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I got into synthetics in the 1980s. Now I am trying to brush up, for obvious reasons.

Text is: "Synthetic Programing" by Prof. WC Wickes

Any other sources?

Any advances in synthetics?

Synthetics on 71?

John

I'd recommend Kieth Jarret's Synthetic Programming Made Easy.

Rick

I got into it in the 80's with Mier-Jedrzejowicz's book "Extend Your HP-41." Later I got the ZENROM which did away with the need for the byte grabber and gave direct keyboard access to the synthetics as if they weren't really synthetic anymore.

And if you want even more, I'd recommend getting a CCD module:-)

The CCD module is rare, but much easier to get than the Zenrom,

and the CCD covers a wider range of entry aids, and eases use with many OS extensions.

Actually, the CCD module is _the_ OS extension for the HP-41.

I am not aware of any synthetic programming on the HP-71B.

The book "HP-71 Basic Made Easy" by Joseph Horn has a section on PEEK$ and POKE that show you how to read/write from/to the system.

Reading the HP-71B Internal Design Specifications is also a must.

Your other options are to use either the Forth language or the assembly language.

For the Forth language, at least three versions are available ...

- the Forth/Assembler ROM

- the 41 Translator Pac (include Forth)

- a RAM and ROMmable version is available on the J-F Garnier site.

For the native code, at least three assemblers are available ...

- the Forth/Assembler ROM

- an assembler is also available on the J-F Garnier site.

- the areuh tool for HP-48SX is also compatible with the HP-71B

Sylvain

The 41CL Extra Functions make PEEKing and POKEing simple. You don't need byte-grabbers at all. And you can POKE anywhere in memory. It's a lot of fun, even if you can get yourself in all kinds of trouble.

Ditto!

If you cannot find the module itself, any of the machine language development hardware (MLDL2000, NOV-series, etc.) will let you delve into it.

Cheers.

ZENROM has the direct memory editor too, which lets you edit any part of RAM. Again, you better know what you're doing, to stay out of trouble.

Quote:
I got into synthetics in the 1980s. Now I am trying to brush up, for obvious reasons.

The primary question is in my view:
How sexy can 41-synthetics be if you can hook up with MCODE?

Quote:
How sexy can 41-synthetics be if you can hook up with MCODE?

Not very, IMHO. In my mind Synthetics are great but a poor-man's replacement for some MCODE functionality :-)

Yeah, but the learning curve is so steep I keep falling off!

Quote:
The primary question is in my view:
How sexy can 41-synthetics be if you can hook up with MCODE?
There's still some good stuff you can do with synthetics that MCODE doesn't really help with, like putting non-keyboard characters directly into a string without using XTOA for example.

Edited: 22 May 2012, 2:27 p.m.

Quote:
MCODE doesn't really help with, like putting non-keyboard characters directly into a string

well, try the CCD OS/X for that: its MCODE implementation allows you to input the character just by using its code (in either Decimal or HEX) directly in ALPHA mode.

But I agree with you, synthetics is very helpful and much easier to learn/use/command.

Edited: 23 May 2012, 7:57 a.m.

Quote:
well, try the CCD OS/X for that: its MCODE implementation allows you to input the character just by using its code (in either Decimal or HEX) directly in ALPHA mode.
I know I should look into the CCD. (I think that's the one with the 500-page labor-of-love manual, right?) In ZENROM (which I have), once in ALPHA mode, you do <SHIFT> <ALPHA> and then the two-digit hex character value, 00 through FFh. You can do it for labels and other things too, although it won't work in the 41cx text editor. The <USER> <ALPHA> has the lower-case letters, and <USER> <SHIFT> <ALPHA> gives other ones including but not limited to []#()'"@&\.