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When I was a kid, I remember perusing an issue of Popular Electronics magazine (I think) in which was presented a program for an HP programmable (65 or 67 if I remember correctly). Unlike the typical "Lunar Lander" program, this one would simulate an entire flight from Earth launch to Moon landing (in two dimensions). The user would enter a fuel burn vector (strength and direction) and the program would calculate the spacecraft's next position and velocity. It was up to the user to plot his/her flight on a sheet of graph paper.

Does anyone else remember seeing this program? Does anyone have a copy of it?

Thanks,
Stefan Vorkoetter

I haven't heard of that one. If I recall correctly, In 1979 Byte published a program for the HP-67 to do a 3D simulation of a trip to Mars.

I think I have it, it was oriented to the HP25.

That may be. At the time, I was too young to notice exactly which calculator it was. Is there a way I can get a copy of the article from you? If so, I'd be glad to transcribe it and put it on my web site to share with all.

Now that you mentioned that it was for the HP25, I did a Google search and found a reference to the program. In fact, I found a huge list of calculator programs published in magazines. Has anyone else seen this list: http://nleindex.com/index.php?pID=HTDI&sID=BrowseIndex&tID=E/255

Stefan



Edited: 25 Aug 2007, 10:11 p.m.

Quote:
When I was a kid, I remember perusing an issue of Popular Electronics magazine (I think) in which was presented a program for an HP programmable (65 or 67 if I remember correctly). Unlike the typical "Lunar Lander" program, this one would simulate an entire flight from Earth launch to Moon landing (in two dimensions). The user would enter a fuel burn vector (strength and direction) and the program would calculate the spacecraft's next position and velocity. It was up to the user to plot his/her flight on a sheet of graph paper.

Does anyone else remember seeing this program? Does anyone have a copy of it?

Thanks,
Stefan Vorkoetter




Here's the reference:

"Six programs written especially for the HP-25 programmable calculator. They are (1) Battle the dive bomber, (2) football, (3) blackjack, (4) space flight, (5) biorhythm forecast and (6) test your ESP."
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1977 (v.11#6) pg. 39.



I have a photocopy of that article around here somewhere. I'll try to dig it up for you.


"Space Flight" involves two planetary bodies and a rocket ship. The calculator gives you position (which you graph) and velocity. By giving thrust commands (magnitude and direction) you try to establish a stable orbit around the two planets, or if you are daring, try to de-orbit and land.


I remember trying these programs on my friends HP25C when they were published. Out of the six, I found "Battle the Dive Bomber" the most interesting. I used to run that on my HP29C, and ported it for later models.

That's exactly it! It'd be great if you could dig it up! Failing that, I'll try to find a copy of the issue on eBay (just missed one that went for $.01).

Stefan

My friend Chris, were you able to find a copy of that? I would like to see too.

Agreed -- I'd love to see that too. A post of the PDF or something would be awesome.

thanks!
bruce

/me too.

Quote:
I have a photocopy of that article around here somewhere. I'll try to dig it up for you.



Is there a way to "bump" threads on this board so they don't fall over the horizon? Otherwise I may never get a chance to test my daring, by attempting to de-orbit and land.

Funny that my mind is wanting to read the article even though I have MS Flight Simulator, Celestia, and a entire lineup of "expensive" applications on my laptop.

http://www.shatters.net/celestia/


Thanks,
Pal

Celestia is a nice program, I stumble upon a little while back.

I wish someone would make space shuttle simulator. That would be nice.

An excellent freeware shuttle simulator (and more):
Orbiter

Thank you my friend. I will have to try this.

Hello!

Quote:
I wish someone would make space shuttle simulator. That would be nice.

Try this one here: http://www.x-plane.com/

You can chose different stages from the full re-entry (about 20 minutes) to the final approach (about one minute). Apart from the shuttle, X-Plane is the most realistic (in terms of aeroplane behaviour) flight simulator for the PC, and the only one for the Macintosh. There are hundreds of very good aeroplanes available for free from an excellent internet community: http://www.x-plane.org/

Greetings, Max

I found my copy of the June 1977 Popular Electronics article "How to Program Calculators for Fun and Games" and fed them through the scanner.



Now I'm trying to figure out how to pass on the PDF scans (8 pages, about 1.5 MB). The scans aren't perfect, but most of it is decipherable.

And my sweet wife call me pack rat. You have 30 year old magazine. I guess we should be thankful for the fact you save them. Thank you my friend.

Perhaps you can use this:

http://www.yousendit.com/

No sign up is required. It works like a charm. You can upload files up to 100 meg. The file sits on a server for 7 days. The recipient receives a link in an email from which to download the file. I used a yahoo account with not problem.

If you do not wish to collect email addresses from everyone I would be happy to host the pdf for you on the internet if you send it to me. Then I'll just put a link here for anyone to download the file at their leisure..


Cheers,
Pal

green chile 505 at yahoo dot com

Here we go Chris

Cheers,
Tony

Quote:
If you do not wish to collect email addresses from everyone I would be happy to host the pdf for you on the internet if you send it to me. Then I'll just put a link here for anyone to download the file at their leisure..



Thank you very much for the information and the offer to host the file. Tony has already done that for me at:



http://www.hutchins.co.nz/scan.htm

Thank you Chris and Tony. Stefan for remembering his past...


Cheers,
Pal

THANK YOU!!

bruce

Thank you, for confirming that this wasn't something I dreamt. :-)

Stefan

My friend, I try Orbiter last night. It quite interesting program. Take a few tries to stay in orbit, and not have ballistic orbit path, but it very doable with Atlantis shuttle. Now I just have to figure out how to get back to Earth in one piece. :)