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Today the lab we received our replacement calculators. Casio FX-300ES. Casios in a labratory filled with Hp GC/MS and Hp/agilent GC/MS equipment. There used to be Hp 32sii Calculators everywhere but the keys have slowly stopped working till just several are left. I admit, that the computers handle most calculations, but I still used the HP a least 10 times a day. To top it off the new calcs don't even have formula memory which is what I used the most. Management's main reasoning, Casios are cheap.

Unless HP starts making cheap RPN calulators as well as nicer quality calcs. (I don't consider the 9s an HP) They are going to just keep fading away like this.

I would disagree! The problem is that management tried to save money by buying cheap calcs. How much it really hurts the bottom line if they spent more for the calcs?

Well, the good news is, the Casios will probably wear out in a matter of months (if not weeks) in an industrial environment, at which point your management may re-assess the wisdom of going the cheap route. I'm guessing of course that your old 32sii's lasted at least a few years.

Maybe there's a bevy of 35s's in your labs future....

Best regards, Hal

Not to forget about the slow down this Casios will cause, when engineers and scientists suddenly need to learn how to handle parantheses.

Would be interesting to see if the managment guys also gonna buy Casios once their HP-12 stops working?

RPN is the best way to handle complex equations. But lets face the truth. AOS is here to stay and the world will not stop turning the day RPN will turn into RIP.

RPN is great when you are calculating step by step or "in the head" but a full equation editor trumps it every time for a fully known or developed equation. Especially for solving repetitively, it is so much more sure than RPN. I use the equation editor all the time on the 48GX as well for this reason.

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I'm guessing of course that your old 32sii's lasted at least a few years.
Maybe there's a bevy of 35s's in your labs future....

It is not clear that the physical construction of the 35s is such that it will last longer than a Casio. Disassembly of a 35s is not indicative of the materials and construction being different in any significant way from a midrange Casio scientific.

The feel of the 35s keys, however, is much better than the Casio, IMNSHO. While it's not identical to the traditional HP keys, it at least seems fairly comparable, and a huge improvement over the 33s.

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Management's main reasoning, Casios are cheap.

Oh yeah, right-- and all that Agilent equipment was cheap??

It certainly sounds like your managers knows how to spend money on GC/MS equipment, which are many orders of magnitude beyond the cost of expensive calculators. I'd have to lean towards picking up a 35s, if your co-workers are used to RPN it should be enough to incite demand for a more suitable replacement.

I agree that HP should develop a limited/non-programmable scientific RPN calculator to compete in the ~$20 range. That could easily be the equivalent of a 35s, without programming and the same build quality.

Yea, that was what I was hoping for when found the hp35s. However being a long lost fan I did find the hp35s price ok. But if low end rpn got out I could have choosen to get back in the game of programmable calcs/hp calcs by getting my a low end rpn and a hp50g.

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Well, the good news is, the Casios will probably wear out in a matter of months (if not weeks) in an industrial environment

Funny how all of my Casio's have lasted for 10-15 years, some of them in an industrial environment.
In fact I have never had a Casio die on me, ever.

Dave.

Since when has management ever dictated what calculator an engineer uses?
In every place I have ever worked, engineers supply their own calc, or management pays for whatever calc you want as a basic office/stationary expense.
If you don't like what they supply, ditch it and get whatever you like yourself.

Haven't you ever slipped a calc on a purchase order with a description like "industrial keypad" ;->

Dave.

Same thing here, three hp dead, but my first scientific got before any hp, a casio, still works... Dont know about todays build, but the old ones was quality...

I agree,

I have never used a company purchased calculator. Always my own HP (42S, then 48g, now 50g)

Hi JaSon,

the CASIO fx-300ES is sold in France uder the name "fx-92 Coll├Ęge"
(except that it doesn't have the dual power functionality).
I bought one for my son who's entering high school this year, and learned how to use it to teach my son when necessary. I'd like to correct some points of your post, and posts form other readers:

- even if this isn't an RPN calculator, it's very user friendly, and has certain functionalities very useful. You'll probably discover them when you'll have received yours.

- this calculator DOES have a formula memory, and more to say, very easy to use.

- CASIO calculators, and this one also, are totally able to resist to an industrial environment, except if using it in a dusty atmosphere or any critical conditions. My fx-602P is still operating and I use it at my office quite every day since 1985 (in fact, I have several calculators, amongst which some HP's, and I use them all, depending on how far they are fom my hand, and what I have to do with.)

HP calculators, especially the first vintage models, were better than other brands calculators in the past, but nowadays, they aren't. You have to face the reality as it is. It's probably sad for the HP enthusiasts, but if HP wants to recover is prominent place, they have to do a lot of work... The HP-35s is a good example of what remains do be done in terms of quality.

Just to finish : my '602P gives sin (90) = 0 in DEG mode, and sin(pi) = 0 in RAD mode...in accordance with the mathematic rules.

To my opinion, one of the main points in which HP remains the "best", is the design of the calculators (except some models that we all know). And according to this point of view, the 35s is a very good step in the right direction !
(I say "best" because I find that the competition that some people set between calculators brands is kind of puerile to my opinion).

Kind regards.

Jean-Michel.

Hello Jean-Michel,

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my '602P gives sin (90) = 0 in DEG mode, and sin(pi) = 0 in RAD mode...in accordance with the mathematic rules.

My CASIO PB-700 evaluates SIN(PI) = 0, in RAD mode (ANGLE 1), which is nice. SIN(3.141592654) returns -4E-10, which is slightly worse than the HP-15C result, -4.1E-10. The actual 10-digit result for SIN(3.141592654_rad) is -4.102067615E-10. What are the results on your CASIO calculators?

Regards,

Gerson.

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Just to finish : my '602P gives sin (90) = 0 in DEG mode, and sin(pi) = 0 in RAD mode...in accordance with the mathematic rules.

My calculator must be using a different set of rules. :-)

My 1981 made in Italy TI-30 LCD gives:

RAD: SIN(Pi)=0
DEG: SIN (90)=1

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Just to finish : my '602P gives sin (90) = 0 in DEG mode, and sin(pi) = 0 in RAD mode...in accordance with the mathematic rules.

Are you sure? My Casio 602P gives correct results in deg mode. Btw, after some 10 years of daily use, all keys register well and everything works just fine. The 602P is not AOS, it's much more similar to the TI 58C (but with much better keyboard - my TI's keyboard lasted only 1-2 years).