using RPN rather than Algebraic.

If TI could make scientifics for $30.00, H-P could have as well. Teachers could even have recommended an H-P model for their classes! H-P might have branded them differently, or qualified the series' name somehow, to protect the image of the upscale models.

Once, say, half of the emerging user market was exposed to RPN and could appreciate its advantages, the trade-up path to H-P's more expensive models would have been taken at least as often as that across to less-expensive Algebraics.

By refusing to compete on price in the entry-level market segment, H-P sowed the seeds of destruction for its calculator product line, and for RPN along with it. Which, by the way, makes their current strategy look all the more brain-dead: a Hewlett-come-lately entry into the no-margin end of the market, with essentially generic products. Incredibly, these models lack the only product differentiation which might be offered by H-P via re-branded hardware -- RPN!

I think I'm quoting another MoHPC Forum contributor when I repeat: It's no longer infuriating -- just bloody depressing . . .