HP Forums

Full Version: FLAG-BUG on HP-35S!!?!!
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.

hello,
it is not possible to set (SF), clear (CF), or test (FS?) flags >9, because only the input of one digit is allowed with this commands (in RPN mode or inside programs)! - ALG not tested.
BUG!
or knows someone how to do this...

found the answer, you have to use ".0" and ".1" for "10" and "11" a little annoying, and not very intuitive

Press the decimal point key first (for "1") then press the second digit. That is ".1" = "11". Makes little sense to me.

EDIT: You beat me yourself. :)


Edited: 1 Aug 2007, 4:52 p.m.

This goes back to the 32s guys. No gripes allowed ;-)

Well, no NEW gripes allowed.

Hi, Bill --

Quote:
This (identifiers > 9 entered as ".n", n = 0-9) goes back to the 32s guys. No gripes allowed ;-)

For storage registers, it goes back farther than that: to the HP-34C at least. I think it's clever -- the first 10 registers 0-9 can always be addressed using a single-digit number, and the next (and final) ten registers with one additional keystroke. The HP-15C offered more (indirectly-addressible) registers, but these were rarely used.

The HP-41 and 42S offered 100 directly-addressible registers, so each one was identified by a two-digit number. That's why the HP-41 offereed a shortcut to the first 10 registers using the top two rows of keys.

-- KS

Edited: 1 Aug 2007, 9:48 p.m.

Quote:
Quote:
This (identifiers > 9 entered as ".n", n = 0-9) goes back to the 32s guys. No gripes allowed ;-)

For storage registers, it goes back farther than that: to the HP-34C at least.

It goes back way farther than that: the HP-19C/29C used this scheme for addressing the statistics registers (registers 10-15, addressed as .0-.5), and before that, the HP-55 used this scheme for addressing registers 10-19. Also, more recently, the HP-41 series used a similar trick, using the EEX key, to allow GTO to jump to line numbers > 999 (GTO . EEX 234 => goes to line 1234).

So, it's a venerable HP tradition. What kind of newbie does not know this? ;-)


(Waiting for someone to point out an even earlier model with this feature...)

- Thomas