HP Forums
Powering the 82240B IR printer - Printable Version

+- HP Forums (https://archived.hpcalc.org/museumforum)
+-- Forum: HP Museum Forums (https://archived.hpcalc.org/museumforum/forum-1.html)
+--- Forum: Old HP Forum Archives (https://archived.hpcalc.org/museumforum/forum-2.html)
+--- Thread: Powering the 82240B IR printer (/thread-105354.html)



Powering the 82240B IR printer - Les Wright - 01-03-2007

My printer arrived, and I have some questions about safely powering it from AC.

The seller provided not the original adapter but a Canon one--6V, 1A, 15W output. Seems to work fine, though in printing from my HP48 I have to keep everything pretty still to avoid funny characters appearing in the output.

I happen to have a another adapter with the same plug size for my external hard drive--12V, 3A, 36W output. When I use this the printer is faster and more forgiving about the positioning of the calculator.

So this is my question--I would like to be able to use the higher voltage higher amperage adapter for its improved speed and accuracy, but I want to know if this is safe--will that extra voltage and amperage eventually cook the print head or fry the internals?

Grateful for guidance, as always!

Les


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Bill (Smithville, NJ) - 01-03-2007

Hi Les,

Just checked the 82240B printer manual. The specs call for the following adapter:

9-12V AC or DC

500-1.5 ma

There's also the Note: Do not use the AC adapter without batteries installed, because the printer may require supplemental battery power during heavy printing.

Also says: Slight battery depletion occurs during printing using AC adapter.

Plug size is 5.5 mm outside and 2.1 mm inside.

I would think the 12V , 3A adapter should be fine. But you may also want to have good batteries installed also.

Bill


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Gerson W. Barbosa - 01-03-2007

Hi Les,

I use a 12V/800mA (DC) power supply. The same I use to power my HP-200LX. You don't need to worry about polarity (when powering the printer), it will work even with AC (9 V, of course!). By what I remember, the safe range is 9-12V (DC) or 6-9V (AC) (These have to be checked as I cannot find any reference). Once I applied 15V DC to my older printer. It worked but I noticed an overheating, no consequences though. I opened it later and everything was ok. Following the AC adapter connector, there's a full-rectifier bridge, which means it was designed to be powered from AC, like the HP-71B, for instance.

From the manual:

"Do not use the AC adapter without batteries installed, because the printer may require supplemental battery power during heavy printing. Use only the HP F1011A AC/DC Adapter. Slightly battery depletion does occur during printing using the AC adapter."

However I've been powering my printers with the AC adapter only, no problem so far. Perhaps this applies only to the original adapter.

Happy printing!

Gerson.




Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - James M. Prange (Michigan) - 01-03-2007

Hi Les,

From the HP 82240B Owner's Manual: 9-12 V AC or DC; 500-1500 mA.

The older HP 82241A adapter is rated 9V AC 13.5VA MAX, and the newer HP F1011A adapter is rated 12V DC 0.75A.

Experimentally, either polarity DC works fine.

So your 12V adapter is just fine, although it's capable of supplying more current than the printer really needs.

As for cooking the print-head, adjust the contrast for clear printing, but not darker than it needs to be, and the print-head should be safe.

The 6V adapter may work, but as you've found, it's marginal.

What does the self-test show for the battery condition running from the 6V adapter? 0 or 1 is supposed to mean that the battery should be replaced, and 5 is for the freshest battery or powered externally. At low temperatures, the battery condition will show lower, at least until the printer gets warmed up a bit.

Also from the Owner's Manual: Do not use the AC adapter without batteries installed, because the printer may require supplemental power during heavy printing. Use either the HP adapter designed for the printer or one that meets the specifications on page 13. Slight battery depletion does occur during printing using the AC adapter.

Experimentally, I haven't seen any problems with running it from the adapter without batteries, but I normally follow the advice in the Owner's Manual.

The Owner's Manual calls for alkaline cells, but NiMH cells seem to work just fine, although they can be expected to go low rather suddenly. My advice is that if you're going to be powering it externally most of the time, then use alkaline cells and check the battery condition with a self-test occasionally, or if you're going to run it from the battery only a lot, then use NiMH cells and have a spare set handy.

For anyone who has an 82240A, the power requirement specifications are the same as for the 82240B.

Regards,
James

Edited: 4 Jan 2007, 6:01 a.m. after one or more responses were posted


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Les Wright - 01-03-2007

Quote:
The 6V adapter may work, but as you've found, it's marginal.

Well, that settles it!

Thanks for the help and reassurance--I am glad I had the higher voltage adapter around, otherwise I would've grown frustrated quickly with the misprinting issue and would've blamed the printer. The printing is perfect with my own adapter, and I can keep the intensity setting low and get good clarity.

Les


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Mad Dog ebaycalcnut - 01-03-2007

I've used all kinds of non-HP AC adapters on my 82240A printer. I doubt 82240B is that different electronically.


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Les Wright - 01-03-2007

Thanks for the reassurance, 'Nut.

And welcome back! After your dramatic exit I didn't know if you would be back to see us. I am proud to let you know that the printer in question cost me a very fair $60 or so, including original box and manual. No fancy leather case, but the experience is enough to convince me that some of the prices we have been discussing around here for the same thing ($169 in on case) is wee bit high.

Les


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Mad Dog ebaycalcnut - 01-03-2007

Thanks! I only said I would not post about a certain unmentionable website anymore. However, I enjoy participating in other discussions.

Anyway, one more thing. Why not get a 82240A printer for cheap from somewhere unmentionable ;) and test out adapters on it if you are concerned? Maybe you can, from heaven knows what website of course, get an 82240A with some extra rolls of paper for a good price. You can then use the paper in your 82240B!


Edited: 3 Jan 2007, 10:32 p.m.


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Les Wright - 01-03-2007

I actually am quite happy with this one and I use good quality NCR thermal paper in all of my printers--not too expensive, and I buy a three pack of the big rolls and make two littler rolls from each. I hear there is active debate regarding the safety and virtues of "real" HP paper and newer stuff that is a bit thinner and my not have as much staying power in the printing. Some folks claim that non-HP paper is rough and will damage the printer head, others say they have had no problems after hundreds of rolls. Who knows?

You know, I still don't know the difference between the A and B version of this printer. All I know is that it seems to work fine with all three of my calcs that do IR print (28S, 48G, 42S). Can't figure out if the 49G+ will send to it, though....

Les


Re: Powering the 82240B IR printer - Mad Dog ebaycalcnut - 01-03-2007

This has been discussed a few times.

Luiz gave a great description!

Excellent discussion of A vs. B

Also, James, who also posted above, gave a great description in a different forum discussion...

Yet another excellent discussion

Edited: 3 Jan 2007, 10:51 p.m.


Printing to 82240A/B IR printer from 49g+/50g - James M. Prange (Michigan) - 01-04-2007

Yes, the 49g+ (and presumably the 50g) does send to these printers, but the maximum range is greatly reduced; experimentally, with careful aiming, a bit over 3 inches from my 49g+, compared to a yard or two with the 48 series. The range may well vary with the battery conditions of the calculator and printer.

Of course flag -34 has to be clear (Print via IR) on the calculator. The printing commands are the same as on the 48 series.

The keyboard shortcut for the PRLCD command on the 49 series is hold down ON, press and release CursorUp, release ON.

Regards,
James


Re: Printing to 82240A/B IR printer from 49g+/50g - Les Wright - 01-04-2007

Thanks James. Works fine, provided I use the more powerful AC adapter and the 49G+ is close enough and I don't move it around. No big hardship.

Right now, apart from printing the LCD, variable/program listings, and the stack, I can't seem to do much else printing-wise with the 48G or 49G+. The 28S and 42S have a trace mode that prints interim calculations in real time, and I actually find that of more interest to me right now.

Les


48/49 series print trace / vectored ENTER - James M. Prange (Michigan) - 01-04-2007

Ah, I'd forgotten about the trace mode for the printers. You can
get something similar by using vectored ENTER on the 48 and 49
series.

As you may expect, vectored ENTER "redirects" the normal execution
of ENTER, whether explicit by pressing the ENTER key, or implicit
by pressing an immediate entry key. For vectored ENTER to be in
effect, the calculator has to be in User keys mode (flag -62 set),
and Custom ENTER mode (flag -63 set) and at least one of the
global variables \GaENTER (alphaENTER) or \GbENTER (betaENTER) has
to be found on the current path.

You can think of \GaENTER as a pre-processing program. If you
start it with STR\-> or OBJ\->, then that command compiles and
"executes" the command line string. Note that for a "data-class"
object such as a number and character string, "execution" consists
of placing the object on the stack.

You can think of \GbENTER as a post-processing program. If it's
found, then a "key name" of whatever invoked ENTER is placed on the
stack. If you don't want the key name, then simply use DROP as the
first command in \GbENTER.

If both of these flags are set and \GaENTER is found, then instead
of parsing the command line and so on, the command line is simply
placed on the stack as a character string and \GaENTER is
executed. After \GaENTER finishes, the normal action of the key
that invoked ENTER (except for the ENTER key itself) is executed. After that, if \GbENTER is found,
then a string representing the name of the key that invoked the
ENTER is placed on the stack, and then \GbENTER is executed. Note
that for the key name, only keys that correspond to named,
programmable objects, such as built-in commands, XLIB names,
global names, or local names, return a meaningful string for
\GbENTER. For other object types, and unnamed operations such as
ENTER itself, only an empty string is returned.

Here's a pair of programs for print trace found in the 48G series
AUG:

%%HP: T(3);     @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: \GaENTER
\<<
PR1 @ Print the command line string.
OBJ\-> @ Compile and execute string.
\>>

%%HP: T(3); @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: \GbENTER
\<<
PR1 @ Print the key name.
DROP @ Discard the key name.
PRSTC @ Print stack in compact form.
\>>

And another pair found in Insights:
%%HP: T(3);     @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: \GaENTER
\<<
PR1 @ Print the command line string.
OBJ\-> @ Compile and execute string.
\>>

%%HP: T(3); @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: \GbENTER
\<<
"[" SWAP + "]" + @ Surround key name with brackets.
PR1 @ Print the bracketed key name.
DROP @ Discard the key name.
PR1 @ Print the level 1 result of the operation.
\>>

My personal preference:
%%HP: T(3);     @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: \GaENTER
\<<
PR1 @ Print the command line string.
STR\-> @ Compile and execute string.
\>>

%%HP: T(3); @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: \GbENTER
\<<
"[" SWAP + "]" + @ Surround key name with brackets.
PR1 @ Print the bracketed key name.
DROP @ Discard the key name.
PRST @ Print the stack.
\>>

Try the above, and maybe experiment a bit yourself.

Another possibility for \GaENTER would be prefixing a string
with "#" and suffixing it with "h" for entry of hex integers.
HP 48 INSIGHTS PART I: Principles and Programming
also has example programs BINCALC (Binary Calculator) and FRACALC
(fraction calculator) that use vectored ENTER. For anyone really
interested in the RPL models, I recommend buying the HP Museum
CD-ROM set / DVD and reading the books by William C. Wickes.

A disadvantage of vectored ENTER is that any directory can have
only one set of \GaENTER and \GbENTER variables (although each
directory can have it own set). Particularly if you want to have
more than one set of vectored ENTER variables, you may want to
have a named program store new content to these variables when you
execute it; for example:

%%HP: T(3);     @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: TRON
\<<
\<<
PR1 @ Print the command line string.
STR\-> @ Compile and execute string.
\>>
'\GaENTER' STO @ Store above program.
\<<
"[" SWAP + "]" + @ Surround key name with brackets.
PR1 @ Print the bracketed key name.
DROP @ Discard the key name.
PRST @ Print the stack.
\>>
'\GbENTER' STO @ Store above program.
-62 SF @ Force User keys enabled.
-63 SF @ Force vectored ENTER enabled.
\>>
And maybe:
%%HP: T(3);     @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: TROFF
\<<
-63 CF @ Force vectored ENTER disabled.
\>>
Or:
%%HP: T(3);     @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: TROFF
\<<
{ \GaENTER \GbENTER } PURGE
-63 CF
\>>
Regards,
James


Edited: 4 Jan 2007, 7:47 p.m. after one or more responses were posted


Re: 48/49 series print trace / vectored ENTER - James M. Prange (Michigan) - 01-04-2007

PS:

For easier reading (but more paper use) on the 82240A/B, you may want to insert CR CR at the end of the \GbENTER program.

Some other thoughts; if you're sure of which printer you'll be using, you could add more set-up commands to a TRON (trace on) program, such as -34 CF (Print via IR) for the 82240, or set up PRTPAR or IOPAR as needed. Of course you could also force more modes in a TROFF (trace off) program.

Note that to use the "screen capture" feature of the "Connectivity Kits", flag -34 needs to be set (print via wire).

Of course you can also print "via wire" by setting flag -34 for printing to a serial (RS-232) printer from a 48 series or 49G, or if you also have flag -33 set (Transfer via IR), it prints in "Serial IR" mode (48 series) or IrDA mode (49 series except 49G).

Regards,
James


Re: 48/49 series print trace / vectored ENTER - James M. Prange (Michigan) - 01-04-2007

PPS:

Personally, I sometimes find the the PR1 at the end of the
Insights \GbENTER to be not as much information as
I want. On the other hand, the PRSTC in the AUR program or PRST in
my program may take too long to print, particularly when the stack
is very deep. How about a \GbENTER that prints, let's say, up to a
6-level stack, or for a deeper stack, the depth and the lowest 5
stack levels?

%%HP: T(3);     @ ASCII transfer header
@ Program name: TRON
\<< @
\<< @
PR1 @ Print the command line string.
STR\-> @ Compile and execute string.
\>> @
'\GaENTER' STO @ Store above program.
\<<
"[" SWAP + "]" + @ Surround key name with brackets.
PR1 @ Print the bracketed key name.
DROP @ Discard the key name.
DEPTH @
IF @
DUP 7 < @
THEN @
DROP @
PRST @ Print the stack.
ELSE @
"Depth" @
\->TAG @
PR1 @
DROP @
5 1 @
FOR n @
5 ROLL @
n \->TAG @ Tag object with stack level.
PR1 @
OBJ\-> @ Split off most recent tag as string.
DROP @ Discard tag string.
-1 @
STEP @
CR @ Extra paper advance when using PR1.
END @
CR CR @ Advance paper for viewing.
\>> @
'\GbENTER' STO @ Store above program.
-62 SF @ Force User keys enabled.
-63 SF @ Force vectored ENTER enabled.
\>>
So, even though the 48 and 49 series don't have a built-in print
trace mode, the vectored ENTER capability give you the power to
easily create your very own customized print trace mode.

By the way, even though you won't have vectored ENTER if you purge
both \GaENTER and \GbENTER, if both flags -62 and -63 are set,
then the calculator will take the time to search the entire path
for them, so clear at least one of these flags when you want to
disable vectored ENTER.

Regards,
James


Re: 48/49 series print trace / vectored ENTER - James M. Prange (Michigan) - 01-04-2007

PS:

This probably isn't really significant for these print trace programs, as printing via IR is inherently slow, but the closer to the beginning of the current directory the global variables \GaENTER and \GbENTER are, the faster they'll be found. The slowest would be when they're at the end of the home directory, especially if your current directory is
deep in the subdirectory structure.

Regards,
James


Re: Printing to 82240A/B IR printer from 49g+/50g - Les Wright - 01-07-2007

James, thank you so much for this huge contribution. I will have to save and study your suggestions to discern how to best benefit from what you have shared with me.

On a more pedestrian note, it turns out that my wife and I have quite a few NiMH AA batteries around here, plus a good charger, so I will use them and see how much mileage I get. I actually use Duracell 2650 mAh cells in my 33C (yes, I know they don't quite fit, and one of the tabs is broken off inside but the connection is still made), and these babies kept that calc running in an infinite loop program for at least 30 hours before croaking. I have several batteries in the house in at least the 2000 to 2300 range too, so that should be lots of juice for the printer, especially if I use it on AC most of the time.

Les