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OT: Happy Pi Day! - Printable Version

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OT: Happy Pi Day! - Eddie W. Shore - 03-14-2013

I have pi memorized as 3.141592653589793. It used to be 35. How many digits do you know?

Happy Pi Day! (March 14)

http://edspi31415.blogspot.com/2013/03/happy-day-and-some-mathematical-art.html?m=1


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Namir - 03-14-2013

In two years the Pi day will be a bit more, uhm, shall we say, significant.

:->

Mir


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Valentin Albillo - 03-14-2013



Hi, Eddie:

Quote:
I have pi memorized as 3.141592653589793. It used to be 35. How many digits do you know?



These:

3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971

that's 41 digits in all (as in "HP-41").

Best regards from V.




Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - jonathan G harris - 03-14-2013

Way back when I was in school and we had pi digits on a banner over the dry erase board in the mathlab where I tutored/studied. A fellow engineering student and I mememorized quite a few digits. I always felt proud that I could recite more digits than either of my abandoned graphing calculators would display...

Here goes without looking... 3.1415926535897932384626433


My friend who was doing a dual math/computer engineering major memorized more digits than me but he was also a bigger nerd...


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Dieter - 03-14-2013

More than 30 years ago I had a table with the first 1000 (or 10000?) digits of Pi, calculated by some IBM mainframe back in the Fifties. I used to memorize about 100 digits. Today it's more like 40 decimals (up to ...50288 41971). Still enough for most everyday problems, e.g. checking the 34s double precision value. ;-)

Dieter


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Chris Smith - 03-14-2013

A mere six digits. It used to be about thirty, but having three children ruined that part of my brain.

To be honest though, as an "apathetic pragmatist", if I've had to do anything with Pi by hand, I can't be bothered to use any more digits. To be even more honest, 3.14 is pushing it before I grab a calculator these days.


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Namir - 03-14-2013

In my fictional book (on Amazon Kindle) "Long Time Ago When I was Freud", there is a scene at the apartment of Einstein in Bern, Switzerland. I had taken my son to visit there. We run into a very smart Indian lady (who is really a math/stat genius using her talents to be a most sinister econo-terrorist) who challenges my son to quote as many digit of pie as she can. She quotes the first ten decimals and claims to know the next ten decimals. I thought mentioning the decimals of pie would be an interesting thing in the book.

Namir


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Egan Ford - 03-14-2013

Quote:
.. most sinister econo-terrorist ...

Now I have to read that book. :-)


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Geoff Quickfall - 03-14-2013

Namir, how many digits does PIE have?

Now that's easy as pie!

:-)

Darn spell check!

Edited: 14 Mar 2013, 12:16 p.m.


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Namir - 03-14-2013

PIE has one digit ... O ... :-)


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Namir - 03-14-2013

It's available on Amazon for the Kindle. The two plots in the book are original ideas of mine!


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - LHH - 03-14-2013

'The Joy of Pi' is a fun book, contains the first million digits and many interesting facts about the number of digits people have memorized. People have even written novels where the number of letters in each word in sequence follows Pi. Amazing stuff. Anybody want to guess the number of digits the current record holder has memorized?

I find I can "handle" PIE with three digits (without silverware).


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Dan W - 03-14-2013

I saw some show a while back about a savant who could recite over 22,000 digits of Pi.

Me, just 10.


Re: OT: Happy Pi Day! - Les Koller - 03-22-2013

Entirely from memory... 3.14159265358979323846264 is all I got. I have two ninth graders that learned this much in 7th grade. No big deal, but to remember it 2 years later? I was suitably impressed and congratulatory.